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Irish Geography
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Data sources: UnpayWall
Irish Geography
Article . 2014 . Peer-reviewed
Data sources: Crossref
Irish Geography
Article . 2013 . Peer-reviewed
Data sources: Crossref
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Relationships between meteorological data and grass growth over time in the south of Ireland

Authors: Hurtado-Uria, Cristina; Hennessy, D.; Shalloo, Laurence; O'Connor, D.; Delaby, Luc;

Relationships between meteorological data and grass growth over time in the south of Ireland

Abstract

Ireland has conditions that favour grass growth throughout most of the year, resulting in a competitive advantage in providing ruminant production systems with a cheap feed source. Grass growth is highly seasonal with little growth over the winter period due to low temperatures and low levels of sunshine/solar radiation. Peak grass growth occurs in late spring and early summer, and growth in the late summer and autumn is restricted as temperature and solar radiation decrease. Meteorological conditions influence grass growth over the course of the growing season, as a result there are variations in grass growth within and between years, making grass budgeting at farm level challenging. Meteorological patterns were examined, factors having the greatest influence on grass growth were determined and start of grass growth was studied from 1982 to 2010 at Teagasc, Animal & Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland. Statistically significant patterns over the studied period were found in all of the meteorological variables studied. As expected, temperature had a big influence on grass growth in all seasons; evapotranspiration also plays a key role. These results suggest that it may be possible to use meteorological data to predict grass growth to help farmers to anticipate and organise the grazing management to match feed supply and demand. The study suggests that there are significant patterns in climate in Ireland, and that it might have future consequences on the rate of grass growth and on farm grassland management.

Country
France
Subjects by Vocabulary

Microsoft Academic Graph classification: Climate change Growing season Grassland Late summer Farm level Ruminant Evapotranspiration Grazing geography geography.geographical_feature_category biology biology.organism_classification Agronomy Climatology

Keywords

[SDV]Life Sciences [q-bio], Geography, Planning and Development, General Earth and Planetary Sciences

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    influence
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    Average
  • citations
    This is an alternative to the "Influence" indicator, which also reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
    49
    popularity
    This indicator reflects the "current" impact/attention (the "hype") of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network.
    Top 10%
    influence
    This indicator reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
    Top 10%
    impulse
    This indicator reflects the initial momentum of an article directly after its publication, based on the underlying citation network.
    Average
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citations
This is an alternative to the "Influence" indicator, which also reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
BIP!Citations provided by BIP!
popularity
This indicator reflects the "current" impact/attention (the "hype") of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network.
BIP!Popularity provided by BIP!
influence
This indicator reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
BIP!Influence provided by BIP!
impulse
This indicator reflects the initial momentum of an article directly after its publication, based on the underlying citation network.
BIP!Impulse provided by BIP!
49
Top 10%
Top 10%
Average
bronze