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INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS SOCIAIS DA UNIVERSIDADE DE L

INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS SOCIAIS
Country: Portugal

INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS SOCIAIS DA UNIVERSIDADE DE L

45 Projects, page 1 of 9
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 842320
    Overall Budget: 147,815 EURFunder Contribution: 147,815 EUR

    The Salazar regime was the longest-lasting dictatorship in Europe in the Twentieth Century. If the Military Dictatorship from which it emerged is taken into account, it lasted 48 years, from 1926 to 1974. Like the other dictatorships born in the inter-war years, it relied heavily on its secret police (PIDE) for stability. This research programme aims to reconceptualise the relation between the PIDE and Portuguese society in order to reach a more complete understanding of the regime’s exceptional durability. By drawing on developments in the international bibliography of totalitarianisms, of everyday life under a dictatorship, and of denunciatory practices, it challenges the established interpretative paradigm which sees the relation between the PIDE and society almost exclusively as one of top-down repression imposed upon a nation of passive victims. Its core argument is that the relation between the PIDE and Portuguese society was far more multi-facetted, dynamic and interactive than has been acknowledged until now. This research project posits as its main underlying thesis the notion that the Salazarist system was normalised by many Portuguese citizens as part of the structure of everyday life. Society adapted to the institutional framework imposed by the regime - including the secret police -, acting on the opportunities that opened up rather than remaining dependent or passive. If the role of society in the perpetuation of the Salazarist order is to be duly assessed, the framework of interaction between society and the secret police must be apprehended with recourse to a novel analytical prism (focusing on ordinary citizens instead of on the small minority of oppositionists who have monopolised the attention of historians so far), new research methodologies (oral history and opinion surveying) and original archival material (the letters of denunciation held at the PIDE Archives in Lisbon).

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 867466
    Overall Budget: 147,815 EURFunder Contribution: 147,815 EUR

    This research focuses on how within two contexts –in the Global North in Lisbon, and in the Global South in Goa – young people negotiate landscapes of touristification and neoliberalisation that relate to their futures. Exponential urban redevelopment, climate change and heightened capitalism manifest in both places through changes made to accommodate an economy focused on tourism-boosting. Austerity in Portugal, and a boost to tourism-centred jobs in Goa has resulted in young people leaving in search of jobs elsewhere. However, a large portion continue to stay back in these geographies and are employed by the tourism industry which paradoxically gentrifies them. This research will aim to understand how young people make sense of their futures through new, gig economies in rapidly changing job landscapes, whilst simultaneously making space for themselves by negotiating this very environment - they therefore resist while also existing. It will consider potential conflicts and shared understandings, while making sense of the entanglements of youth job cultures, future considerations, and the relationship to a sense of place. Sharing a history, albeit of colonialism, (Portugal colonised Goa from 1510 until 1961 after which the latter was taken over by India) makes for a novel perspective of Global North-South as well as a post-colonial dynamic which is missing from existing knowledge. The project will use a cross-cultural case study approach, with qualitative research methods in line with critical ethnography. The project will be strengthened by the multi-disciplinary background of the researcher in sociology and geography, alongside contribution from other disciplinary perspectives through researchers at the host institution. It aims to create both academic outputs as well as material and content for public engagement and dissemination.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101031282
    Overall Budget: 159,815 EURFunder Contribution: 159,815 EUR

    This project reconstructs series for Brazil’s population, prices, wages, welfare ratios, gross domestic product (GDP), and GDP per capita from the seventeenth century to 1920. This is the first reconstruction of consistent, annual population and economic series for this period and will change the understanding that we have today of Brazil’s historical economic growth. This project will be conducted at the Institute of Social Sciences (ICS) of the University of Lisbon, under the supervision of Nuno Palma, with Jaime Reis as a member of the board. Long-run GDP per capita series are central to economic growth research, to test competing hypotheses about why nations grow and decline, and for main debates in comparative historical development, such as the great divergence and the colonial origins debates. Until today, however, Brazil has been excluded from these areas of research. This project intends to bridge this gap using known figures in the literature, recently digitized archival sources, and novel archival research in the Overseas Historical Archive and the Torre do Tombo National Archive in Portugal. In addition to providing the first series of four centuries of Brazilian economic growth, it will contribute to a number of debates in the specialized and interdisciplinary literatures and generate open-access databases with the reconstructed time series.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 892010
    Overall Budget: 239,723 EURFunder Contribution: 239,723 EUR

    This project aims to research the educational provision and professional training available for youth in contemporary art museums, and how can these programmes enhance young people’s sense of agency and career opportunities in the creative sector. Focusing on the emergent turn in contemporary art museums across Europe towards programmes that offer young people professional training, this project will further analyse the potential of a tier-based structure when engaging with this age group, as it gives participants distinct access points into the life of museums, as well as new possibilities for their personal, social and professional development outside of formal education. Using a participatory action research approach, the project focuses on a pilot case study to be co-developed with a group of young people and the Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology (MAAT) in Lisbon, and analysed in tandem with three pioneer youth programmes in Portugal (Culturgest), Spain (Museo Reina Sofia) and the UK (Tate). Expected outcomes include a deeper understanding of young people’s sociocultural interests: their perceptions, motivations and expectations about art and museums; and of how long-term youth programmes can inform museums' future programming for this age group. The project will be strengthened by the background and professional experience of the researcher in art and museum education, alongside contribution from other disciplinary perspectives, including youth studies, through researchers at the host institution. It aims to create both academic outputs as well as material and content for public engagement and dissemination.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 749427
    Overall Budget: 148,636 EURFunder Contribution: 148,636 EUR

    This project aims at analysing the authority of the viceroys and governors-general - the highest representatives of the Portuguese kings – in the States of India and Brazil between 1640 and 1750 and as such, it deals with the relevance of non-formal expressions of power and authority, and their role in the efficiency of political communication. UNCERTAINPOWER seeks early expressions of the combination between formal and non-formal expressions of power and authority, namely in places where the physical presence of the main decision-makers was impossible to happen. In a world with ever-changing systems of communication, where virtual forms of power become more and more present, to offer a diachronic perspective on the uncertainties that long-distance expressions of power entail is relevant. The choice of the early-modern Portuguese empire is related with its early presence in the four parts of the world in a period when technologies of power and of communication were very different from ours. In UNCERTAINPOWER, issues that are still relevant today, such as the ways of expressing authority in very different socio-cultural contexts, the reception of this authority, as well as the links between these processes and the conservation of society will be discussed. Which were the ways chosen by Portuguese viceroys and governors to communicate their power and authority with the societies under their control? How did these royal agents exercise the prerogative of representing the royal power in an empire with a significant territorial extension and with a plurality of cultural and political realities? How did they adjust their political cultures to the local needs? How did the local contexts influence their ways of governing? And how did mobility challenge the meanings of power and authority? The more tangible outcomes of this project include 6 articles, 1 book and a virtual exhibition.

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