organization

UCL

University College London
Country: United Kingdom
1,291 Projects, page 1 of 259
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 702869
    Overall Budget: 183,455 EURFunder Contribution: 183,455 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    European policymakers are increasingly concerned about the unsatisfactory outcomes of efforts to harmonise economic growth and welfare with environmental quality, in particular due to the so-called rebound effects. The main objective of the EFFECT project is to develop innovative methods to identify and quantify key rebound effects, and assess their potential to impede the achievement of environmental targets in Europe. Some specific research objectives are: (1) review and classification of key environmental policies and targets in the EU and Member States in the context of rebound effects; (2) improvement of theoretical and methodological aspects of macroeconomic models used in rebound effect studies by integrating the ‘environmental rebound effect’ perspective; (3) assessment of the impact of rebound effects via EU and country-level ex post assessment of past key environmental policies and ex ante assessment of future policy scenarios and (4) proposal of recommendations to achieve net environmental savings from environmental policies, including optimal combinations and configurations, as well as optimal levels of welfare and economic development and equality. To attain such objectives, the EFFECT project will design an innovative analytical framework by combining an interdisciplinary perspective with micro and macro-level aspects of rebound effects. Such framework would allow a more comprehensive and scientifically sound study of the interplay between rebound effects and policy. In the context of the pursuit of a sustainable economic growth in Europe, this project can aid European policymakers in the design of effective environmental policies. Furthermore, the development of innovative and state-of-the-art analytical frameworks aimed at tackling exceptional societal challenges such as climate change resonates with the ambition of putting Europe’s in-house science and researchers at the forefront of worldwide scientific excellence.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 796220
    Overall Budget: 183,455 EURFunder Contribution: 183,455 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    A key dispute in palaeoclimate research is whether or not a permanent El Niño-like state, with warm waters spreading across the equatorial Pacific, existed during the late Miocene. Late Miocene climate was similar to the 4°C warming predicted for 2100 by the IPCC. As today’s El Niño causes global climate anomalies, a permanent El Niño-like state in the past may have had serious, global consequences, such as widespread aridity. MIONIÑO will test the existence of a late Miocene permanent El Niño-like state using geochemical microfossil records from recently recovered Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) sediments and earth system modelling to assess equatorial Pacific conditions, their driving forces and global impacts. MIONIÑO is timely, only being possible since the recovery of crucial WPWP samples in late 2016. MIONIÑO is also original and novel, presenting a new template for solving complicated climate questions using a new, robust stratigraphy and an interdisciplinary approach. UCL Earth Sciences is the ideal location to pursue state-of-the-art research in palaeoceanography and stratigraphy. Combining my existing expertise with key specialist knowledge from UCL researchers will equip me with the required skills to successfully complete MIONIÑO. I can hone my research vision and gain transferable skills to help me achieve my ultimate career goal of an academic research position. MIONIÑO will advance past and future climate change research. Resolving the debate on permanent El Niño-like conditions in the late Miocene will discern whether warm El Niño events, as occurred in 2015/2016, become more frequent or evolve into a new mean state. Assessing causal links between permanent El Niño-like conditions and increased continental aridity will improve the future climate models that underpin European climate mitigation and adaptation strategies. MIONIÑO can further help us understand the true societal impact of more frequent or even permanent El Niño-like conditions.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 800004
    Overall Budget: 183,455 EURFunder Contribution: 183,455 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    Although human emotions have a common biological basis, different cultures elaborate different aspects of their emotional world. This variation is reflected in the emotion lexicon, which, despite being well-studied among industrialized societies, remains under-researched in smaller cultural niches. This project focuses on emotion among hunter-gatherers, a rare type of society today, but a dominant one for 95% of human existence. Hosted by the UCL Anthropology Department—a world leader in hunter-gatherer studies—I will investigate the emotion lexicon in two hunter-gatherer languages to uncover the relationship between the semantic domain of emotion and sociocultural characteristics associated with different settlement patterns (mobile vs. sedentary), e.g., group size and social structure. Using methods from linguistics, psycholinguistics, and cultural anthropology, I will document the emotion lexicon among the closely related mobile Maniq and the sedentary Kentaq (Aslian, Austroasiatic) and examine it against the sociocultural background of each group. Via systematic comparison, I will identify forces shaping the emotion lexicon in each language, ultimately revealing how emotion language may coevolve with sociocultural change triggered by sedentarization. The findings will speak to the fundamental question of how meaning is shaped in our languages and will be of value to semantic typology, hunter-gatherer studies, and psychology.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 681489
    Overall Budget: 1,947,350 EURFunder Contribution: 1,947,350 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    The rapid expansion of digital touch technologies is set to reconfigure touch and the tactile in significant ways, much as optical technologies transformed sight and the visual. This has immense social significance for communication. There are, however, major gaps in our understanding of touch as it is digitally mediated, and methods are under-developed for a social account of digital touch communication. This project will break new ground as the first comprehensive study of digital touch communication. It aims to obtain a deep understanding of the social and semiotic character of touch as it is mediated by digital technologies and its consequences and impact on human communication, through four objectives, to: 1. Develop innovative methodologies for researching digital touch communication; 2. Describe, explore and critically analyze the social and semiotic understanding of the communicative potentials and consequences of digital touch; 3. Advance new theoretical insights on digital touch communication; 4. Make a major contribution to knowledge on digital touch interventions and design. Digital touch will be brought into sharp focus through the development of a novel socially oriented framework and methods that integrate the micro-lens of multimodality, the broad-ethnographic lens of sensory anthropology, and the experiential-lens of the arts. Eight in-depth case studies will be conducted in world-leading centres of digital touch innovation, with designers and users of digital touch communication in the wild (e.g. museums) and labs. These will investigate how the digital can supplement, heighten, extend, and reconfigure touch communication across a range of contexts (health, learning, work, leisure); re-shape what can be touched, lead to new touch-based capacities, practices and new forms of knowledge about the world.