Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

University of Salford

Country: United Kingdom

University of Salford

Funder
Top 100 values are shown in the filters
Results number
arrow_drop_down
5,226 Projects, page 1 of 1,046
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 1940776

    This study aims to improve sociological understandings of online anti-immigrant hate speech as a form of racism. Recent years have seen a proliferation of racist language online, with a 2014 study finding 10,000 uses of English racist and ethnic slur terms daily on Twitter alone (Bartlett et al., 2014). This phenomenon is undertheorised (Daniels, 2012: 705), and with no knowledge of what drives online racism, governments struggle with its policy implications. This study fits with Manchester's commitment to impactful, theoretically informed, empirical research, as it aims to provide policy recommendations regarding the spread of racism online. It will also contribute to the Department of Sociology and CoDE's leading research on the causes and effects of racism.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0500449
    Funder Contribution: 165,663 GBP

    Psoriasis is a chronic, currently incurable skin disease that affects 2% of the UK population and leads to profound psychosocial disability. Twenty percent of psoriasis patients have severe disease which requires systemic therapy with drugs such as methotrexate but response is unpredictable and there is concern about serious toxicity to liver and bone marrow. Strategies to optimise safe and effective prescribing of methotrexate have been neglected, particularly given the fact that there are genetic differences in how individuals metabolise this drug. Work performed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in organ transplant patients has linked these genetic differences to both clinical response and side-effects from the drug; it is unknown if the same is true in psoriasis. It is possible to analyse these genetic differences from blood samples. In addition, it is known that patients with psoriasis get liver toxicity more frequently than patients taking methotrexate for other conditions, this may be due to increased levels of a chemical called homocysteine. I will measure levels of homocysteine in blood and then correlate these to look for an association. It is very likely methotrexate will be a mainstay of severe psoriasis treatment for many years, we aim to optimise its use.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 1881433

    The aim of this project is to illuminate how neoliberal readjustments of the colonized university manifest in terms of power and resistance. This project aims to understand the manifestations of power and resistance to colonization within the university: 1. How does neoliberal policy underpin colonization of higher education? What is its impact on the relations between institutions, staff and students and what role do metrics play in this reconfiguration? 2. How do students collectively challenge such university and government power and how do micro-strategies of resistance compliment or contradict such efforts? 3. How do student-staff relationships reproduce or challenge neoliberal ideology in relation to teaching and satisfaction metrics?

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E02078X/1
    Funder Contribution: 80,613 GBP

    As stem cell technologies advance towards clinical application there is an urgent need to enhance the methods of delivering these cells into the body. Current methods of simple injection of cell suspensions are crude because they waste cells, compromise viability and generate poor starting conditions for the regeneration of a tissue. In this collaborative project between the universities of Nottingham and Manchester we will establish an injectable material consisting of a colloid mixture of cells and particles that is injectable at room temperature and aggregates into a porous colloidal gel at body temperature. This material could form the basis for cell delivery in neurology, endocrinology, hepatology, orthopaedics and many other areas because the components are well understood and trusted materials with long track records of use in the body. A successful outcome for this project will prove the principle of cell delivery into skeletal muscle tissue using temperature-triggered assembly and establish the fundamental principles involved.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2302880

    Scholl footcare and their owners "RB" (Reckitt Benckiser) invest significantly in R&D processes to conceive, design, test and validate their new products against well defined consumer needs. This involves interactions between many different professionals, from marketing, design, innovation, regulatory and business delivery. Processes are iterative, often run against very tight schedules, and necessarily involve risk of escalating costs, failure to meet time tables, and sub optimal product performance. RB therefore wishes to speed up, make more efficient and reduce risk within R&D activities wherever possible. One key area is the avoidance of clinical and laboratory studies that involve human participants. These are slow, costly, can be difficult to predict, and can have variable outcomes. Furthermore, due to these issues, product conception and development prior to testing can be influenced by the knowledge that downstream clinical or laboratory studies carry risk. To address these issues it is proposed that a foot simulator model is developed and deployed within ongoing RB Scholl innovation and product development activities. The research is intended to have impact the following commercial areas: 1. Faster screening of product concepts and designs through physical testing 2. Faster time to prototype and reduced iterations of prototypes 3. Improved product design and effectiveness due to greater control, time and flexibility in the innovation process that current processes allow. 4. Scientific data underpinning product conception, design and evaluation 5. Improved internal technical file data and thereafter regulatory requirements. 6. Product claims and marketing 7. Patent on foot simulator device The aim of the PhD is to design loading mechanisms and a phantom foot that enables the mechanical and physiological behaviour of the human foot to be mimicked under realistic conditions. The purpose of this is to enable Scholl product concepts tested in sufficiently realistic in vivo setting that innovation is sped up, risk reduced and new products conceived. The loading mechanism and foot should be modular/adaptable in order to enable variations in foot type (i.e. consumer type), physical activity and footwear, and thus ensure a close fit between consumer market and in vitro testing conditions.

    more_vert
Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

Do the share buttons not appear? Please make sure, any blocking addon is disabled, and then reload the page.

Content report
No reports available
Funder report
No option selected
arrow_drop_down

Do you wish to download a CSV file? Note that this process may take a while.

There was an error in csv downloading. Please try again later.