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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
445 Research products, page 1 of 45

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • 2013-2022
  • Open Access
  • Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine

10
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vuorio, Alpo; Brinck, Jonas; Kovanen, Petri T.;
    Country: Finland

    Based on separate protective mechanisms related to lipid metabolism, viral cell entry and inflammation, fibrate treatment might be advantageous among patients who have been taking fibrates before SARS-CoV-2 infection and continue taking them during the infection. Based on published data on hospitalized COVID-19 patients, we recommend that the clinicians should ask their patients with metabolic syndrome who are already taking fibrates to continue fibrate treatment during the COVID-19 illness. This recommendation applies to both outpatients and hospitalized patients. However, results from the ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using fenofibrate treatment for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 have yet to prove that fenofibrate is clinically significant for this indication. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holmberg, Marcus; Koppatz, Hanna; Jansson, Anders; Hillingso, Jens Georg; Larsen, Peter Noergaard; Lassen, Kristoffer; Sallinen, Ville; Yaqub, Sheraz; Sparrelid, Ernesto;
    Country: Finland

    Non peer reviewed

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fowler, Simon; Galpin, Vashti; Cheney, James;
    Publisher: ACM
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | Skye (682315)

    Modern applications often manage time-varying data. Despite decades of research on temporal databases, which culminated in the addition of temporal data operations into the SQL:2011 standard, temporal data query and manipulation operations are unavailable in most mainstream database management systems, leaving developers with the unenviable task of implementing such functionality from scratch. In this paper, we extend language-integrated query to support writing temporal queries and updates in a uniform host language, with the language performing the required rewriting to emulate temporal capabilities automatically on any standard relational database. We introduce two core languages, 𝜆TLINQ and 𝜆VLINQ, for manipulating transaction time and valid time data respectively, and formalise existing implementation strategies by giving provably correct semantics-preserving translations into a non-temporal core language, 𝜆LINQ. We show how existing work on query normalisation supports a surprisingly simple implementation strategy for sequenced joins. We implement our approach in the Links programming language, and describe a non-trivial case study based on curating COVID-19 statistics.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Olga Pishchukhina;
    Publisher: IATED
    Country: United Kingdom

    In March, 2020 many university programmes worldwide were rapidly redesigned to be delivered fully online as a result of the pandemic impact, that for many was the first experience of teaching and learning in the virtual environment. Higher education institutions had to focus on sustainability of their programmes and courses, that is not considered just as resources provided in digital format. This paper discusses the experience of adapting the MSc Computing Foundations module to the distance learning model using the virtual learning environment (VLE) Canvas at the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EEECS), Queen’s University Belfast in response to the challenges brought to higher education setting by the pandemic. The module is a fundamental compulsory module with over 100 students in the part-time class studying the conversional MSc course in Software Development and had the added challenge of being introduced to a mature audience. This paper reflects on the experiences of learners and changes made to the curriculum to facilitate the move to online module delivery using the conceptual framework for effective online courses delivery, including course design, content delivery, assessment and feedback. Online learning has offered increased opportunity for choice and flexibility for students and to explore how technology can remove barriers in learning for the MSc students. The paper reviews the impact of different curriculum items and online educational activities starting with content delivery – both synchronous and asynchronous – and moving on to VLE Canvas discussion forums, ungraded formative quizzes, in-term formative assessment in the form of mock exam and, finally, to online summative assessment delivered on VLE Canvas for the postgraduate cohort studying part-time. Sustained level of student engagement was evidenced through statistics collected from VLE Canvas that also has helped to adjust the instructor’s approach in teaching and become an integral part of successful module delivery. The paper reflects on student reviews of distance learning, e.g., how the students learn via online content delivery and proposes how the learning experience can be enhanced through their engagement with VLE. The paper focuses on how this effective learning environment contributes to education practice with a view what developments are worth retaining post-pandemic and what did not work well. It represents some practical examples of the applications and techniques that have been developed as a part of curriculum and widely used by students in learning computing subject, improving their computing skills and enhancing their learning experience at the EEECS.As the effects of COVID-19 continued throughout 2021, classroom environments evolved to meet new requirements and patterns in higher education sector, particularly the pattern of distance and online learning. At the start of the 2021-22 academic year many institutions remained fully remote, others took on hybrid environments, and some went fully back to campus. Adaptation of the MSc Computing Foundation module to a new model of distance learning has proved to be successful, and the module has become a distance module delivered fully online for the class with over 120 students in the 2021-22 academic year helping to cope with the new normal in post-pandemic times.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bee-Yen Toh; Neil Buchanan;
    Publisher: IATED
    Country: United Kingdom

    This study examined the effects of online (synchronous) engagement in live lectures versus offline (asynchronous) studies on students’ performance of an undergraduate computer science Databases module with a large class size of over 400 students. As a result of COVID-19, significant teaching activities has moved online at short notice. The traditional view that full lecture attendance equates to better students’ performance in assessments, needs to be challenged. We have discovered that attendance at synchronous (live) online-lectures has very little correlation to students’ performance. Our view is that the change to online learning has caused a considerable shift in study habits. In fact, a significant number of students who had hardly attended any live online-lectures still performed extremely well in the summative assessments, indicating that they were still engaging asynchronously. Using page view data from a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) via CANVAS, we have established correlations to predict students’ performance. Such data can be extremely valuable when monitoring students’ engagement. It can also minimise “false alarms” of students who were perceived to have little commitment due to poor online lecture attendance, but are in fact strongly engaging via other means. To the author’s knowledge, this is one of the first times such a range of data is available for a large class of over 400 students, looking at detailed students’ engagement versus assessment performance. We can conclude that academics need not be overly concerned with low attendance at live online-lectures, as they can use other correlations to predict likely performance in assessments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    ARIA Grp; Hagemann, Jan; Onorato, Gabrielle; Seifen, Christopher; Salmi, Sanna Toppila; Klimek, Ludger; Haahtela, Tari;
    Country: Finland

    Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vuorio, Alpo; Ramaswami, Uma; Holven, Kirsten B.;
    Country: Finland

    Non peer reviewed

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Melanie Duckert; Eve Hoggan; Louise Barkhuus; Pernille Bjørn; Nina Boulus-Rodje; Susanne Bødker; Naja Holten Møller; Irina Shklovski;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.
    Country: Denmark

    Remote and hybrid work has received significant attention in the last years in both academic and industrial contexts, especially due to the COVID-19 pandemic and attendant lockdown. Some of the remaining challenges in current remote technologies include limited embodiment, hierarchy and agency issues, and significant technological limitations. In this workshop, we will, together with the participants, explore how to design socio-technical systems that connect people and artefacts during collaborative activities. The workshop will use provocations, artefacts, and group work to imagine the futures of work with a focus on hybrid work practices.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sarhadi, Pouria; Naeem, Wasif; Fraser, Karen; Wilson, David;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Due to the nature of most postgraduate theses in control engineering and their similarities to industrial and software engineering projects, invoking novel project control techniques could be effective. In recent decades, agile techniques have attracted popularity thanks to their attributes in delivering successful projects. Hence exploiting those methods in education and thesis supervision of engineering topics can facilitate the process. On the other hand, because of the limitations imposed by the CoVid19 pandemic, the integration of well-established online tools in collaborative education is noteworthy. This paper proposes an application of the agile project management method for the supervision of postgraduate students’ theses in the general field of engineering. The study extends a Scrum technique combined with approved systems engineering and team working tools such as Jira Software, Microsoft Teams, and Git version control (Github website). A custom designed V-model to nail an outstanding thesis is presented. The overall blended method is beneficial to provide feedback and self-assessment aid for the students and the supervisors. Employing this technique has shown promising progress in easing the supervision of students whilst helping them to manage their projects.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    De Angeli, Daniela; Frangoudes, Fotos; Avraam, Savvas; Neokleous, Kleanthis; O'Neill, Eamonn;
    Publisher: IEEE
    Country: United Kingdom

    Public displays are some of the most challenging interfaces to design because of two key characteristics. First, the experience should be engaging, to attract and maintain users’ attention. Second, the interaction with the display should be natural, meaning that users should be able to receive the desired output with little or no training. Holographic displays are increasingly popular in public spaces such as museums and concert halls but there is little published research on users’ experiences with such displays. Previous research has suggested both tangible and intangible inputs as engaging and natural options for holographic displays, but there is no conclusive evidence on their relative merits. Hence, we run a study to investigate the user experience with a holographic display comparing the level of engagement and feeling of natural experience in the interacting process. We used a mix of surveys, interviews, video recordings, and task-based metrics to measure users’ performance on a specific task, the perceived usability, and levels of engagement and satisfaction. Our findings suggest that a tangible input was reported as more natural than the intangible one, however, both tangible and intangible inputs were found to be equally engaging. The latter findings contribute to the efforts of designing intangible public holographic displays and other interactive systems that take into consideration health safety issues, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic era in which contamination can be established with tangible and physical interaction between users and public displays, yet without affecting the level of engagement compared to the tangible experience.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
445 Research products, page 1 of 45
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vuorio, Alpo; Brinck, Jonas; Kovanen, Petri T.;
    Country: Finland

    Based on separate protective mechanisms related to lipid metabolism, viral cell entry and inflammation, fibrate treatment might be advantageous among patients who have been taking fibrates before SARS-CoV-2 infection and continue taking them during the infection. Based on published data on hospitalized COVID-19 patients, we recommend that the clinicians should ask their patients with metabolic syndrome who are already taking fibrates to continue fibrate treatment during the COVID-19 illness. This recommendation applies to both outpatients and hospitalized patients. However, results from the ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using fenofibrate treatment for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 have yet to prove that fenofibrate is clinically significant for this indication. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holmberg, Marcus; Koppatz, Hanna; Jansson, Anders; Hillingso, Jens Georg; Larsen, Peter Noergaard; Lassen, Kristoffer; Sallinen, Ville; Yaqub, Sheraz; Sparrelid, Ernesto;
    Country: Finland

    Non peer reviewed

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fowler, Simon; Galpin, Vashti; Cheney, James;
    Publisher: ACM
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | Skye (682315)

    Modern applications often manage time-varying data. Despite decades of research on temporal databases, which culminated in the addition of temporal data operations into the SQL:2011 standard, temporal data query and manipulation operations are unavailable in most mainstream database management systems, leaving developers with the unenviable task of implementing such functionality from scratch. In this paper, we extend language-integrated query to support writing temporal queries and updates in a uniform host language, with the language performing the required rewriting to emulate temporal capabilities automatically on any standard relational database. We introduce two core languages, 𝜆TLINQ and 𝜆VLINQ, for manipulating transaction time and valid time data respectively, and formalise existing implementation strategies by giving provably correct semantics-preserving translations into a non-temporal core language, 𝜆LINQ. We show how existing work on query normalisation supports a surprisingly simple implementation strategy for sequenced joins. We implement our approach in the Links programming language, and describe a non-trivial case study based on curating COVID-19 statistics.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Olga Pishchukhina;
    Publisher: IATED
    Country: United Kingdom

    In March, 2020 many university programmes worldwide were rapidly redesigned to be delivered fully online as a result of the pandemic impact, that for many was the first experience of teaching and learning in the virtual environment. Higher education institutions had to focus on sustainability of their programmes and courses, that is not considered just as resources provided in digital format. This paper discusses the experience of adapting the MSc Computing Foundations module to the distance learning model using the virtual learning environment (VLE) Canvas at the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EEECS), Queen’s University Belfast in response to the challenges brought to higher education setting by the pandemic. The module is a fundamental compulsory module with over 100 students in the part-time class studying the conversional MSc course in Software Development and had the added challenge of being introduced to a mature audience. This paper reflects on the experiences of learners and changes made to the curriculum to facilitate the move to online module delivery using the conceptual framework for effective online courses delivery, including course design, content delivery, assessment and feedback. Online learning has offered increased opportunity for choice and flexibility for students and to explore how technology can remove barriers in learning for the MSc students. The paper reviews the impact of different curriculum items and online educational activities starting with content delivery – both synchronous and asynchronous – and moving on to VLE Canvas discussion forums, ungraded formative quizzes, in-term formative assessment in the form of mock exam and, finally, to online summative assessment delivered on VLE Canvas for the postgraduate cohort studying part-time. Sustained level of student engagement was evidenced through statistics collected from VLE Canvas that also has helped to adjust the instructor’s approach in teaching and become an integral part of successful module delivery. The paper reflects on student reviews of distance learning, e.g., how the students learn via online content delivery and proposes how the learning experience can be enhanced through their engagement with VLE. The paper focuses on how this effective learning environment contributes to education practice with a view what developments are worth retaining post-pandemic and what did not work well. It represents some practical examples of the applications and techniques that have been developed as a part of curriculum and widely used by students in learning computing subject, improving their computing skills and enhancing their learning experience at the EEECS.As the effects of COVID-19 continued throughout 2021, classroom environments evolved to meet new requirements and patterns in higher education sector, particularly the pattern of distance and online learning. At the start of the 2021-22 academic year many institutions remained fully remote, others took on hybrid environments, and some went fully back to campus. Adaptation of the MSc Computing Foundation module to a new model of distance learning has proved to be successful, and the module has become a distance module delivered fully online for the class with over 120 students in the 2021-22 academic year helping to cope with the new normal in post-pandemic times.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bee-Yen Toh; Neil Buchanan;
    Publisher: IATED
    Country: United Kingdom

    This study examined the effects of online (synchronous) engagement in live lectures versus offline (asynchronous) studies on students’ performance of an undergraduate computer science Databases module with a large class size of over 400 students. As a result of COVID-19, significant teaching activities has moved online at short notice. The traditional view that full lecture attendance equates to better students’ performance in assessments, needs to be challenged. We have discovered that attendance at synchronous (live) online-lectures has very little correlation to students’ performance. Our view is that the change to online learning has caused a considerable shift in study habits. In fact, a significant number of students who had hardly attended any live online-lectures still performed extremely well in the summative assessments, indicating that they were still engaging asynchronously. Using page view data from a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) via CANVAS, we have established correlations to predict students’ performance. Such data can be extremely valuable when monitoring students’ engagement. It can also minimise “false alarms” of students who were perceived to have little commitment due to poor online lecture attendance, but are in fact strongly engaging via other means. To the author’s knowledge, this is one of the first times such a range of data is available for a large class of over 400 students, looking at detailed students’ engagement versus assessment performance. We can conclude that academics need not be overly concerned with low attendance at live online-lectures, as they can use other correlations to predict likely performance in assessments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    ARIA Grp; Hagemann, Jan; Onorato, Gabrielle; Seifen, Christopher; Salmi, Sanna Toppila; Klimek, Ludger; Haahtela, Tari;
    Country: Finland

    Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vuorio, Alpo; Ramaswami, Uma; Holven, Kirsten B.;
    Country: Finland

    Non peer reviewed

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Melanie Duckert; Eve Hoggan; Louise Barkhuus; Pernille Bjørn; Nina Boulus-Rodje; Susanne Bødker; Naja Holten Møller; Irina Shklovski;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.
    Country: Denmark

    Remote and hybrid work has received significant attention in the last years in both academic and industrial contexts, especially due to the COVID-19 pandemic and attendant lockdown. Some of the remaining challenges in current remote technologies include limited embodiment, hierarchy and agency issues, and significant technological limitations. In this workshop, we will, together with the participants, explore how to design socio-technical systems that connect people and artefacts during collaborative activities. The workshop will use provocations, artefacts, and group work to imagine the futures of work with a focus on hybrid work practices.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sarhadi, Pouria; Naeem, Wasif; Fraser, Karen; Wilson, David;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Due to the nature of most postgraduate theses in control engineering and their similarities to industrial and software engineering projects, invoking novel project control techniques could be effective. In recent decades, agile techniques have attracted popularity thanks to their attributes in delivering successful projects. Hence exploiting those methods in education and thesis supervision of engineering topics can facilitate the process. On the other hand, because of the limitations imposed by the CoVid19 pandemic, the integration of well-established online tools in collaborative education is noteworthy. This paper proposes an application of the agile project management method for the supervision of postgraduate students’ theses in the general field of engineering. The study extends a Scrum technique combined with approved systems engineering and team working tools such as Jira Software, Microsoft Teams, and Git version control (Github website). A custom designed V-model to nail an outstanding thesis is presented. The overall blended method is beneficial to provide feedback and self-assessment aid for the students and the supervisors. Employing this technique has shown promising progress in easing the supervision of students whilst helping them to manage their projects.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    De Angeli, Daniela; Frangoudes, Fotos; Avraam, Savvas; Neokleous, Kleanthis; O'Neill, Eamonn;
    Publisher: IEEE
    Country: United Kingdom

    Public displays are some of the most challenging interfaces to design because of two key characteristics. First, the experience should be engaging, to attract and maintain users’ attention. Second, the interaction with the display should be natural, meaning that users should be able to receive the desired output with little or no training. Holographic displays are increasingly popular in public spaces such as museums and concert halls but there is little published research on users’ experiences with such displays. Previous research has suggested both tangible and intangible inputs as engaging and natural options for holographic displays, but there is no conclusive evidence on their relative merits. Hence, we run a study to investigate the user experience with a holographic display comparing the level of engagement and feeling of natural experience in the interacting process. We used a mix of surveys, interviews, video recordings, and task-based metrics to measure users’ performance on a specific task, the perceived usability, and levels of engagement and satisfaction. Our findings suggest that a tangible input was reported as more natural than the intangible one, however, both tangible and intangible inputs were found to be equally engaging. The latter findings contribute to the efforts of designing intangible public holographic displays and other interactive systems that take into consideration health safety issues, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic era in which contamination can be established with tangible and physical interaction between users and public displays, yet without affecting the level of engagement compared to the tangible experience.