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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,125 Research products, page 1 of 213

  • COVID-19
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
  • English

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scherer, Ronny; Siddiq, Fazilat; Howard, Sarah K.; Tondeur, Jo;

    In the present study, we tested the common assumption that teachers with more experience consider themselves better prepared for online teaching and learning (OTL). Utilizing the data from a survey of 366 higher-education teachers from Portugal at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, we performed structural equation modeling to quantify the experience-readiness relationship. The survey contained an assessment of teachers' OTL readiness which was measured by their perceptions of the institutional support, online teaching presence, and TPACK self-efficacy. In contrast to the linearity assumption “the more experienced, the better prepared”, we found robust evidence for a curvilinear relationship. Teachers’ readiness for OTL increased first and then decreased with more experience—this applied especially to the self-efficacy dimension of readiness. Further analyses suggested that the experience-readiness relationship does not only exist at the level of aggregated constructs but also at the level of indicators, that is, specific areas of knowledge, teaching, and support. We argue that both novice and experienced teachers in higher education could benefit from experience-appropriate, pedagogical, and content-related support programs for OTL.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cilloni, Lucia; Kendall, Emily; Dowdy, David; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Supporting information for "Adaptive strategies for the deployment of rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19: a modelling study"

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Bock, Ellen; Herman, Eline S.; Bastian, Okan W.; Filipe, Mando D.; Vriens, Menno R.; Richir, Milan C.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: To provide for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) healthcare capacity, (surgical oncology) guidelines were established, forcing to alter the timing of performing surgical procedures. It is essential to determine whether these guidelines have led to disease progression. This study aims to give an insight into the number of surgical oncology procedures performed during the pandemic and provide information on short-term clinical outcomes. Materials and methods: A systematic literature search was performed on all COVID-19 articles including operated patients, published before March 21, 2022. Meta-analysis was performed to visualize the number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period. Random effects models were used for evaluating short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-four studies containing 6762 patients who underwent a surgical oncology procedure during the pandemic were included. The number of performed surgical procedures for an oncological pathology decreased (−26.4%) during the pandemic. The number of performed surgical procedures for breast cancer remained stable (+0.3%). Moreover, no difference was identified in the number of ≥T2 (OR 1.00, P = 0.989), ≥T3 (OR 0.95, P = 0.778), ≥N1 (OR 1.01, P = 0.964) and major postoperative complications (OR 1.55, P = 0.134) during the pandemic. Conclusion: The number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic decreased. In addition, the number of performed surgical breast cancer procedures remained stable. Oncological staging and major postoperative complications showed no significant difference compared to pre-pandemic practice. During future pandemics, the performed surgical oncology practice during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic seems appropriate for short-term results.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johansson, Veronica; Wänström, Linda; Ramme, Kim; Nilsdotter Swartswe, Johanna; Kallio, Sakari;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Template for the Swedish national survey questionnaire directed to long-COVID / post-COVID sufferers in Swedish Facebook groups. The survey comprises questions on demographics, background factors, symptoms and changes over time, health impacts, information needs and practices, and validated scales for rating certain symptoms. The survey was produced for the research project CiLC-S - Crowdsourcing Long-COVID Sweden, and conducted in 2021. The survey is designed for anonymous participation and open digital methods distribution through social media and web channels.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Manz, Xue D.; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Aman, Jurjan;
    Country: Netherlands

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation promotes thrombosis via a VWF (von Willebrand factor)-mediated mechanism. VWF plays an essential role in maintaining the balance between blood coagulation and bleeding, and inflammation can lead to aberrant regulation. VWF is regulated on a transcriptional and (post-)translational level, and its secretion into the circulation captures platelets upon endothelial activation. The significant progress that has been made in understanding transcriptional and translational regulation of VWF is described in this review. First, we describe how VWF is regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level with a specific focus on the influence of inflammatory and immune responses. Next, we describe how changes in regulation are linked with various cardiovascular diseases. Recent insights from clinical diseases provide evidence for direct molecular links between inflammation and thrombosis, including atherosclerosis, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and COVID-19. Finally, we will briefly describe clinical implications for antithrombotic treatment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Singh, Kavita; Kondal, Dimple; Raspail, Lana; Mohan, Bishav; Kato, Toru; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Talukder, Shamim Hayder; Akter, Shahin; Amin, Mohammad Robed; +26 more
    Country: Netherlands

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.5334/gh.1128.].

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Carvalho, Victor Diogho Heuer; Nepomuceno, Thyago Celso Cavalcante; Poleto, Thiago; Costa, Ana Paula Cabral Seixas;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Set of supplementary tables and figures obtained for the analysis of topics in space and time about the Brazilian Immunization Program against COVID-19. These elements are: Table S1: Parameters used in the scraping script; Table S2: Example of the georeferenced corpus, containing the first five rows; Table S3: Cities with at least 300 tweets retrieved; Table S4: The 23 topics extracted using LDA algorithm; Table S5: The 23 topics terms translations (or approximated translations) to English; Table S6: Possible interpretations for each topic; Table S7: Tweets amounts according to each topic; Figure S1: Topic 1 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S2: Topic 2 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S3: Topic 4 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S4: Topic 5 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S5: Topic 6 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S6: Topic 7 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S7: Topic 8 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S9: Topic 10 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S10: Topic 11 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S11: Topic 12 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S12: Topic 14 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S13: Topic 15 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S14: Topic 16 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S15: Topic 17 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S16: Topic 18 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S17: Topic 19 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S18: Topic 20 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S19: Topic 21 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S20: Topic 22 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S21: Topic 23 distribution on the Brazilian territory.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cousson, Anne; El Founti, Amal; Gibson-Morgan, Elizabeth; Guyard-Nedelec, Alexandrine; Mesplède, Sophie; Rivière-De Franco, Karine; Simpkins, Fiona;
    Publisher: Presses universitaires de Rennes

    Since the beginning of the XXIth century, established parliamentary practises have been challenged in Great Britain: weakening of the two-party system, constitutional controversies triggered by the debates on Brexit and experimentation of a virtual Parliament due to the Covid-19 crisis. Moreover in a context of 24-hour news channels, Internet and social media, citizens have been expecting greater transparency in politics. This issue of LISA e-journal explores the legislative practises in both Houses of the Westminster Parliament as well as in the Scottish Parliament. The authors examine parliamentary proceedings, debates on specific issues, as well as the evolution of legislative activity and the need for reform. En Grande-Bretagne, les premières décennies du xxie siècle ont vu la remise en question de fonctionnements parlementaires établis : affaiblissement du bipartisme, controverses constitutionnelles liées au Brexit ou expérimentation d’un Parlement virtuel due à la crise sanitaire. Parallèlement, les chaînes d’information en continu, Internet et les réseaux sociaux ont créé une demande de plus grande transparence de la vie politique chez les citoyens. Ce numéro de la Revue LISA entend examiner les pratiques au sein de la Chambre des Communes et de la Chambre des Lords du Parlement de Westminster, ainsi que le Parlement écossais, et s’interroger sur la nécessité d’une modernisation. Les contributions explorent les procédures législatives, notamment à l’épreuve de certains enjeux spécifiques, leur évolution et les propositions de réformes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evans, Paul C.; Davidson, Sean M.; Wojta, Johann; Bäck, Magnus; Bollini, Sveva; Brittan, Mairi; Catapano, Alberico L.; Chaudhry, Bill; Cluitmans, Matthijs; Gnecchi, Massimiliano; +13 more
    Country: Netherlands

    Here we review the highlights of cardiovascular basic science in published in 2021 and early 2022 on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology Council for Basic Cardiovascular Science. We begin with non-coding RNAs which have emerged as central regulators cardiovascular biology, and then discuss how technological developments in single-cell 'omics are providing new insights in cardiovascular development, inflammation and disease. We also review recent discoveries on the biology of extracellular vesicles in driving either protective or pathogenic responses. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2021 recognised the importance of the molecular basis of mechanosensing and here we review breakthroughs in cardiovascular sensing of mechanical force. We also summarise discoveries in the field of atherosclerosis including the role of clonal haematopoiesis of indeterminate potential, and new mechanisms of cross-talk between hyperglycemia, lipid mediators and inflammation. The past 12 months also witnessed major advances in the field of cardiac arrhythmia including new mechanisms of fibrillation. We also focus on inducible pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology which has demonstrated disease causality for several genetic polymorphisms in long QT syndrome and aortic valve disease, paving the way for personalized medicine approaches. Finally, the cardiovascular community has continued to better understand COVID-19 with significant advancement in our knowledge of cardiovascular tropism, molecular markers, the mechanism of vaccine-induced thrombotic complications and new anti-viral therapies that protect the cardiovascular system.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Keusch, Gerald T.; Amuasi, John H.; Anderson, Danielle E.; Daszak, Peter; Eckerle, Isabella; Field, Hume; Koopmans, Marion; Lam, Sai Kit; Das Neves, Carlos G.; Peiris, Malik; +4 more
    Country: Netherlands

    COVID-19 is the latest zoonotic RNA virus epidemic of concern. Learning how it began and spread will help to determine how to reduce the risk of future events. We review major RNA virus outbreaks since 1967 to identify common features and opportunities to prevent emergence, including ancestral viral origins in birds, bats, and other mammals; animal reservoirs and intermediate hosts; and pathways for zoonotic spillover and community spread, leading to local, regional, or international outbreaks. The increasing scientific evidence concerning the origins of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is most consistent with a zoonotic origin and a spillover pathway from wildlife to people via wildlife farming and the wildlife trade. We apply what we know about these outbreaks to identify relevant, feasible, and implementable interventions. We identify three primary targets for pandemic prevention and preparedness: first, smart surveillance coupled with epidemiological risk assessment across wildlife-livestock-human (One Health) spillover interfaces; second, research to enhance pandemic preparedness and expedite development of vaccines and therapeutics; and third, strategies to reduce underlying drivers of spillover risk and spread and reduce the influence of misinformation. For all three, continued efforts to improve and integrate biosafety and biosecurity with the implementation of a One Health approach are essential. We discuss new models to address the challenges of creating an inclusive and effective governance structure, with the necessary stable funding for cross-disciplinary collaborative research. Finally, we offer recommendations for feasible actions to close the knowledge gaps across the One Health continuum and improve preparedness and response in the future.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,125 Research products, page 1 of 213
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scherer, Ronny; Siddiq, Fazilat; Howard, Sarah K.; Tondeur, Jo;

    In the present study, we tested the common assumption that teachers with more experience consider themselves better prepared for online teaching and learning (OTL). Utilizing the data from a survey of 366 higher-education teachers from Portugal at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, we performed structural equation modeling to quantify the experience-readiness relationship. The survey contained an assessment of teachers' OTL readiness which was measured by their perceptions of the institutional support, online teaching presence, and TPACK self-efficacy. In contrast to the linearity assumption “the more experienced, the better prepared”, we found robust evidence for a curvilinear relationship. Teachers’ readiness for OTL increased first and then decreased with more experience—this applied especially to the self-efficacy dimension of readiness. Further analyses suggested that the experience-readiness relationship does not only exist at the level of aggregated constructs but also at the level of indicators, that is, specific areas of knowledge, teaching, and support. We argue that both novice and experienced teachers in higher education could benefit from experience-appropriate, pedagogical, and content-related support programs for OTL.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cilloni, Lucia; Kendall, Emily; Dowdy, David; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Supporting information for "Adaptive strategies for the deployment of rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19: a modelling study"

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Bock, Ellen; Herman, Eline S.; Bastian, Okan W.; Filipe, Mando D.; Vriens, Menno R.; Richir, Milan C.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: To provide for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) healthcare capacity, (surgical oncology) guidelines were established, forcing to alter the timing of performing surgical procedures. It is essential to determine whether these guidelines have led to disease progression. This study aims to give an insight into the number of surgical oncology procedures performed during the pandemic and provide information on short-term clinical outcomes. Materials and methods: A systematic literature search was performed on all COVID-19 articles including operated patients, published before March 21, 2022. Meta-analysis was performed to visualize the number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period. Random effects models were used for evaluating short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-four studies containing 6762 patients who underwent a surgical oncology procedure during the pandemic were included. The number of performed surgical procedures for an oncological pathology decreased (−26.4%) during the pandemic. The number of performed surgical procedures for breast cancer remained stable (+0.3%). Moreover, no difference was identified in the number of ≥T2 (OR 1.00, P = 0.989), ≥T3 (OR 0.95, P = 0.778), ≥N1 (OR 1.01, P = 0.964) and major postoperative complications (OR 1.55, P = 0.134) during the pandemic. Conclusion: The number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic decreased. In addition, the number of performed surgical breast cancer procedures remained stable. Oncological staging and major postoperative complications showed no significant difference compared to pre-pandemic practice. During future pandemics, the performed surgical oncology practice during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic seems appropriate for short-term results.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johansson, Veronica; Wänström, Linda; Ramme, Kim; Nilsdotter Swartswe, Johanna; Kallio, Sakari;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Template for the Swedish national survey questionnaire directed to long-COVID / post-COVID sufferers in Swedish Facebook groups. The survey comprises questions on demographics, background factors, symptoms and changes over time, health impacts, information needs and practices, and validated scales for rating certain symptoms. The survey was produced for the research project CiLC-S - Crowdsourcing Long-COVID Sweden, and conducted in 2021. The survey is designed for anonymous participation and open digital methods distribution through social media and web channels.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Manz, Xue D.; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Aman, Jurjan;
    Country: Netherlands

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation promotes thrombosis via a VWF (von Willebrand factor)-mediated mechanism. VWF plays an essential role in maintaining the balance between blood coagulation and bleeding, and inflammation can lead to aberrant regulation. VWF is regulated on a transcriptional and (post-)translational level, and its secretion into the circulation captures platelets upon endothelial activation. The significant progress that has been made in understanding transcriptional and translational regulation of VWF is described in this review. First, we describe how VWF is regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level with a specific focus on the influence of inflammatory and immune responses. Next, we describe how changes in regulation are linked with various cardiovascular diseases. Recent insights from clinical diseases provide evidence for direct molecular links between inflammation and thrombosis, including atherosclerosis, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and COVID-19. Finally, we will briefly describe clinical implications for antithrombotic treatment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Singh, Kavita; Kondal, Dimple; Raspail, Lana; Mohan, Bishav; Kato, Toru; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Talukder, Shamim Hayder; Akter, Shahin; Amin, Mohammad Robed; +26 more
    Country: Netherlands

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.5334/gh.1128.].

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Carvalho, Victor Diogho Heuer; Nepomuceno, Thyago Celso Cavalcante; Poleto, Thiago; Costa, Ana Paula Cabral Seixas;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Set of supplementary tables and figures obtained for the analysis of topics in space and time about the Brazilian Immunization Program against COVID-19. These elements are: Table S1: Parameters used in the scraping script; Table S2: Example of the georeferenced corpus, containing the first five rows; Table S3: Cities with at least 300 tweets retrieved; Table S4: The 23 topics extracted using LDA algorithm; Table S5: The 23 topics terms translations (or approximated translations) to English; Table S6: Possible interpretations for each topic; Table S7: Tweets amounts according to each topic; Figure S1: Topic 1 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S2: Topic 2 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S3: Topic 4 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S4: Topic 5 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S5: Topic 6 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S6: Topic 7 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S7: Topic 8 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S9: Topic 10 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S10: Topic 11 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S11: Topic 12 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S12: Topic 14 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S13: Topic 15 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S14: Topic 16 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S15: Topic 17 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S16: Topic 18 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S17: Topic 19 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S18: Topic 20 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S19: Topic 21 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S20: Topic 22 distribution on the Brazilian territory; Figure S21: Topic 23 distribution on the Brazilian territory.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cousson, Anne; El Founti, Amal; Gibson-Morgan, Elizabeth; Guyard-Nedelec, Alexandrine; Mesplède, Sophie; Rivière-De Franco, Karine; Simpkins, Fiona;
    Publisher: Presses universitaires de Rennes

    Since the beginning of the XXIth century, established parliamentary practises have been challenged in Great Britain: weakening of the two-party system, constitutional controversies triggered by the debates on Brexit and experimentation of a virtual Parliament due to the Covid-19 crisis. Moreover in a context of 24-hour news channels, Internet and social media, citizens have been expecting greater transparency in politics. This issue of LISA e-journal explores the legislative practises in both Houses of the Westminster Parliament as well as in the Scottish Parliament. The authors examine parliamentary proceedings, debates on specific issues, as well as the evolution of legislative activity and the need for reform. En Grande-Bretagne, les premières décennies du xxie siècle ont vu la remise en question de fonctionnements parlementaires établis : affaiblissement du bipartisme, controverses constitutionnelles liées au Brexit ou expérimentation d’un Parlement virtuel due à la crise sanitaire. Parallèlement, les chaînes d’information en continu, Internet et les réseaux sociaux ont créé une demande de plus grande transparence de la vie politique chez les citoyens. Ce numéro de la Revue LISA entend examiner les pratiques au sein de la Chambre des Communes et de la Chambre des Lords du Parlement de Westminster, ainsi que le Parlement écossais, et s’interroger sur la nécessité d’une modernisation. Les contributions explorent les procédures législatives, notamment à l’épreuve de certains enjeux spécifiques, leur évolution et les propositions de réformes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evans, Paul C.; Davidson, Sean M.; Wojta, Johann; Bäck, Magnus; Bollini, Sveva; Brittan, Mairi; Catapano, Alberico L.; Chaudhry, Bill; Cluitmans, Matthijs; Gnecchi, Massimiliano; +13 more
    Country: Netherlands

    Here we review the highlights of cardiovascular basic science in published in 2021 and early 2022 on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology Council for Basic Cardiovascular Science. We begin with non-coding RNAs which have emerged as central regulators cardiovascular biology, and then discuss how technological developments in single-cell 'omics are providing new insights in cardiovascular development, inflammation and disease. We also review recent discoveries on the biology of extracellular vesicles in driving either protective or pathogenic responses. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2021 recognised the importance of the molecular basis of mechanosensing and here we review breakthroughs in cardiovascular sensing of mechanical force. We also summarise discoveries in the field of atherosclerosis including the role of clonal haematopoiesis of indeterminate potential, and new mechanisms of cross-talk between hyperglycemia, lipid mediators and inflammation. The past 12 months also witnessed major advances in the field of cardiac arrhythmia including new mechanisms of fibrillation. We also focus on inducible pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology which has demonstrated disease causality for several genetic polymorphisms in long QT syndrome and aortic valve disease, paving the way for personalized medicine approaches. Finally, the cardiovascular community has continued to better understand COVID-19 with significant advancement in our knowledge of cardiovascular tropism, molecular markers, the mechanism of vaccine-induced thrombotic complications and new anti-viral therapies that protect the cardiovascular system.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Keusch, Gerald T.; Amuasi, John H.; Anderson, Danielle E.; Daszak, Peter; Eckerle, Isabella; Field, Hume; Koopmans, Marion; Lam, Sai Kit; Das Neves, Carlos G.; Peiris, Malik; +4 more
    Country: Netherlands

    COVID-19 is the latest zoonotic RNA virus epidemic of concern. Learning how it began and spread will help to determine how to reduce the risk of future events. We review major RNA virus outbreaks since 1967 to identify common features and opportunities to prevent emergence, including ancestral viral origins in birds, bats, and other mammals; animal reservoirs and intermediate hosts; and pathways for zoonotic spillover and community spread, leading to local, regional, or international outbreaks. The increasing scientific evidence concerning the origins of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is most consistent with a zoonotic origin and a spillover pathway from wildlife to people via wildlife farming and the wildlife trade. We apply what we know about these outbreaks to identify relevant, feasible, and implementable interventions. We identify three primary targets for pandemic prevention and preparedness: first, smart surveillance coupled with epidemiological risk assessment across wildlife-livestock-human (One Health) spillover interfaces; second, research to enhance pandemic preparedness and expedite development of vaccines and therapeutics; and third, strategies to reduce underlying drivers of spillover risk and spread and reduce the influence of misinformation. For all three, continued efforts to improve and integrate biosafety and biosecurity with the implementation of a One Health approach are essential. We discuss new models to address the challenges of creating an inclusive and effective governance structure, with the necessary stable funding for cross-disciplinary collaborative research. Finally, we offer recommendations for feasible actions to close the knowledge gaps across the One Health continuum and improve preparedness and response in the future.