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407 Research products, page 1 of 41

  • COVID-19
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  • 2017-2021
  • English
  • Copenhagen University Research Information System
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Erika Olivia Boyesen; Ida Maria Balsby; Marius Henriksen; Robin Christensen; Jens Henning Rasmussen; Finn Erland Nielsen; Hanne Nygaard; Lennart Jan Friis-Hansen; Susanne Dam Nielsen; Rebekka Faber Thudium; +3 more
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
    Country: Denmark

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has prognostic value in hospitalized patients with COVID-19; the importance of CRP in pre-hospitalized patients remains to be tested. Methods: Individuals with symptoms of COVID-19 had a SARS-CoV-2 PCR oropharyngeal swab test, and a measurement of CRP was performed at baseline, with an upper reference range of 10 mg/L. After 28 days, information about possible admissions, oxygen treatments, transfers to the ICU, or deaths was obtained from the patient files. Using logistic regression, the prognostic value of the CRP and SARS-CoV-2 test results was evaluated. Results: Among the 1006 patients included, the SARS-CoV-2 PCR test was positive in 59, and the CRP level was elevated (>10 mg/L) in 131. In total, 59 patients were hospitalized, only 3 of whom were SARS-CoV-2 positive, with elevated CRP (n = 2) and normal CRP (n = 1). The probability of being hospitalized with elevated CRP was 4.21 (95%CI 2.38–7.43, p p = 0.79). Conclusions: CRP is not a reliable predictor for the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pre-hospitalized patients. CRP, while not a SARS-CoV-2 positive test, had prognostic value in the total population of patients presenting with COVID-19-related symptoms.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frederik Mølgaard Nielsen; Thomas Lass Klitgaard; Anders Granholm; Theis Lange; Anders Perner; Olav Lilleholt Schjørring; Bodil Steen Rasmussen;
    Country: Denmark

    Background: Respiratory failure is the main cause of mortality and morbidity among ICU patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In these patients, supplemental oxygen therapy is essential, but there is limited evidence the optimal target. To address this, the ongoing handling oxygenation targets in COVID-19 (HOT-COVID) trial was initiated to investigate the effect of a lower oxygenation target (partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) of 8 kPa) versus a higher oxygenation target (PaO2 of 12 kPa) in the ICU on clinical outcome in patients with COVID-19 and hypoxaemia. Methods: The HOT-COVID is planned to enrol 780 patients. This paper presents the protocol and statistical analysis plan for the conduct of a secondary Bayesian analysis of the primary outcome of HOT-COVID being days alive without life-support at 90 days and the secondary outcome 90-day all-cause mortality. Furthermore, both outcomes will be investigated for the presence heterogeneity of treatment effects based on four baseline parameters being sequential organ failure assessment score, PaO2/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio, highest dose of norepinephrine during the 24 h before randomisation, and plasma concentration of lactate at randomisation. Conclusion: The results of this pre-planned secondary Bayesian analysis will complement the primary frequentist analysis of the HOT-COVID trial and may facilitate a more nuanced interpretation of the trial results.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lotte Broberg; Ane L. Rom; Mie G. Wolff; Stinne Høgh; Nina O. Nathan; Louise D. Paarlberg; Karl B. Christensen; Peter Damm; Hanne Kristine Hegaard;
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction: A pandemic may negatively influence psychological well-being in the individual. We aimed to assess the potential influence of the first national lockdown in Denmark (March to June 2020) due to the COVID-19 pandemic on psychological well-being and the content and degree of worries among pregnant women in early pregnancy. Material and methods: In this hospital-based cross-sectional study based on self-reported data we compared psychological well-being and worries among women who were pregnant during the first phase of the pandemic (COVID-19 group) (n = 685), with women who were pregnant the year before (Historical group) (n = 787). Psychological well-being was measured by the five-item World Health Organization Well-being Index (WHO-5), using a score ≤50 as indicator of reduced psychological well-being. Differences in WHO-5 mean scores and in the prevalence of women with score ≤50 were assessed using general linear and log-binomial regression analyses. The Cambridge Worry Scale was used to measure the content and degree of major worries. To detect differences between groups, Pearson’s Chi-square test was used. Results: We found no differences in mean WHO-5 score between groups (mean difference) 0.1 (95% CI −1.5 to 1.6) or in the prevalence of women with WHO-5 score ≤50 (prevalence ratio 1.04, 95% CI 0.83–1.29) in adjusted analyses. A larger proportion of women in the COVID-19 group reported major worries about Relationship with husband/partner compared with the Historical group (3% [n = 19] vs 1% [n = 6], p = 0.04), and 9.2% in the COVID-19 group worried about the possible negative influence of the COVID-19 restrictions. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that national restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic did not influence the psychological well-being or the content and degree of major worries among pregnant women. However, a larger proportion of women in the COVID-19 group reported major worries concerning Relationship with husband/partner compared with the Historical group and 9.2% in the COVID-19 group worried about the possible negative influence of the COVID-19 restrictions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Megan Maurer; Megan Maurer; Elizabeth M. Cook; Liv Yoon; Olivia Visnic; Ben Orlove; Patricia J. Culligan; Brian J. Mailloux;
    Country: Denmark

    The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated how the accessibility of greenspace can shift in response to social-ecological disturbance, and generated questions as to how changing dimensions of accessibility affect the ecosystem services of greenspace, such as improved subjective well-being. Amidst the growing consensus of the important role of greenspace in improving and maintaining well-being through times of duress, we examine how access to greenspace is affecting subjective well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Both the relationship of greenspace to subjective well-being and the barriers to greenspace access are well-established for normal conditions. Much remains to be known, however, about how barriers to access and the effect of greenspace on subjective well-being shift in response to periods of social duress, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic. Using data from surveys and interviews conducted with 1,200 university students in the United States during the spring of 2020, we assess the effect of going outdoors on subjective well-being, commonly experienced barriers to going outside, and how these barriers in turn affected subjective well-being. We find that time spent outside, particularly in greenspace, correlates with higher levels of subjective well-being, and that concern over COVID-19 risk and transmission negatively affects this relationship both in reducing time spent outdoors and the subjective well-being benefits. We also find that type of greenspace (public vs. private) does not have a significant effect on subjective well-being, that while those in areas with lower population density have significantly higher subjective well-being when outdoors, all participants experience a statistically equal benefit to subjective well-being by going outside. Our findings suggest how understanding the ways dimensions of accessibility shift in response to times of social duress can aid public health messaging, the design and management of greenspace, and environmental justice efforts to support the use of greenspace in improving and maintaining subjective well-being during future crisis events.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kamille Fogh; Jarl E. Strange; Bibi F. S. S. Scharff; Alexandra R. R. Eriksen; Rasmus B. Hasselbalch; Henning Bundgaard; Susanne D. Nielsen; Charlotte S. Jørgensen; Christian Erikstrup; Jakob Norsk; +24 more
    Country: Denmark

    "Testing Denmark" is a national, large-scale, epidemiological surveillance study of SARS-CoV-2 in the Danish population. Between September and October 2020, approximately 1.3 million people (age >15 years) were randomly invited to fill in an electronic questionnaire covering COVID-19 exposures and symptoms. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was determined by point-of care rapid test (POCT) distributed to participants' home addresses. In total, 318,552 participants (24.5% invitees) completed the study and 2,519 (0.79%) were seropositive. Of the participants with a prior positive PCR test (n = 1,828), 29.1% were seropositive in the POCT. Although seropositivity increased with age, participants 61 years and over reported fewer symptoms and were tested less frequently. Seropositivity was associated with physical contact with SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals (risk ratio [RR] 7.43, 95% CI: 6.57-8.41), particular in household members (RR 17.70, 95% CI: 15.60-20.10). A greater risk of seropositivity was seen in home care workers (RR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.58-2.78) compared to office workers. A high degree of adherence with national preventive recommendations was reported (e.g., >80% use of face masks), but no difference were found between seropositive and seronegative participants. The seroprevalence result was somewhat hampered by a lower-than-expected performance of the POCT. This is likely due to a low sensitivity of the POCT or problems reading the test results, and the main findings therefore relate to risk associations. More emphasis should be placed on age, occupation, and exposure in local communities. IMPORTANCE To date, including 318,522 participants, this is the largest population-based study with broad national participation where tests and questionnaires have been sent to participants' homes. We found that more emphasis from national and local authorities toward the risk of infection should be placed on age of tested individuals, type of occupation, as well as exposure in local communities and households. To meet the challenge that broad nationwide information can be difficult to gather. This study design sets the stage for a novel way of conducting studies. Additionally, this study design can be used as a supplementary model in future general test strategy for ongoing monitoring of COVID-19 immunity in the population, both from past infection and from vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, however, with attention to the complexity of performing and reading the POCT at home.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lesley Scott; Nei-yuan Hsiao; Sikhuline Moyo; Lavanya Singh; Houriiyah Tegally; Graeme Dor; Piet Maes; Oliver G. Pybus; Moritz U. G. Kraemer; Elizaveta Semenova; +4 more
    Publisher: AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jon Dyg Sperling; Jon Dyg Sperling; Nina Dalkner; Christina Berndt; Eva Fleischmann; Michaela Ratzenhofer; Julia Martini; Andrea Pfennig; Michael Bauer; Eva Reininghaus; +2 more
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increased psychological strain on public mental health and may impact behavioural, mental, and physical health, presumably with effects on patients with severe mental disorders. Objectives This study examines pandemic-related physical and mental health and (compensatory) behavioural changes, in patients with BD as compared to healthy control individuals. Methods Physical and mental health and self-reported changes in daily structure and behaviour due to pandemic were assessed using a self-constructed questionnaire and the brief symptom inventory (BSI) from outpatient clinics in Germany, Austria, and Denmark in individuals with BD and a healthy control group. Results The present study included 118 individuals with BD and 215 healthy controls. Individuals with BD reported statistically significant higher physical risk burden, increased weight gain, more physical comorbidities, and a decrease in physical activity and they further reported higher rate of COVID-19 testing, had more worries concerning health and experienced more anxiety but less social distancing. Conclusions The COVID-19 pandemic seems to have a greater impact on physical health in individuals with BD than in healthy controls. Individuals with BD appear to be having more difficulties compensating their behaviour due to the pandemic which could amplify the effect of risk factors associated with poorer physical health. This highlights the necessity for optimising and targeting the overall treatment of both mental and physical health in patients with BD during periods with far-reaching changes such as COVID-19 pandemic. Disclosure No significant relationships.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ola Andersson; Pol Campos-Mercade; Armando N. Meier; Erik Wengström;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, UCFS
    Countries: Denmark, Switzerland, Sweden

    We investigate how the anticipation of COVID-19 vaccines affects voluntary social distancing. In a large-scale preregistered survey experiment with a representative sample, we study whetherproviding information about the safety, effectiveness, and availability of COVID-19 vaccines affects the willingness to comply with public health guidelines. We find that vaccine informationreduces peoples’ voluntary social distancing, adherence to hygiene guidelines, and their willingness to stay at home. Getting positive information on COVID-19 vaccines induces people tobelieve in a swifter return to normal life. The results indicate an important behavioral drawback of successful vaccine development: An increased focus on vaccines can lower compliance withpublic health guidelines and accelerate the spread of infectious disease. The results imply that, as vaccinations roll out and the end of a pandemic feels closer, policies aimed at increasing socialdistancing will be less effective, and stricter policies might be required.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Chatzikonstantinou; Anargyros Kapetanakis; Lydia Scarfò; Georgios Karakatsoulis; David Allsup; Alejandro Alonso Cabrero; Martin Andres; Darko Antic; Mónica Baile; Panagiotis Baliakas; +103 more
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Experimentell och klinisk onkologi
    Countries: Denmark, Italy, Denmark, Spain, Sweden, Italy, Switzerland, Netherlands, Belgium

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be more susceptible to Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to age, disease, and treatment-related immunosuppression. We aimed to assess risk factors of outcome and elucidate the impact of CLL-directed treatments on the course of COVID-19. We conducted a retrospective, international study, collectively including 941 patients with CLL and confirmed COVID-19. Data from the beginning of the pandemic until March 16, 2021, were collected from 91 centers. The risk factors of case fatality rate (CFR), disease severity, and overall survival (OS) were investigated. OS analysis was restricted to patients with severe COVID-19 (definition: hospitalization with need of oxygen or admission into an intensive care unit). CFR in patients with severe COVID-19 was 38.4%. OS was inferior for patients in all treatment categories compared to untreated (p < 0.001). Untreated patients had a lower risk of death (HR = 0.54, 95% CI:0.41-0.72). The risk of death was higher for older patients and those suffering from cardiac failure (HR = 1.03, 95% CI:1.02-1.04; HR = 1.79, 95% CI:1.04-3.07, respectively). Age, CLL-directed treatment, and cardiac failure were significant risk factors of OS. Untreated patients had a better chance of survival than those on treatment or recently treated. ispartof: LEUKEMIA vol:35 issue:12 pages:3444-3454 ispartof: location:England status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Trine Lisberg Toft-Bertelsen; Mads G. Jeppesen; Eva Tzortzini; Kai Xue; Karin Giller; Stefan Becker; Amer Mujezinovic; Bo Hjorth Bentzen; Loren B. Andreas; Antonios Kolocouris; +2 more
    Country: Denmark

    The dire need for COVID-19 treatments has inspired strategies of repurposing approved drugs. Amantadine has been suggested as a candidate, and cellular as well as clinical studies have indicated beneficial effects of this drug. We demonstrate that amantadine and hexamethylene-amiloride (HMA), but not rimantadine, block the ion channel activity of Protein E from SARS-CoV-2, a conserved viroporin among coronaviruses. These findings agree with their binding to Protein E as evaluated by solution NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. Moreover, we identify two novel viroporins of SARS-CoV-2; ORF7b and ORF10, by showing ion channel activity in a X. laevis oocyte expression system. Notably, amantadine also blocks the ion channel activity of ORF10, thereby providing two ion channel targets in SARS-CoV-2 for amantadine treatment in COVID-19 patients. A screen of known viroporin inhibitors on Protein E, ORF7b, ORF10 and Protein 3a from SARS-CoV-2 revealed inhibition of Protein E and ORF7b by emodin and xanthene, the latter also blocking Protein 3a. This illustrates a general potential of well-known ion channel blockers against SARS-CoV-2 and specifically a dual molecular basis for the promising effects of amantadine in COVID-19 treatment. Toft-Bertelsen et al. describe repurposing of anti-influenza drug amantadine and its derivatives for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2. They show that Amantadine, Emodin and Xanthene show significant blockage of ionchannels formed by SARS-CoV-2 which are crucial for its assembly and pathophysiology.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
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Searching FieldsTerms
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Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
407 Research products, page 1 of 41
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Erika Olivia Boyesen; Ida Maria Balsby; Marius Henriksen; Robin Christensen; Jens Henning Rasmussen; Finn Erland Nielsen; Hanne Nygaard; Lennart Jan Friis-Hansen; Susanne Dam Nielsen; Rebekka Faber Thudium; +3 more
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
    Country: Denmark

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has prognostic value in hospitalized patients with COVID-19; the importance of CRP in pre-hospitalized patients remains to be tested. Methods: Individuals with symptoms of COVID-19 had a SARS-CoV-2 PCR oropharyngeal swab test, and a measurement of CRP was performed at baseline, with an upper reference range of 10 mg/L. After 28 days, information about possible admissions, oxygen treatments, transfers to the ICU, or deaths was obtained from the patient files. Using logistic regression, the prognostic value of the CRP and SARS-CoV-2 test results was evaluated. Results: Among the 1006 patients included, the SARS-CoV-2 PCR test was positive in 59, and the CRP level was elevated (>10 mg/L) in 131. In total, 59 patients were hospitalized, only 3 of whom were SARS-CoV-2 positive, with elevated CRP (n = 2) and normal CRP (n = 1). The probability of being hospitalized with elevated CRP was 4.21 (95%CI 2.38–7.43, p p = 0.79). Conclusions: CRP is not a reliable predictor for the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pre-hospitalized patients. CRP, while not a SARS-CoV-2 positive test, had prognostic value in the total population of patients presenting with COVID-19-related symptoms.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frederik Mølgaard Nielsen; Thomas Lass Klitgaard; Anders Granholm; Theis Lange; Anders Perner; Olav Lilleholt Schjørring; Bodil Steen Rasmussen;
    Country: Denmark

    Background: Respiratory failure is the main cause of mortality and morbidity among ICU patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In these patients, supplemental oxygen therapy is essential, but there is limited evidence the optimal target. To address this, the ongoing handling oxygenation targets in COVID-19 (HOT-COVID) trial was initiated to investigate the effect of a lower oxygenation target (partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) of 8 kPa) versus a higher oxygenation target (PaO2 of 12 kPa) in the ICU on clinical outcome in patients with COVID-19 and hypoxaemia. Methods: The HOT-COVID is planned to enrol 780 patients. This paper presents the protocol and statistical analysis plan for the conduct of a secondary Bayesian analysis of the primary outcome of HOT-COVID being days alive without life-support at 90 days and the secondary outcome 90-day all-cause mortality. Furthermore, both outcomes will be investigated for the presence heterogeneity of treatment effects based on four baseline parameters being sequential organ failure assessment score, PaO2/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio, highest dose of norepinephrine during the 24 h before randomisation, and plasma concentration of lactate at randomisation. Conclusion: The results of this pre-planned secondary Bayesian analysis will complement the primary frequentist analysis of the HOT-COVID trial and may facilitate a more nuanced interpretation of the trial results.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lotte Broberg; Ane L. Rom; Mie G. Wolff; Stinne Høgh; Nina O. Nathan; Louise D. Paarlberg; Karl B. Christensen; Peter Damm; Hanne Kristine Hegaard;
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction: A pandemic may negatively influence psychological well-being in the individual. We aimed to assess the potential influence of the first national lockdown in Denmark (March to June 2020) due to the COVID-19 pandemic on psychological well-being and the content and degree of worries among pregnant women in early pregnancy. Material and methods: In this hospital-based cross-sectional study based on self-reported data we compared psychological well-being and worries among women who were pregnant during the first phase of the pandemic (COVID-19 group) (n = 685), with women who were pregnant the year before (Historical group) (n = 787). Psychological well-being was measured by the five-item World Health Organization Well-being Index (WHO-5), using a score ≤50 as indicator of reduced psychological well-being. Differences in WHO-5 mean scores and in the prevalence of women with score ≤50 were assessed using general linear and log-binomial regression analyses. The Cambridge Worry Scale was used to measure the content and degree of major worries. To detect differences between groups, Pearson’s Chi-square test was used. Results: We found no differences in mean WHO-5 score between groups (mean difference) 0.1 (95% CI −1.5 to 1.6) or in the prevalence of women with WHO-5 score ≤50 (prevalence ratio 1.04, 95% CI 0.83–1.29) in adjusted analyses. A larger proportion of women in the COVID-19 group reported major worries about Relationship with husband/partner compared with the Historical group (3% [n = 19] vs 1% [n = 6], p = 0.04), and 9.2% in the COVID-19 group worried about the possible negative influence of the COVID-19 restrictions. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that national restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic did not influence the psychological well-being or the content and degree of major worries among pregnant women. However, a larger proportion of women in the COVID-19 group reported major worries concerning Relationship with husband/partner compared with the Historical group and 9.2% in the COVID-19 group worried about the possible negative influence of the COVID-19 restrictions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Megan Maurer; Megan Maurer; Elizabeth M. Cook; Liv Yoon; Olivia Visnic; Ben Orlove; Patricia J. Culligan; Brian J. Mailloux;
    Country: Denmark

    The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated how the accessibility of greenspace can shift in response to social-ecological disturbance, and generated questions as to how changing dimensions of accessibility affect the ecosystem services of greenspace, such as improved subjective well-being. Amidst the growing consensus of the important role of greenspace in improving and maintaining well-being through times of duress, we examine how access to greenspace is affecting subjective well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Both the relationship of greenspace to subjective well-being and the barriers to greenspace access are well-established for normal conditions. Much remains to be known, however, about how barriers to access and the effect of greenspace on subjective well-being shift in response to periods of social duress, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic. Using data from surveys and interviews conducted with 1,200 university students in the United States during the spring of 2020, we assess the effect of going outdoors on subjective well-being, commonly experienced barriers to going outside, and how these barriers in turn affected subjective well-being. We find that time spent outside, particularly in greenspace, correlates with higher levels of subjective well-being, and that concern over COVID-19 risk and transmission negatively affects this relationship both in reducing time spent outdoors and the subjective well-being benefits. We also find that type of greenspace (public vs. private) does not have a significant effect on subjective well-being, that while those in areas with lower population density have significantly higher subjective well-being when outdoors, all participants experience a statistically equal benefit to subjective well-being by going outside. Our findings suggest how understanding the ways dimensions of accessibility shift in response to times of social duress can aid public health messaging, the design and management of greenspace, and environmental justice efforts to support the use of greenspace in improving and maintaining subjective well-being during future crisis events.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kamille Fogh; Jarl E. Strange; Bibi F. S. S. Scharff; Alexandra R. R. Eriksen; Rasmus B. Hasselbalch; Henning Bundgaard; Susanne D. Nielsen; Charlotte S. Jørgensen; Christian Erikstrup; Jakob Norsk; +24 more
    Country: Denmark

    "Testing Denmark" is a national, large-scale, epidemiological surveillance study of SARS-CoV-2 in the Danish population. Between September and October 2020, approximately 1.3 million people (age >15 years) were randomly invited to fill in an electronic questionnaire covering COVID-19 exposures and symptoms. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was determined by point-of care rapid test (POCT) distributed to participants' home addresses. In total, 318,552 participants (24.5% invitees) completed the study and 2,519 (0.79%) were seropositive. Of the participants with a prior positive PCR test (n = 1,828), 29.1% were seropositive in the POCT. Although seropositivity increased with age, participants 61 years and over reported fewer symptoms and were tested less frequently. Seropositivity was associated with physical contact with SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals (risk ratio [RR] 7.43, 95% CI: 6.57-8.41), particular in household members (RR 17.70, 95% CI: 15.60-20.10). A greater risk of seropositivity was seen in home care workers (RR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.58-2.78) compared to office workers. A high degree of adherence with national preventive recommendations was reported (e.g., >80% use of face masks), but no difference were found between seropositive and seronegative participants. The seroprevalence result was somewhat hampered by a lower-than-expected performance of the POCT. This is likely due to a low sensitivity of the POCT or problems reading the test results, and the main findings therefore relate to risk associations. More emphasis should be placed on age, occupation, and exposure in local communities. IMPORTANCE To date, including 318,522 participants, this is the largest population-based study with broad national participation where tests and questionnaires have been sent to participants' homes. We found that more emphasis from national and local authorities toward the risk of infection should be placed on age of tested individuals, type of occupation, as well as exposure in local communities and households. To meet the challenge that broad nationwide information can be difficult to gather. This study design sets the stage for a novel way of conducting studies. Additionally, this study design can be used as a supplementary model in future general test strategy for ongoing monitoring of COVID-19 immunity in the population, both from past infection and from vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, however, with attention to the complexity of performing and reading the POCT at home.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lesley Scott; Nei-yuan Hsiao; Sikhuline Moyo; Lavanya Singh; Houriiyah Tegally; Graeme Dor; Piet Maes; Oliver G. Pybus; Moritz U. G. Kraemer; Elizaveta Semenova; +4 more
    Publisher: AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jon Dyg Sperling; Jon Dyg Sperling; Nina Dalkner; Christina Berndt; Eva Fleischmann; Michaela Ratzenhofer; Julia Martini; Andrea Pfennig; Michael Bauer; Eva Reininghaus; +2 more
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increased psychological strain on public mental health and may impact behavioural, mental, and physical health, presumably with effects on patients with severe mental disorders. Objectives This study examines pandemic-related physical and mental health and (compensatory) behavioural changes, in patients with BD as compared to healthy control individuals. Methods Physical and mental health and self-reported changes in daily structure and behaviour due to pandemic were assessed using a self-constructed questionnaire and the brief symptom inventory (BSI) from outpatient clinics in Germany, Austria, and Denmark in individuals with BD and a healthy control group. Results The present study included 118 individuals with BD and 215 healthy controls. Individuals with BD reported statistically significant higher physical risk burden, increased weight gain, more physical comorbidities, and a decrease in physical activity and they further reported higher rate of COVID-19 testing, had more worries concerning health and experienced more anxiety but less social distancing. Conclusions The COVID-19 pandemic seems to have a greater impact on physical health in individuals with BD than in healthy controls. Individuals with BD appear to be having more difficulties compensating their behaviour due to the pandemic which could amplify the effect of risk factors associated with poorer physical health. This highlights the necessity for optimising and targeting the overall treatment of both mental and physical health in patients with BD during periods with far-reaching changes such as COVID-19 pandemic. Disclosure No significant relationships.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ola Andersson; Pol Campos-Mercade; Armando N. Meier; Erik Wengström;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, UCFS
    Countries: Denmark, Switzerland, Sweden

    We investigate how the anticipation of COVID-19 vaccines affects voluntary social distancing. In a large-scale preregistered survey experiment with a representative sample, we study whetherproviding information about the safety, effectiveness, and availability of COVID-19 vaccines affects the willingness to comply with public health guidelines. We find that vaccine informationreduces peoples’ voluntary social distancing, adherence to hygiene guidelines, and their willingness to stay at home. Getting positive information on COVID-19 vaccines induces people tobelieve in a swifter return to normal life. The results indicate an important behavioral drawback of successful vaccine development: An increased focus on vaccines can lower compliance withpublic health guidelines and accelerate the spread of infectious disease. The results imply that, as vaccinations roll out and the end of a pandemic feels closer, policies aimed at increasing socialdistancing will be less effective, and stricter policies might be required.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Chatzikonstantinou; Anargyros Kapetanakis; Lydia Scarfò; Georgios Karakatsoulis; David Allsup; Alejandro Alonso Cabrero; Martin Andres; Darko Antic; Mónica Baile; Panagiotis Baliakas; +103 more
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Experimentell och klinisk onkologi
    Countries: Denmark, Italy, Denmark, Spain, Sweden, Italy, Switzerland, Netherlands, Belgium

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be more susceptible to Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to age, disease, and treatment-related immunosuppression. We aimed to assess risk factors of outcome and elucidate the impact of CLL-directed treatments on the course of COVID-19. We conducted a retrospective, international study, collectively including 941 patients with CLL and confirmed COVID-19. Data from the beginning of the pandemic until March 16, 2021, were collected from 91 centers. The risk factors of case fatality rate (CFR), disease severity, and overall survival (OS) were investigated. OS analysis was restricted to patients with severe COVID-19 (definition: hospitalization with need of oxygen or admission into an intensive care unit). CFR in patients with severe COVID-19 was 38.4%. OS was inferior for patients in all treatment categories compared to untreated (p < 0.001). Untreated patients had a lower risk of death (HR = 0.54, 95% CI:0.41-0.72). The risk of death was higher for older patients and those suffering from cardiac failure (HR = 1.03, 95% CI:1.02-1.04; HR = 1.79, 95% CI:1.04-3.07, respectively). Age, CLL-directed treatment, and cardiac failure were significant risk factors of OS. Untreated patients had a better chance of survival than those on treatment or recently treated. ispartof: LEUKEMIA vol:35 issue:12 pages:3444-3454 ispartof: location:England status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Trine Lisberg Toft-Bertelsen; Mads G. Jeppesen; Eva Tzortzini; Kai Xue; Karin Giller; Stefan Becker; Amer Mujezinovic; Bo Hjorth Bentzen; Loren B. Andreas; Antonios Kolocouris; +2 more
    Country: Denmark

    The dire need for COVID-19 treatments has inspired strategies of repurposing approved drugs. Amantadine has been suggested as a candidate, and cellular as well as clinical studies have indicated beneficial effects of this drug. We demonstrate that amantadine and hexamethylene-amiloride (HMA), but not rimantadine, block the ion channel activity of Protein E from SARS-CoV-2, a conserved viroporin among coronaviruses. These findings agree with their binding to Protein E as evaluated by solution NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. Moreover, we identify two novel viroporins of SARS-CoV-2; ORF7b and ORF10, by showing ion channel activity in a X. laevis oocyte expression system. Notably, amantadine also blocks the ion channel activity of ORF10, thereby providing two ion channel targets in SARS-CoV-2 for amantadine treatment in COVID-19 patients. A screen of known viroporin inhibitors on Protein E, ORF7b, ORF10 and Protein 3a from SARS-CoV-2 revealed inhibition of Protein E and ORF7b by emodin and xanthene, the latter also blocking Protein 3a. This illustrates a general potential of well-known ion channel blockers against SARS-CoV-2 and specifically a dual molecular basis for the promising effects of amantadine in COVID-19 treatment. Toft-Bertelsen et al. describe repurposing of anti-influenza drug amantadine and its derivatives for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2. They show that Amantadine, Emodin and Xanthene show significant blockage of ionchannels formed by SARS-CoV-2 which are crucial for its assembly and pathophysiology.