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5,141 Research products, page 1 of 515

  • COVID-19
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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anikó Lovik; Juan González-Hijón; Anna K. Kähler; Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir; Emma M. Frans; Patrik K.E. Magnusson; Nancy L. Pedersen; Per Hall; Kamila Czene; Patrick F. Sullivan; +1 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | CoMorMent (847776)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jäger, J.; Brutschin, E.; Pianta, S.; Omann, I.; Kammerlander, M.; Sudharmma Vishwanathan, S.; Vrontisi, Z.; MacDonald, J.; van Ruijven, B.;
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | ENGAGE (821471)

    Climate change is an extremely complex challenge characterized by its systemic nature and deep uncertainties. Thus, finding solutions requires a continuing and constructive dialogue between the research community and a wide range of stakeholders from governments, non-governmental organizations, civil society, international organizations, industry, businesses and financial institutions. The ENGAGE project (https://www.engage-climate.org/) is advancing knowledge co-production through an iterative process of stakeholder engagement with two main streams: (i) stakeholder co-design and assessment of global decarbonization pathways and (ii) stakeholder dialogues on national policies and pathways. Both the global and national stakeholder processes are designed to inform multiple project activities, including: conceptualization of feasibility and assessing the feasibility of decarbonization policies and strategies; decarbonization pathway development using integrated assessment models and considering both feasibility and equity; and assessment of the relative importance of climate change impacts vis-à -vis potential co-benefits. With the start of the COVID-19 pandemic six months after the beginning of the project, all of the stakeholder engagement activities had to be organized as online events. Between March 2020 and April 2022, 5 online workshops were organized, two at the global level and 3 at the regional/national level. This paper documents how the challenges of effectively engaging stakeholders in a co-design and dialogue process in an online setting have been met through a process of evaluation and learning that led to the introduction of new approaches and tools to support an inclusive exploration and development of low-carbon transition pathways. We show that a combination of interactive visualizations, open channel surveys and moderated breakout groups are particularly useful tools for online stakeholder engagement. The learning that has taken place through the use of these tools is demonstrated with reference to both the research team (e.g., learning about stakeholders� views on the feasibility of decarbonization pathways) and the stakeholders (e.g. learning about experiences in other countries in dealing with the challenges of decarbonization). Despite several advantages of online engagement, such as the expanded geographical coverage and reduced CO2 emissions, the need to keep online meetings short means that important elements of face-to-face meetings cannot be included.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aurélien Sokal; Paul Bastard; Pascal Chappert; Giovanna Barba-Spaeth; Slim Fourati; Alexis Vanderberghe; Pauline Lagouge-Roussey; Isabelle Meyts; Adrian Gervais; Magali Bouvier-Alias; +42 more
    Publisher: ROCKEFELLER UNIV PRESS
    Countries: France, Belgium
    Project: EC | EASI-Genomics (824110), EC | MORE2ADA2 (948959)

    Inborn and acquired deficits of type I interferon (IFN) immunity predispose to life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. We longitudinally profiled the B cell response to mRNA vaccination in SARS-CoV-2 naive patients with inherited TLR7, IRF7, or IFNAR1 deficiency, as well as young patients with autoantibodies neutralizing type I IFNs due to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) and older individuals with age-associated autoantibodies to type I IFNs. The receptor-binding domain spike protein (RBD)-specific memory B cell response in all patients was quantitatively and qualitatively similar to healthy donors. Sustained germinal center responses led to accumulation of somatic hypermutations in immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. The amplitude and duration of, and viral neutralization by, RBD-specific IgG serological response were also largely unaffected by TLR7, IRF7, or IFNAR1 deficiencies up to 7 mo after vaccination in all patients. These results suggest that induction of type I IFN is not required for efficient generation of a humoral response against SARS-CoV-2 by mRNA vaccines. ispartof: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE vol:220 issue:1 ispartof: location:United States status: published

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hicham Meskher; Hussain Chaudhery Mustansar; Amrit Kumar Thakur; Ravishankar Sathyamurthy; Iseult Lynch; Punit Singh; Tan Kim Han; Rahman Saidur;
    Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
    Project: EC | NanoSolveIT (814572), EC | NanoCommons (731032)

    Sensitive and selective detection of SARS-CoV-2 using carbon nanotube (CNTs)-based biosensors for fast, robust and cheap diagnosis of infection to support pandemic management.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gregory Eady; Anne Rasmussen;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Project: EC | ADVODID (864648)

    AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic is viewed by many as the biggest global crisis since WWII and had profound effects on the daily lives of people and decision-making worldwide. Using the pandemic as a system-wide agenda shock, we employ a difference-in-differences design to estimate its causal effects on inequalities in political access, and social media prominence among business interests and NGOs. Our argument is twofold. First, the urgency and uncertainty of crises incentivized decision-makers to privilege providing access to business groups over securing inclusivity in the types of interests consulted. Second, NGOs compensated by increasing prominence in public communications. Our analysis of data from over 10,000 interest groups from over 100 countries registered in the European Union supports these hypotheses. Business interests successfully capitalized on the crisis in insider access, while NGOs increased prominence on social media. The results have wider implications for understanding how large-scale crises affect inequalities in representation.

  • Publication . Project deliverable . Other literature type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Katrine Joensen;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | One Health EJP (773830)

    The initial plan of an integrated, easily accessible platform for sharing, visualising and analysing data was not possible due to time limitations, COVID-19, personnel changes and delays in the similar concurrent Danish project SOFI. Therefore, the final solution became a backend independent dashboard, which is possible to get locally on your computer. Furthermore, a datahub was developed. The datahub is a full web application which can read a MongoDB (database) structured in the BeONE MongoDB schema provided by WP3. In the datahub it is possible to see both your own samples as well as samples that other institutes have shared.

  • Publication . Project deliverable . Other literature type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joensen, Katrine;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | One Health EJP (773830)

    The initial plan of an integrated, easily accessible platform for sharing, visualising and analysing data was not possible due to time limitations, COVID-19, personnel changes and delays in the similar concurrent Danish project SOFI. Therefore, the final solution became a backend independent dashboard, which is possible to get locally on your computer. Furthermore, a datahub was developed. The datahub is a full web application which can read a MongoDB (database) structured in the BeONE MongoDB schema provided by WP3. In the datahub it is possible to see both your own samples as well as samples that other institutes have shared.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Amy O’Donnell; Peter Anderson; Christiane Schmidt; Fleur Braddick; Hugo Lopez-Pelayo; Juliana Mejía-Trujillo; Guillermina Natera; Miriam Arroyo; Natalia Bautista; Marina Piazza; +6 more
    Countries: Peru, Netherlands
    Project: EC | SCALA (778048)

    BACKGROUND: Effective interventions exist for heavy drinking and depression but to date there has been limited translation into routine practice in global health systems. This evidence-to-practice gap is particularly evident in low- and middle-income countries. The international SCALA project (Scale-up of Prevention and Management of Alcohol Use Disorders and Comorbid Depression in Latin America) sought to test the impact of multilevel implementation strategies on rates of primary health care-based measurement of alcohol consumption and identification of depression in Colombia, Mexico, and Peru. OBJECTIVE: To describe the process of development and cultural adaptation of the clinical intervention and training package. METHODS: We drew on Barrero and Castro's four-stage cultural adaption model: 1) information gathering, 2) preliminary adaption, 3) preliminary adaption tests, and 4) adaption refinement. The Tailored Implementation in Chronic Diseases checklist helped us identify potential factors that could affect implementation, with local stakeholder groups established to support the tailoring process, as per the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Going to Scale Framework. RESULTS: In Stage 1, international best practice guidelines for preventing heavy drinking and depression, and intelligence on the local implementation context, were synthesised to provide an outline clinical intervention and training package. In Stage 2, feedback was gathered from local stakeholders and materials refined accordingly. These materials were piloted with local trainers in Stage 3, leading to further refinements including developing additional tools to support delivery in busy primary care settings. Stage 4 comprised further adaptions in response to real-world implementation, a period that coincided with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, including translating the intervention and training package for online delivery, and higher priority for depression screening in the clinical pathway. CONCLUSION: Our experience highlights the importance of meaningful engagement with local communities, alongside the need for continuous tailoring and adaptation, and collaborative decision-making.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bardi, Alessia; Kuchma, Iryna; Brobov, Evgeny; Truccolo, Ivana; Monteiro, Elizabete; Casalegno, Carlotta; Clary, Erin; Romanowski, Andrew; Pavone, Gina; Artini, Michele; +19 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: Germany, Italy
    Project: EC | OpenAIRE Nexus (101017452), EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541)

    This dump provides access to the metadata records of publications, research data, software and projects that may be relevant to the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) fight. The dump contains records of the OpenAIRE COVID-19 Gateway, identified via full-text mining and inference techniques applied to the OpenAIRE Research Graph. The Graph is one of the largest Open Access collections of metadata records and links between publications, datasets, software, projects, funders, and organizations, aggregating 12,000+ scientific data sources world-wide, among which the Covid-19 data sources Zenodo COVID-19 Community, WHO (World Health Organization), BIP! FInder for COVID-19, Protein Data Bank, Dimensions, scienceOpen, and RSNA. The dump consists of a tar archive containing gzip files with one json per line. Each json is compliant to the schema available at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4723499.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nathalie Bajos;
    Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
    Project: EC | ORCHESTRA (101016167), EC | GENDHI (856478)

    In France, the first pandemic peak fell disproportionately on the most disadvantaged, as they were overrepresented in contaminations and in developing severe forms of the virus. At that time, and especially during lockdown, the French healthcare system was severely disrupted and limited. The issue of social differences in the use of healthcare by people experiencing symptoms of Covid-19 arose. Based on a random sample of 135,000 persons, we selected respondents who reported Covid-19-like symptoms (cough, fever, dyspnea, anosmia and/or ageusia) during the first lockdown (n = 12,422). The aim of this study was to determine if the use of health care services was likely to contribute to widen Covid-19 social inequalities. Use of health care services was classified in three categories: (1) no consultation, (2) out-of-hospital consultation(s) and (3) in-hospital consultation(s). We estimated odds ratio of utilization of health care using multinomial regressions, adjusted on social factors (age, gender, class, ethno-racial status, social class, standard of living and education), contextual variables, health variables, and symptoms characteristics. Altogether, 37.8% of the individuals consulted a doctor for their symptoms; 32.1% outside hospital and 5.7% in hospital. Use of health care services was strongly associated with social position2: the most disadvantaged social groups and racially minoritized immigrants were more likely to use health care, particularly for in-hospital consultation(s). The highest utilization of health care were found among older adults (OR 9.51, 95%CI 5.02–18.0 compared to the youngest age group), the racially minoritized first-generation immigrants (OR 1.61, 95%CI 1.09–2.36 compared to the mainstream population), the poorest (OR 1.31, 95%CI 1.00–1.72) and the least educated (OR 2.20, 95%CI 1.44–3.38). To conclude, we found that the use of health care services counteracted the potential impact of social inequalities in exposure and infection to the Covid-19.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
5,141 Research products, page 1 of 515
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anikó Lovik; Juan González-Hijón; Anna K. Kähler; Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir; Emma M. Frans; Patrik K.E. Magnusson; Nancy L. Pedersen; Per Hall; Kamila Czene; Patrick F. Sullivan; +1 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | CoMorMent (847776)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jäger, J.; Brutschin, E.; Pianta, S.; Omann, I.; Kammerlander, M.; Sudharmma Vishwanathan, S.; Vrontisi, Z.; MacDonald, J.; van Ruijven, B.;
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | ENGAGE (821471)

    Climate change is an extremely complex challenge characterized by its systemic nature and deep uncertainties. Thus, finding solutions requires a continuing and constructive dialogue between the research community and a wide range of stakeholders from governments, non-governmental organizations, civil society, international organizations, industry, businesses and financial institutions. The ENGAGE project (https://www.engage-climate.org/) is advancing knowledge co-production through an iterative process of stakeholder engagement with two main streams: (i) stakeholder co-design and assessment of global decarbonization pathways and (ii) stakeholder dialogues on national policies and pathways. Both the global and national stakeholder processes are designed to inform multiple project activities, including: conceptualization of feasibility and assessing the feasibility of decarbonization policies and strategies; decarbonization pathway development using integrated assessment models and considering both feasibility and equity; and assessment of the relative importance of climate change impacts vis-à -vis potential co-benefits. With the start of the COVID-19 pandemic six months after the beginning of the project, all of the stakeholder engagement activities had to be organized as online events. Between March 2020 and April 2022, 5 online workshops were organized, two at the global level and 3 at the regional/national level. This paper documents how the challenges of effectively engaging stakeholders in a co-design and dialogue process in an online setting have been met through a process of evaluation and learning that led to the introduction of new approaches and tools to support an inclusive exploration and development of low-carbon transition pathways. We show that a combination of interactive visualizations, open channel surveys and moderated breakout groups are particularly useful tools for online stakeholder engagement. The learning that has taken place through the use of these tools is demonstrated with reference to both the research team (e.g., learning about stakeholders� views on the feasibility of decarbonization pathways) and the stakeholders (e.g. learning about experiences in other countries in dealing with the challenges of decarbonization). Despite several advantages of online engagement, such as the expanded geographical coverage and reduced CO2 emissions, the need to keep online meetings short means that important elements of face-to-face meetings cannot be included.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aurélien Sokal; Paul Bastard; Pascal Chappert; Giovanna Barba-Spaeth; Slim Fourati; Alexis Vanderberghe; Pauline Lagouge-Roussey; Isabelle Meyts; Adrian Gervais; Magali Bouvier-Alias; +42 more
    Publisher: ROCKEFELLER UNIV PRESS
    Countries: France, Belgium
    Project: EC | EASI-Genomics (824110), EC | MORE2ADA2 (948959)

    Inborn and acquired deficits of type I interferon (IFN) immunity predispose to life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. We longitudinally profiled the B cell response to mRNA vaccination in SARS-CoV-2 naive patients with inherited TLR7, IRF7, or IFNAR1 deficiency, as well as young patients with autoantibodies neutralizing type I IFNs due to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) and older individuals with age-associated autoantibodies to type I IFNs. The receptor-binding domain spike protein (RBD)-specific memory B cell response in all patients was quantitatively and qualitatively similar to healthy donors. Sustained germinal center responses led to accumulation of somatic hypermutations in immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. The amplitude and duration of, and viral neutralization by, RBD-specific IgG serological response were also largely unaffected by TLR7, IRF7, or IFNAR1 deficiencies up to 7 mo after vaccination in all patients. These results suggest that induction of type I IFN is not required for efficient generation of a humoral response against SARS-CoV-2 by mRNA vaccines. ispartof: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE vol:220 issue:1 ispartof: location:United States status: published

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hicham Meskher; Hussain Chaudhery Mustansar; Amrit Kumar Thakur; Ravishankar Sathyamurthy; Iseult Lynch; Punit Singh; Tan Kim Han; Rahman Saidur;
    Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
    Project: EC | NanoSolveIT (814572), EC | NanoCommons (731032)

    Sensitive and selective detection of SARS-CoV-2 using carbon nanotube (CNTs)-based biosensors for fast, robust and cheap diagnosis of infection to support pandemic management.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gregory Eady; Anne Rasmussen;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Project: EC | ADVODID (864648)

    AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic is viewed by many as the biggest global crisis since WWII and had profound effects on the daily lives of people and decision-making worldwide. Using the pandemic as a system-wide agenda shock, we employ a difference-in-differences design to estimate its causal effects on inequalities in political access, and social media prominence among business interests and NGOs. Our argument is twofold. First, the urgency and uncertainty of crises incentivized decision-makers to privilege providing access to business groups over securing inclusivity in the types of interests consulted. Second, NGOs compensated by increasing prominence in public communications. Our analysis of data from over 10,000 interest groups from over 100 countries registered in the European Union supports these hypotheses. Business interests successfully capitalized on the crisis in insider access, while NGOs increased prominence on social media. The results have wider implications for understanding how large-scale crises affect inequalities in representation.

  • Publication . Project deliverable . Other literature type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Katrine Joensen;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | One Health EJP (773830)

    The initial plan of an integrated, easily accessible platform for sharing, visualising and analysing data was not possible due to time limitations, COVID-19, personnel changes and delays in the similar concurrent Danish project SOFI. Therefore, the final solution became a backend independent dashboard, which is possible to get locally on your computer. Furthermore, a datahub was developed. The datahub is a full web application which can read a MongoDB (database) structured in the BeONE MongoDB schema provided by WP3. In the datahub it is possible to see both your own samples as well as samples that other institutes have shared.

  • Publication . Project deliverable . Other literature type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joensen, Katrine;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | One Health EJP (773830)

    The initial plan of an integrated, easily accessible platform for sharing, visualising and analysing data was not possible due to time limitations, COVID-19, personnel changes and delays in the similar concurrent Danish project SOFI. Therefore, the final solution became a backend independent dashboard, which is possible to get locally on your computer. Furthermore, a datahub was developed. The datahub is a full web application which can read a MongoDB (database) structured in the BeONE MongoDB schema provided by WP3. In the datahub it is possible to see both your own samples as well as samples that other institutes have shared.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Amy O’Donnell; Peter Anderson; Christiane Schmidt; Fleur Braddick; Hugo Lopez-Pelayo; Juliana Mejía-Trujillo; Guillermina Natera; Miriam Arroyo; Natalia Bautista; Marina Piazza; +6 more
    Countries: Peru, Netherlands
    Project: EC | SCALA (778048)

    BACKGROUND: Effective interventions exist for heavy drinking and depression but to date there has been limited translation into routine practice in global health systems. This evidence-to-practice gap is particularly evident in low- and middle-income countries. The international SCALA project (Scale-up of Prevention and Management of Alcohol Use Disorders and Comorbid Depression in Latin America) sought to test the impact of multilevel implementation strategies on rates of primary health care-based measurement of alcohol consumption and identification of depression in Colombia, Mexico, and Peru. OBJECTIVE: To describe the process of development and cultural adaptation of the clinical intervention and training package. METHODS: We drew on Barrero and Castro's four-stage cultural adaption model: 1) information gathering, 2) preliminary adaption, 3) preliminary adaption tests, and 4) adaption refinement. The Tailored Implementation in Chronic Diseases checklist helped us identify potential factors that could affect implementation, with local stakeholder groups established to support the tailoring process, as per the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Going to Scale Framework. RESULTS: In Stage 1, international best practice guidelines for preventing heavy drinking and depression, and intelligence on the local implementation context, were synthesised to provide an outline clinical intervention and training package. In Stage 2, feedback was gathered from local stakeholders and materials refined accordingly. These materials were piloted with local trainers in Stage 3, leading to further refinements including developing additional tools to support delivery in busy primary care settings. Stage 4 comprised further adaptions in response to real-world implementation, a period that coincided with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, including translating the intervention and training package for online delivery, and higher priority for depression screening in the clinical pathway. CONCLUSION: Our experience highlights the importance of meaningful engagement with local communities, alongside the need for continuous tailoring and adaptation, and collaborative decision-making.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bardi, Alessia; Kuchma, Iryna; Brobov, Evgeny; Truccolo, Ivana; Monteiro, Elizabete; Casalegno, Carlotta; Clary, Erin; Romanowski, Andrew; Pavone, Gina; Artini, Michele; +19 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: Germany, Italy
    Project: EC | OpenAIRE Nexus (101017452), EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541)

    This dump provides access to the metadata records of publications, research data, software and projects that may be relevant to the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) fight. The dump contains records of the OpenAIRE COVID-19 Gateway, identified via full-text mining and inference techniques applied to the OpenAIRE Research Graph. The Graph is one of the largest Open Access collections of metadata records and links between publications, datasets, software, projects, funders, and organizations, aggregating 12,000+ scientific data sources world-wide, among which the Covid-19 data sources Zenodo COVID-19 Community, WHO (World Health Organization), BIP! FInder for COVID-19, Protein Data Bank, Dimensions, scienceOpen, and RSNA. The dump consists of a tar archive containing gzip files with one json per line. Each json is compliant to the schema available at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4723499.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nathalie Bajos;
    Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
    Project: EC | ORCHESTRA (101016167), EC | GENDHI (856478)

    In France, the first pandemic peak fell disproportionately on the most disadvantaged, as they were overrepresented in contaminations and in developing severe forms of the virus. At that time, and especially during lockdown, the French healthcare system was severely disrupted and limited. The issue of social differences in the use of healthcare by people experiencing symptoms of Covid-19 arose. Based on a random sample of 135,000 persons, we selected respondents who reported Covid-19-like symptoms (cough, fever, dyspnea, anosmia and/or ageusia) during the first lockdown (n = 12,422). The aim of this study was to determine if the use of health care services was likely to contribute to widen Covid-19 social inequalities. Use of health care services was classified in three categories: (1) no consultation, (2) out-of-hospital consultation(s) and (3) in-hospital consultation(s). We estimated odds ratio of utilization of health care using multinomial regressions, adjusted on social factors (age, gender, class, ethno-racial status, social class, standard of living and education), contextual variables, health variables, and symptoms characteristics. Altogether, 37.8% of the individuals consulted a doctor for their symptoms; 32.1% outside hospital and 5.7% in hospital. Use of health care services was strongly associated with social position2: the most disadvantaged social groups and racially minoritized immigrants were more likely to use health care, particularly for in-hospital consultation(s). The highest utilization of health care were found among older adults (OR 9.51, 95%CI 5.02–18.0 compared to the youngest age group), the racially minoritized first-generation immigrants (OR 1.61, 95%CI 1.09–2.36 compared to the mainstream population), the poorest (OR 1.31, 95%CI 1.00–1.72) and the least educated (OR 2.20, 95%CI 1.44–3.38). To conclude, we found that the use of health care services counteracted the potential impact of social inequalities in exposure and infection to the Covid-19.