Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
325 Research products, page 1 of 33

  • COVID-19
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2012-2021
  • English
  • PAHO COVID19

10
arrow_drop_down
Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English

    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious acute respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus. The World Health Organization (WHO) was informed of cases of pneumonia of unknown microbial aetiology associated with Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China on 31 December 2019. The WHO later announced that a novel coronavirus had been detected in samples taken from these patients. Since then, the epidemic has escalated and rapidly spread around the world, with the WHO first declaring a public health emergency of international concern on 30 January 2020, and then formally declaring it a pandemic on 11 March 2020. Clinical trials and investigations to learn more about the virus, its origin, how it affects humans, and its management are ongoing.

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English

    What is this? If a patient has comorbidities, such as diabetes, this may affect their risk of contracting COVID-19 and the severity of their disease. Several rapid reviews are summarised here. For more details including citations and links to the full reviews, please scroll down this page. What was found: Pre-existing diabetes is associated with a higher risk of severe disease and mortality in COVID-19 patients. There is some indication that age influences the increased risk of COVID-19 in people with diabetes, but the evidence from the included reviews is conflicting. Studies included in the Chowdhury review (search done up to 31 May 2020) identified a low risk of death from COVID-19 for type I diabetes patients under 40 years of age, but the Huang review (search done on 8 April 2020) found that the association between diabetes and poor COVID-19 outcomes was stronger in younger patients. The Chowdhury review (search done up to 31 May 2020) found that diabetes was associated with an increased risk of infection generally but that there was uncertainty about whether type 1 diabetes increases the risk of COVID-19 infection. The authors suggested optimising glycaemic control to help with primary prevention and improving outcomes for COVID-19 patients with type 1 diabetes.

  • Open Access English
  • Open Access English

    Sarah Chapman highlights Cochrane evidence on COVID-19 and other health effects of the pandemic, with links to reviews, blogs and other Cochrane resources. While we’ve all been adapting to huge and sudden changes in our lives and healthcare workers have been meeting unprecedented challenges, scientists have scrambled to produce research evidence relevant to the pandemic. Cochrane is responding by producing rapid reviews of this new evidence on priority topics, and these are updated as new evidence emerges. They show that much of the research that has been done so far leaves us with more unanswered questions than answers, but we must hope that this changes as new studies are available to add to the reviews.

  • Open Access English

    The guideline covers the care of people who have signs and symptoms that develop during or after an infection consistent with COVID-19, that continue for more than 4 weeks and are not explained by an alternative diagnosis. It provides recommendations based on the current evidence and expert consensus, and will be adapted as new evidence emerges. Most people’s symptoms of COVID-19 resolve within 12 weeks. However, for a sizeable minority of people symptoms can persist or new ones develop, and can sometimes worsen, and have a continuing negative impact on their quality of life. Longer term impacts can include shortness of breath, fatigue, and problems involving the heart, lungs, kidneys, nervous system and muscles and joints.

  • Open Access English

    This guideline covers identifying, assessing and managing the long-term effects of COVID-19, often described as ‘long COVID’. It makes recommendations about care in all healthcare settings for adults, children and young people who have new or ongoing symptoms 4 weeks or more after the start of acute COVID-19. It also includes advice on organising services for long COVID.

  • Open Access English

    Summary of rapid systematic reviews, from the 8th edition of the document and above.

  • Open Access English

    What is this? Many research articles have been published about diagnostic features for COVID-19 infection, such as those found with computerised tomography (CT) imaging of the chest. Several rapid reviews are summarised here. More details on each review, including citations and links to the full text, are available further down this web page. What was found: At the time of these reviews, the included studies showed that chest CT imaging has high sensitivity but low specificity for diagnosing COVID-19 infection and the reviews mostly recommended that chest CT not be used as a first-line tool for this diagnosis. However, the Shao review (search done on 7 June 2020) concluded that CT is capable of detecting COVID-19 infection earlier in the infectious course than RT-PCR laboratory tests and concluded that, among surgical patients, chest CT be considered as an additional diagnostic measure before surgery for detecting COVID-19 infection in patients who are symptomatic but have tested negative with RT-PCR. In general, these reviews found that Ground-Glass Opacities (GGO) and consolidation was often reported by CT and pathological signs of COVID-19 were often found in multiple lung lobes and bilaterally. The Xu (search done on 31 March 2020) and Lv reviews (search done on 31 March 2020) reported that lower lobes were frequently affected, and the Wan review (search done on 15 March 2020) reported that most patients in the studies in their review had CT abnormalities noted in the right lower lobe.

  • Open Access English

    What is this? The COVID-19 pandemic is placing a psychological and psychosocial burden on patients and wider society. Several reviews of the mental health impacts of COVID-19 and other pandemics are summarised here. More details, including citations and links to the full reviews, are available lower down this page. What was found: In addition to the impact of COVID-19 infection, pandemic-associated measures, such as quarantine, isolation and social distancing can have negative impacts on the mental health of patients and others. Two rapid reviews found that isolation and quarantine are linked with negative mental health outcomes (such as anxiety, depression, isolation and stigmatisation). At the time of their review, the studies included by Röhr (search done on 30 March 2020) showed that important factors contributing to adverse effects of quarantine include its duration and income loss. They also showed that healthcare workers are more likely to experience negative psychosocial impacts, particularly stigmatisation. The Hossain review (search done up to 10 March 2020) found that mental health impacts of isolation and quarantine can continue over a prolonged period. [...]

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English

    What is this? Smokers are more vulnerable to infectious diseases and smoking can worsen the prognosis of people with respiratory diseases, such as COVID-19. Findings from several relevant rapid reviews are summarised here. More details, including citations and links to the reviews, are available further down this page. What was found: The reviews found a paucity of data about smoking and COVID-19 but they suggest that smoking, which is an avoidable risk factor, was associated with worse outcomes for COVID-19 patients. The Grundy review of reviews (search done on 8 May 2020) found an increased risk of developing severe COVID-19 in patients who had ever smoked. The Patanavanich review (search done on 28 April 2020) found that smoking increases the risk of severe infection and complications related to COVID-19. Smokers were approximately twice as likely to progress to severe or critical disease or death. The Farsalinos review (search done up to 25 April 2020) found that current smokers had a higher risk of adverse outcomes than non-smokers but a lower risk than former smokers. The Vardaras review (search done on 17 March 2020) reported that current or previous smokers with COVID-19 infection were more likely to be admitted to an intensive care unit, receive mechanical ventilation and die from the COVID-19 (compared to COVID-19 patients who did not smoke). [...]