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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
14 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • COVID-19
  • Research data
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • English
  • Open Repository and Bibliography - Luxembourg
  • Hal-Diderot
  • COVID-19

10
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pauly, Laure; Paccoud, Ivana; Satagopam, Venkata; Ghosh, Soumyabrata; Fritz, Joëlle; O'Sullivan, Marc; Rommes, Basile; Wilmes, Paul; Krüger, Rejko; Leist, Anja;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Background: High vaccination coverage rates are necessary to reduce infections and transmissions of the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19 and to allow successful mitigation of the current pandemic. To date, we are still lacking information to explain the hesitancy in Luxembourg towards uptake of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The present study explored motivations for and against vaccination in a population-representative sample of residents across Luxembourg to identify hesitant groups and develop strategies to increase population immunity against SARS-CoV-2. Methods: In the framework of the nationwide, representative longitudinal CON-VINCE study, a sample of 1589 respondents (49.6% women, 84.3% Luxembourg nationality) ranging from 18-84 years, participated in the survey in spring 2021. The protocol of the CON-VINCE study has been described in detail elsewhere (Snoeck et al. 2020). Results: 52% of the respondents had at least partial vaccination at time of assessment between April to June 2021. The most common reasons for vaccination of those willing to be vaccinated (81.2%) were altruistic motivations. Prevalent reasons against vaccination for those undecided (8.7%) or reluctant (10.2%) to be vaccinated were that the vaccine had not been tested sufficiently and the fear of long-term vaccine side effects. Only very few of the vaccination-hesitant or -reluctant respondents reported that they did not believe in vaccination in general. Conclusion: The present study identified motivations for and against COVID-19 vaccination and determined demographic and socio-economic factors associated with vaccination willingness. To increase vaccination rates, public health communication needs to target those unsure or unwilling to be vaccinated. We will continue to study the vaccination uptake in the Luxembourg population, as CON-VINCE is now part of the H2020-funded international ORCHESTRA project (https://orchestra-cohort.eu), research into comparing these results on a Pan-European level.

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Country: Luxembourg

    All papers are available open access on the journal's website.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, Mccarthy; Delepine, Ludovic; Deschamps, Étienne;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sölter, Jan; Proverbio, Daniele; Baniasadi, Mehri; Bossa, Matias Nicolas; Vlasov, Vanja; Garcia Santa Cruz, Beatriz; Husch, Andreas;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Our working hypothesis is that key factors in COVID-19 imaging are the available imaging data and their label noise and confounders, rather than network architectures per se. Thus, we applied existing state-of-the-art convolution neural network frameworks based on the U-Net architecture, namely nnU-Net [3], and focused on leveraging the available training data. We did not apply any pre-training nor modi ed the network architecture. First, we enriched training information by generating two additional labels for lung and body area. Lung labels were created with a public available lung segmentation network and weak body labels were generated by thresholding. Subsequently, we trained three di erent multi-class networks: 2-label (original background and lesion labels), 3-label (additional lung label) and 4-label (additional lung and body label). The 3-label obtained the best single network performance in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.756) and on the leaderboard (Dice- Score 0.755, Haussdor 95-Score 57.5). To improve robustness, we created a weighted ensemble of all three models, with calibrated weights to optimise the ranking in Dice-Score. This ensemble achieved a slight performance gain in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.760). On the validation set leaderboard, it improved our Dice-Score to 0.768 and Haussdor 95- Score to 54.8. It ranked 3rd in phase I according to mean Dice-Score. Adding unlabelled data from the public TCIA dataset in a student-teacher manner signi cantly improved our internal validation score (Dice-Score of 0.770). However, we noticed partial overlap between our additional training data (although not human-labelled) and nal test data and therefore submitted the ensemble without additional data, to yield realistic assessments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gruodytė-Račienė, R.; Čapkauskienė, S.; Pokvytytė, V.; Avgerinos, A.; Thrasyvoulos, T.; Douka, S.; Heck, Sandra; García-Roca, J.A.; von Seelen, J.;
    Country: Luxembourg

    The lifestyle of children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic has been affected dramatically by restrictions, causing a substantial decrease in physical activity (PA) and extensive increase in sedentary activity time (Xiang et al. 2020). The purpose of this study was to investigate PA and lifestyle habits of adolescent students in a sample of European countries involved in the SUGAPAS project (Supporting Gamified Physical Activities in & out of Schools), an Erasmus+ funded project aiming to design and implement mobile games which should trigger students’ health-related habitual behavior.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Germes, Mélina;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    This text is a report about the "Sex Drugs and the City" Event. // Only the half of the “Sex, Drugs and the City” event could take place. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we had to cancel the participative discussion planned for the broader public in the evening. The academic afternoon took place on October 22, 2020, in Bordeaux under the title “Alcohol and drugs in affective or sexual relationships: transactions, consent, grey zones?” A video recording of the event is available in French via the Narcotic City webpage. “Alcohol and Drugs in Affective or Sexual Relationships: Transactions, Consent, Grey Zones?”

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Welter, Danielle; Vega Moreno, Carlos Gonzalo; Biryukov, Maria; Groues, Valentin; Ghosh, Soumyabrata; Schneider, Reinhard; Satagopam, Venkata;
    Country: Luxembourg

    When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in early 2020, a lot of research efforts were quickly redirected towards studies on SARS-CoV2 and COVID-19 disease, from the sequencing and assembly of viral genomes to the elaboration of robust testing methodologies and the development of treatment and vaccination strategies. At the same time, a flurry of scientific publications around SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 began to appear, making it increasingly difficult for researchers to stay up-to-date with latest trends and developments in this rapidly evolving field. The BioKB platform is a pipeline which, by exploiting text mining and semantic technologies, helps researchers easily access semantic content of thousands of abstracts and full text articles. The content of the articles is analysed and concepts from a range of contexts, including proteins, species, chemicals, diseases and biological processes are tagged based on existing dictionaries of controlled terms. Co-occurring concepts are classified based on their asserted relationship and the resulting subject-relation-object triples are stored in a publicly accessible human- and machine-readable knowledge base. All concepts in the BioKB dictionaries are linked to stable, persistent identifiers, either a resource accession such as an Ensembl, Uniprot or PubChem ID for genes, proteins and chemicals, or an ontology term ID for diseases, phenotypes and other ontology terms. In order to improve COVID-19 related text mining, we extended the underlying dictionaries to include many additional viral species (via NCBI Taxonomy identifiers), phenotypes from the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO), COVID-related concepts including clinical and laboratory tests from the COVID-19 ontology, as well as additional diseases (DO) and biological processes (GO). We also added all viral proteins found in UniProt and gene entries from EntrezGene to increase the sensitivity of the text mining pipeline to viral data. To date, BioKB has indexed over 270’000 sentences from 21’935 publications relating to coronavirus infections, with publications dating from 1963 to 2021, 3’863 of which were published this year. We are currently working to further refine the text mining pipeline by training it on the extraction of increasingly complex relations such as protein-phenotype relationships. We are also regularly adding new terms to our dictionaries for areas where coverage is currently low, such as clinical and laboratory tests and procedures and novel drug treatments.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vitello, Piergiorgio; Capponi, Andrea; Klopp, Pol; Connors, Richard; Viti, Francesco; Fiandrino, Claudio;
    Country: Luxembourg

    As a response to the global outbreak of the SARS-COVID-19 pandemic, authorities have enforced a number of measures including social distancing, travel restrictions that lead to the “temporary” closure of activities stemming from public services, schools, industry to local businesses. In this poster we draw the attention to the impact of such measures on urban environments and activities. For this, we use crowdsensed information available from datasets like Google Popular Times and Apple Maps to shed light on the changes undergone during the outbreak and the recovery

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Thygesen, Niels; Sapir, André; Santer, Jacques; Miedma, Douwe;
    Country: Luxembourg

    As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Werner Report, it is well worth analysing the role of Economic and Monetary Union at a time of uncertainty as to the wider European project, via an interdisciplinary approach that draws on historical and archive research and takes into consideration the theoretical debates in the literature and the various methodological challenges.What are the multifaceted future provocation facing Economic and Monetary Union? What steps still need to be taken to complete the project? How can we strengthen the international role of the euro and bolster Europe’s economic and financial autonomy? How can we best tackle technological developments in the field of money and finance? And how is the COVID-19 crisis testing the boundaries of the European integration?

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Goebbels, Robert;
    Country: Luxembourg

    The Schengen Area is one of the pillars of the European project. But it has been affected by several difficulties: the serious consequences of the global economic and financial crisis (2008-2018), growing concerns over external migratory pressure and the question of enlargement, fears of social dumping and, since March 2020, the COVID-19 crisis. Identifying these obstacles is vital so that pragmatic solutions can be found without jeopardising the founding principle.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
14 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pauly, Laure; Paccoud, Ivana; Satagopam, Venkata; Ghosh, Soumyabrata; Fritz, Joëlle; O'Sullivan, Marc; Rommes, Basile; Wilmes, Paul; Krüger, Rejko; Leist, Anja;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Background: High vaccination coverage rates are necessary to reduce infections and transmissions of the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19 and to allow successful mitigation of the current pandemic. To date, we are still lacking information to explain the hesitancy in Luxembourg towards uptake of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The present study explored motivations for and against vaccination in a population-representative sample of residents across Luxembourg to identify hesitant groups and develop strategies to increase population immunity against SARS-CoV-2. Methods: In the framework of the nationwide, representative longitudinal CON-VINCE study, a sample of 1589 respondents (49.6% women, 84.3% Luxembourg nationality) ranging from 18-84 years, participated in the survey in spring 2021. The protocol of the CON-VINCE study has been described in detail elsewhere (Snoeck et al. 2020). Results: 52% of the respondents had at least partial vaccination at time of assessment between April to June 2021. The most common reasons for vaccination of those willing to be vaccinated (81.2%) were altruistic motivations. Prevalent reasons against vaccination for those undecided (8.7%) or reluctant (10.2%) to be vaccinated were that the vaccine had not been tested sufficiently and the fear of long-term vaccine side effects. Only very few of the vaccination-hesitant or -reluctant respondents reported that they did not believe in vaccination in general. Conclusion: The present study identified motivations for and against COVID-19 vaccination and determined demographic and socio-economic factors associated with vaccination willingness. To increase vaccination rates, public health communication needs to target those unsure or unwilling to be vaccinated. We will continue to study the vaccination uptake in the Luxembourg population, as CON-VINCE is now part of the H2020-funded international ORCHESTRA project (https://orchestra-cohort.eu), research into comparing these results on a Pan-European level.

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Country: Luxembourg

    All papers are available open access on the journal's website.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, Mccarthy; Delepine, Ludovic; Deschamps, Étienne;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sölter, Jan; Proverbio, Daniele; Baniasadi, Mehri; Bossa, Matias Nicolas; Vlasov, Vanja; Garcia Santa Cruz, Beatriz; Husch, Andreas;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Our working hypothesis is that key factors in COVID-19 imaging are the available imaging data and their label noise and confounders, rather than network architectures per se. Thus, we applied existing state-of-the-art convolution neural network frameworks based on the U-Net architecture, namely nnU-Net [3], and focused on leveraging the available training data. We did not apply any pre-training nor modi ed the network architecture. First, we enriched training information by generating two additional labels for lung and body area. Lung labels were created with a public available lung segmentation network and weak body labels were generated by thresholding. Subsequently, we trained three di erent multi-class networks: 2-label (original background and lesion labels), 3-label (additional lung label) and 4-label (additional lung and body label). The 3-label obtained the best single network performance in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.756) and on the leaderboard (Dice- Score 0.755, Haussdor 95-Score 57.5). To improve robustness, we created a weighted ensemble of all three models, with calibrated weights to optimise the ranking in Dice-Score. This ensemble achieved a slight performance gain in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.760). On the validation set leaderboard, it improved our Dice-Score to 0.768 and Haussdor 95- Score to 54.8. It ranked 3rd in phase I according to mean Dice-Score. Adding unlabelled data from the public TCIA dataset in a student-teacher manner signi cantly improved our internal validation score (Dice-Score of 0.770). However, we noticed partial overlap between our additional training data (although not human-labelled) and nal test data and therefore submitted the ensemble without additional data, to yield realistic assessments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gruodytė-Račienė, R.; Čapkauskienė, S.; Pokvytytė, V.; Avgerinos, A.; Thrasyvoulos, T.; Douka, S.; Heck, Sandra; García-Roca, J.A.; von Seelen, J.;
    Country: Luxembourg

    The lifestyle of children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic has been affected dramatically by restrictions, causing a substantial decrease in physical activity (PA) and extensive increase in sedentary activity time (Xiang et al. 2020). The purpose of this study was to investigate PA and lifestyle habits of adolescent students in a sample of European countries involved in the SUGAPAS project (Supporting Gamified Physical Activities in & out of Schools), an Erasmus+ funded project aiming to design and implement mobile games which should trigger students’ health-related habitual behavior.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Germes, Mélina;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    This text is a report about the "Sex Drugs and the City" Event. // Only the half of the “Sex, Drugs and the City” event could take place. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we had to cancel the participative discussion planned for the broader public in the evening. The academic afternoon took place on October 22, 2020, in Bordeaux under the title “Alcohol and drugs in affective or sexual relationships: transactions, consent, grey zones?” A video recording of the event is available in French via the Narcotic City webpage. “Alcohol and Drugs in Affective or Sexual Relationships: Transactions, Consent, Grey Zones?”

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Welter, Danielle; Vega Moreno, Carlos Gonzalo; Biryukov, Maria; Groues, Valentin; Ghosh, Soumyabrata; Schneider, Reinhard; Satagopam, Venkata;
    Country: Luxembourg

    When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in early 2020, a lot of research efforts were quickly redirected towards studies on SARS-CoV2 and COVID-19 disease, from the sequencing and assembly of viral genomes to the elaboration of robust testing methodologies and the development of treatment and vaccination strategies. At the same time, a flurry of scientific publications around SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 began to appear, making it increasingly difficult for researchers to stay up-to-date with latest trends and developments in this rapidly evolving field. The BioKB platform is a pipeline which, by exploiting text mining and semantic technologies, helps researchers easily access semantic content of thousands of abstracts and full text articles. The content of the articles is analysed and concepts from a range of contexts, including proteins, species, chemicals, diseases and biological processes are tagged based on existing dictionaries of controlled terms. Co-occurring concepts are classified based on their asserted relationship and the resulting subject-relation-object triples are stored in a publicly accessible human- and machine-readable knowledge base. All concepts in the BioKB dictionaries are linked to stable, persistent identifiers, either a resource accession such as an Ensembl, Uniprot or PubChem ID for genes, proteins and chemicals, or an ontology term ID for diseases, phenotypes and other ontology terms. In order to improve COVID-19 related text mining, we extended the underlying dictionaries to include many additional viral species (via NCBI Taxonomy identifiers), phenotypes from the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO), COVID-related concepts including clinical and laboratory tests from the COVID-19 ontology, as well as additional diseases (DO) and biological processes (GO). We also added all viral proteins found in UniProt and gene entries from EntrezGene to increase the sensitivity of the text mining pipeline to viral data. To date, BioKB has indexed over 270’000 sentences from 21’935 publications relating to coronavirus infections, with publications dating from 1963 to 2021, 3’863 of which were published this year. We are currently working to further refine the text mining pipeline by training it on the extraction of increasingly complex relations such as protein-phenotype relationships. We are also regularly adding new terms to our dictionaries for areas where coverage is currently low, such as clinical and laboratory tests and procedures and novel drug treatments.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vitello, Piergiorgio; Capponi, Andrea; Klopp, Pol; Connors, Richard; Viti, Francesco; Fiandrino, Claudio;
    Country: Luxembourg

    As a response to the global outbreak of the SARS-COVID-19 pandemic, authorities have enforced a number of measures including social distancing, travel restrictions that lead to the “temporary” closure of activities stemming from public services, schools, industry to local businesses. In this poster we draw the attention to the impact of such measures on urban environments and activities. For this, we use crowdsensed information available from datasets like Google Popular Times and Apple Maps to shed light on the changes undergone during the outbreak and the recovery

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Thygesen, Niels; Sapir, André; Santer, Jacques; Miedma, Douwe;
    Country: Luxembourg

    As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Werner Report, it is well worth analysing the role of Economic and Monetary Union at a time of uncertainty as to the wider European project, via an interdisciplinary approach that draws on historical and archive research and takes into consideration the theoretical debates in the literature and the various methodological challenges.What are the multifaceted future provocation facing Economic and Monetary Union? What steps still need to be taken to complete the project? How can we strengthen the international role of the euro and bolster Europe’s economic and financial autonomy? How can we best tackle technological developments in the field of money and finance? And how is the COVID-19 crisis testing the boundaries of the European integration?

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Goebbels, Robert;
    Country: Luxembourg

    The Schengen Area is one of the pillars of the European project. But it has been affected by several difficulties: the serious consequences of the global economic and financial crisis (2008-2018), growing concerns over external migratory pressure and the question of enlargement, fears of social dumping and, since March 2020, the COVID-19 crisis. Identifying these obstacles is vital so that pragmatic solutions can be found without jeopardising the founding principle.