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13 Research products, page 1 of 2

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  • 2018-2022
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Garcia-Beyaert, Sofia; Suades Vall, Anna; Carbó, Marta; Fatjó, Georgina; Martínez, Claudia; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Grup de Recerca MIRAS;
    Country: Spain

    Terminología: ecografía - venir de nalgas - PCR - consultas externas - ingresar - romper aguas - parto vaginal - trabajo de parto - facilitadores para la inducción al parto - epidural - coronar - ambulatorio - sutura continua - dar el pechos - anemia Con la colaboracíón de: Marian Román Caro, Irene Ruiz Abad, Ferran Sánchez Rodríguez, Abraham Dámaso Sánchez Kate está en el tercer trimestre de su primer embarazo. Después de hacerse una analítica y otras pruebas, acude a una visita con su ginecóloga para hablar de la necesidad de hacer una cesárea. Esta visita tiene lugar durante la pandemia de la COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martinez, Miguel Angel; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona;
    Country: Spain

    Currently, the expansion of the novel human respiratory coronavirus (known as SARS-CoV-2 [severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2], COVID-2019 [coronavirus disease 2019], or 2019-nCoV [2019 novel coronavirus]) has stressed the need for therapeutic alternatives to alleviate and stop this new epidemic. The previous epidemics of infections by high-morbidity human coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV in 2003 and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012, prompted the characterization of compounds that could be potentially active against the currently emerging novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. Currently, the expansion of the novel human respiratory coronavirus (known as SARS-CoV-2 [severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2], COVID-2019 [coronavirus disease 2019], or 2019-nCoV [2019 novel coronavirus]) has stressed the need for therapeutic alternatives to alleviate and stop this new epidemic. The previous epidemics of infections by high-morbidity human coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV in 2003 and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012, prompted the characterization of compounds that could be potentially active against the currently emerging novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. The most promising compound is remdesivir (GS-5734), a nucleotide analog prodrug currently in clinical trials for treating Ebola virus infections. Remdesivir inhibited the replication of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV in tissue cultures, and it displayed efficacy in nonhuman animal models. In addition, a combination of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors lopinavir/ritonavir and interferon beta (LPV/RTV-IFN-β) was shown to be effective in patients infected with SARS-CoV. LPV/RTV-IFN-β also improved clinical parameters in marmosets and mice infected with MERS-CoV. Remarkably, the therapeutic efficacy of remdesivir appeared to be superior to that of LPV/RTV-IFN-β against MERS-CoV in a transgenic humanized mouse model. The relatively high mortality rates associated with these three novel human coronavirus infections, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2, have suggested that proinflammatory responses might play a role in the pathogenesis. It remains unknown whether the generated inflammatory state should be targeted. Therapeutics that target the coronavirus alone might not be able to reverse highly pathogenic infections. This minireview aims to provide a summary of therapeutic compounds that have shown potential in fighting SARS-CoV-2 infections

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rodriguez Contreras, Ricardo; Sanz, Pablo; Allinger, Bernadette; Van Herreweghe, Dries; Tomev, Lyuben; Bejakovic, Predrag; Kalosinatos, Pavlos; Veverková, Soña; Jorgensen, Carsten; Kadarik, Ingel; +20 more
    Country: Spain

    Aquesta publicació s'elabora a partir de les contribucions de cadascú dels membres nacionals que integren la Network of Eufound Correspondent. Pel cas d'Espanya la contribució ha estat realitzada per l'Oscar Molina Godino Since 2016, Eurofound has closely monitored the involvement of national social partners in policymaking as part of the European Semester cycle. In 2020, the focus was on their involvement during the first months of the COVID-19 outbreak. While the pandemic has presented a huge challenge to social dialogue, the results of the analysis highlight how social dialogue can be an effective tool in shaping policy initiatives and finding solutions to emergency situations affecting businesses, workers, the economy and society. It is clear that the participation of social partners in the design and implementation of national recovery and resilience plans in 2021 will be key in the recovery process and for strengthening social dialogue going forward.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ruiz-Antorán, Belén; Sancho-López, Aránzazu; Torres, Ferrán; Moreno-Torres, Víctor; de Pablo-López, Itziar; García-López, Paulina; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Rosso-Fernández, Clara M.; Aldea-Perona, Ana; Montané, Eva; +14 more
    Country: Spain

    We aimed to determine the impact of tocilizumab use on severe COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 19) pneumonia mortality. We performed a multicentre retrospective cohort study in 18 tertiary hospitals in Spain from March to April 2020. Consecutive patients admitted with severe COVID-19 treated with tocilizumab were compared to patients not treated with tocilizumab, adjusting by inverse probability of the treatment weights (IPTW). Tocilizumab's effect in patients receiving steroids during the 48 h following inclusion was analysed. During the study period, 506 patients with severe COVID-19 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Among them, 268 were treated with tocilizumab and 238 patients were not. Median time to tocilizumab treatment from onset of symptoms was 11 days [interquartile range (IQR) 8-14]. Global mortality was 23.7%. Mortality was lower in patients treated with tocilizumab than in controls: 16.8% versus 31.5%, hazard ratio (HR) 0.514 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.355-0.744], p < 0.001; weighted HR 0.741 (95% CI 0.619-0.887), p = 0.001. Tocilizumab treatment reduced mortality by 14.7% relative to no tocilizumab treatment [relative risk reduction (RRR) 46.7%]. We calculated a number necessary to treat of 7. Among patients treated with steroids, mortality was lower in those treated with tocilizumab than in those treated with steroids alone [10.9% versus 40.2%, HR 0.511 (95% CI 0.352-0.741), p = 0.036; weighted HR 0.6 (95% CI 0.449-0.804), p < 0.001] (interaction p = 0.094). These results show that survival of patients with severe COVID-19 is higher in those treated with tocilizumab than in those not treated and that tocilizumab's effect adds to that of steroids administered to non-intubated patients with COVID-19 during the first 48 h of presenting with respiratory failure despite oxygen therapy. Randomised controlled studies are needed to confirm these results. European Union electronic Register of Post-Authorization Studies (EU PAS Register) identifier, EUPAS34415 The online version of this article (10.1007/s40121-020-00373-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Palaiodimou, Lina; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Caso, Valeria; Köhrmann, Martin; Molina, Carlos; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Fischer, Urs; Kelly, Peter; Sharma, Vijay K.; +9 more
    Country: Spain

    The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan, China and rapidly spread worldwide, with a vast majority of confirmed cases presenting with respiratory symptoms. Potential neurological manifestations and their pathophysiological mechanisms have not been thoroughly established. In this narrative review, we sought to present the neurological manifestations associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Case reports, case series, editorials, reviews, case-control and cohort studies were evaluated, and relevant information was abstracted. Various reports of neurological manifestations of previous coronavirus epidemics provide a roadmap regarding potential neurological complications of COVID-19, due to many shared characteristics between these viruses and SARS-CoV-2. Studies from the current pandemic are accumulating and report COVID-19 patients presenting with dizziness, headache, myalgias, hypogeusia and hyposmia, but also with more serious manifestations including polyneuropathy, myositis, cerebrovascular diseases, encephalitis and encephalopathy. However, discrimination between causal relationship and incidental comorbidity is often difficult. Severe COVID-19 shares common risk factors with cerebrovascular diseases, and it is currently unclear whether the infection per se represents an independent stroke risk factor. Regardless of any direct or indirect neurological manifestations, the COVID-19 pandemic has a huge impact on the management of neurological patients, whether infected or not. In particular, the majority of stroke services worldwide have been negatively influenced in terms of care delivery and fear to access healthcare services. The effect on healthcare quality in the field of other neurological diseases is additionally evaluated.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Irigoyen, Martina Benedetti; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Facultat de Ciències Polítiques i de Sociologia;
    Country: Spain

    Amid the chaos that COVID 19 was causing, several actors created a partnership to try to lessen the impact of the pandemic. The COVAX Facility was meant to be a mechanism for global equitable access to vaccines. With ambitious goals and promises, it relied a lot on the solidarity and cooperation between countries. This policy paper intends to understand the need for the international community in providing Global Public Health, to analyze the weaknesses and strengths of COVAX, and also, to offer recommendation on how to improve it. This was done through the analysis of about 53 materials, including policy and academic papers, reports, databases and journalistic sources. After revaluating the creation and development of COVAX, some flaws were found in its structure and implementation. Some of the main issues were allocation frameworks, transparency, solidarity framing, funding, accessibility, nationalism, and a restricted manufacturing base. These and other issues were addressed in the last chapter with the final recommendations. Despite it being aimed at COVAX's coordinators, it can also be used by other organizations and partnerships that want to have a base for other Global Public Health initiative

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martinez, Miguel Angel; Franco Cirera, Sandra; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona;
    Country: Spain

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), which has infected millions of people worldwide in only a few months. A minority, but significant number, of infected individuals require hospitalization and intensive care. From the start of this new virus pandemic, it was apparent that obese and/or diabetic individuals had a bad prognosis for COVID-19 progression, strongly suggesting an association between liver disease and severe COVID-19. Because chronic liver disease (CLD) is associated with immune dysregulation and inflammation, it is unsurprising that patients with CLD may carry a greater risk of adverse outcomes following SARS-CoV-2 infection. Initial COVID-19 data have also indicated that healthy infected individuals display abnormal liver function tests, suggesting a possible direct implication of SARS-CoV-2 in liver damage. Here we show that COVID-19 affects the liver metabolism and increases the morbidity and mortality of individuals with underlying CLD.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dubois, Hans; Allinger, Bernadette; Van Herreweghe, Dries; Neykov, Ivan; Miteva, Nadejda; Kalosinatos, Pavlos; Kroupa, Ales; Aranea, Mona; Larsen, Katrine Marie; Kadarik, Ingel; +35 more
    Publisher: Luxemburg Publications Office of the European Union
    Country: Spain

    Per part del QUIT com a corresponsal d'Eurofound, la contribució a l'informe ha estat feta per l'Alejandro Godino. This report captures the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the quality of life of older citizens, including the impact on their well-being, finances, employment and social inclusion. It explores the effects on the use of care services and older people's reliance on other support. The report presents policy measures that have been implemented in EU Member States to support older people along all of the above-mentioned dimensions. These include measures to support independent living and schemes to support the labour market integration of older people or to prevent unemployment, all of which play a role in the quality of life of older citizens.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corominas, Hèctor; Castellvi, Ivan; Díaz Torne, César; Matas, Laia; de la Rosa Carrillo, David; Mangues, Ma Antonia; Moya, Patricia; Pomar, Virginia; Benito, Natividad; Moga, Esther; +4 more
    Country: Spain

    Blocking IL-6 pathways with sarilumab, a fully human anti-IL-6R antagonist may potentially curb the inflammatory storm of SARS-CoV2. In the present emergency scenario, we used "off-label" sarilumab in 5 elderly patients in life-threatening condition not candidates to further active measures. We suggest that sarilumab can modulate severe COVID-19-associated Cytokine Release Syndrome.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Galán, María; Jiménez-Altayó, F.; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Farmacologia, de Terapèutica i de Toxicologia;
    Country: Spain

    This work was supported by grants from the Spanish Ministerio de Econom?a y Competitividad (MINECO)-Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) (PI17/01837 to MG and SAF2014-56111-R to FJ-A); Generalitat de Catalunya (SGR-645 to FJ-A); and by CIBER on Cardiovascular Diseases (CIBERCV) (CB16/11/00257 to MG), an initiative from Carlos III National Institute of Health, Spain with co-funding from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). MG was supported by funds provided by ISCIII (CP15/00126, Miguel Servet I program). This work was supported by grants from the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (MINECO)-Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) (PI17/01837 to MG and SAF2014-56111-R to FJ-A); Generalitat de Catalunya (SGR-645 to FJ-A); and by CIBER on Cardiovascular Diseases (CIBERCV) (CB16/11/00257 to MG), an initiative from Carlos III National Institute of Health, Spain with co-funding from Cardiovascular disease causes almost one third of deaths worldwide, and more than half are related to primary arterial hypertension (PAH). The occurrence of several deleterious events, such as hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and oxidative and inflammatory stress, contributes to the development of small vessel disease in PAH. Small resistance arteries are found at various points through the arterial tree, act as the major site of vascular resistance, and actively regulate local tissue perfusion. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrate that alterations in small resistance artery properties are important features of PAH pathophysiology. Diseased small vessels in PAH show decreased lumens, thicker walls, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress and inflammation. These events may lead to altered blood flow supply to tissues and organs, and can increase the risk of thrombosis. Notably, PAH is prevalent among patients diagnosed with COVID-19, in whom evidence of small vessel disease leading to cardiovascular pathology is reported. The SARS-Cov2 virus, responsible for COVID-19, achieves cell entry through an S (spike) high-affinity protein binding to the catalytic domain of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a negative regulator of the RAS pathway. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the relationship between small resistance artery disease, ACE2, and PAH, to understand COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. The scope of the present review is to briefly summarize available knowledge on the role of small resistance artery disease and ACE2 in PAH, and critically discuss their clinical relevance in the context of cardiovascular pathology associated to COVID-19.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
13 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Garcia-Beyaert, Sofia; Suades Vall, Anna; Carbó, Marta; Fatjó, Georgina; Martínez, Claudia; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Grup de Recerca MIRAS;
    Country: Spain

    Terminología: ecografía - venir de nalgas - PCR - consultas externas - ingresar - romper aguas - parto vaginal - trabajo de parto - facilitadores para la inducción al parto - epidural - coronar - ambulatorio - sutura continua - dar el pechos - anemia Con la colaboracíón de: Marian Román Caro, Irene Ruiz Abad, Ferran Sánchez Rodríguez, Abraham Dámaso Sánchez Kate está en el tercer trimestre de su primer embarazo. Después de hacerse una analítica y otras pruebas, acude a una visita con su ginecóloga para hablar de la necesidad de hacer una cesárea. Esta visita tiene lugar durante la pandemia de la COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martinez, Miguel Angel; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona;
    Country: Spain

    Currently, the expansion of the novel human respiratory coronavirus (known as SARS-CoV-2 [severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2], COVID-2019 [coronavirus disease 2019], or 2019-nCoV [2019 novel coronavirus]) has stressed the need for therapeutic alternatives to alleviate and stop this new epidemic. The previous epidemics of infections by high-morbidity human coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV in 2003 and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012, prompted the characterization of compounds that could be potentially active against the currently emerging novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. Currently, the expansion of the novel human respiratory coronavirus (known as SARS-CoV-2 [severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2], COVID-2019 [coronavirus disease 2019], or 2019-nCoV [2019 novel coronavirus]) has stressed the need for therapeutic alternatives to alleviate and stop this new epidemic. The previous epidemics of infections by high-morbidity human coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV in 2003 and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012, prompted the characterization of compounds that could be potentially active against the currently emerging novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. The most promising compound is remdesivir (GS-5734), a nucleotide analog prodrug currently in clinical trials for treating Ebola virus infections. Remdesivir inhibited the replication of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV in tissue cultures, and it displayed efficacy in nonhuman animal models. In addition, a combination of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors lopinavir/ritonavir and interferon beta (LPV/RTV-IFN-β) was shown to be effective in patients infected with SARS-CoV. LPV/RTV-IFN-β also improved clinical parameters in marmosets and mice infected with MERS-CoV. Remarkably, the therapeutic efficacy of remdesivir appeared to be superior to that of LPV/RTV-IFN-β against MERS-CoV in a transgenic humanized mouse model. The relatively high mortality rates associated with these three novel human coronavirus infections, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2, have suggested that proinflammatory responses might play a role in the pathogenesis. It remains unknown whether the generated inflammatory state should be targeted. Therapeutics that target the coronavirus alone might not be able to reverse highly pathogenic infections. This minireview aims to provide a summary of therapeutic compounds that have shown potential in fighting SARS-CoV-2 infections

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rodriguez Contreras, Ricardo; Sanz, Pablo; Allinger, Bernadette; Van Herreweghe, Dries; Tomev, Lyuben; Bejakovic, Predrag; Kalosinatos, Pavlos; Veverková, Soña; Jorgensen, Carsten; Kadarik, Ingel; +20 more
    Country: Spain

    Aquesta publicació s'elabora a partir de les contribucions de cadascú dels membres nacionals que integren la Network of Eufound Correspondent. Pel cas d'Espanya la contribució ha estat realitzada per l'Oscar Molina Godino Since 2016, Eurofound has closely monitored the involvement of national social partners in policymaking as part of the European Semester cycle. In 2020, the focus was on their involvement during the first months of the COVID-19 outbreak. While the pandemic has presented a huge challenge to social dialogue, the results of the analysis highlight how social dialogue can be an effective tool in shaping policy initiatives and finding solutions to emergency situations affecting businesses, workers, the economy and society. It is clear that the participation of social partners in the design and implementation of national recovery and resilience plans in 2021 will be key in the recovery process and for strengthening social dialogue going forward.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ruiz-Antorán, Belén; Sancho-López, Aránzazu; Torres, Ferrán; Moreno-Torres, Víctor; de Pablo-López, Itziar; García-López, Paulina; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Rosso-Fernández, Clara M.; Aldea-Perona, Ana; Montané, Eva; +14 more
    Country: Spain

    We aimed to determine the impact of tocilizumab use on severe COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 19) pneumonia mortality. We performed a multicentre retrospective cohort study in 18 tertiary hospitals in Spain from March to April 2020. Consecutive patients admitted with severe COVID-19 treated with tocilizumab were compared to patients not treated with tocilizumab, adjusting by inverse probability of the treatment weights (IPTW). Tocilizumab's effect in patients receiving steroids during the 48 h following inclusion was analysed. During the study period, 506 patients with severe COVID-19 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Among them, 268 were treated with tocilizumab and 238 patients were not. Median time to tocilizumab treatment from onset of symptoms was 11 days [interquartile range (IQR) 8-14]. Global mortality was 23.7%. Mortality was lower in patients treated with tocilizumab than in controls: 16.8% versus 31.5%, hazard ratio (HR) 0.514 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.355-0.744], p < 0.001; weighted HR 0.741 (95% CI 0.619-0.887), p = 0.001. Tocilizumab treatment reduced mortality by 14.7% relative to no tocilizumab treatment [relative risk reduction (RRR) 46.7%]. We calculated a number necessary to treat of 7. Among patients treated with steroids, mortality was lower in those treated with tocilizumab than in those treated with steroids alone [10.9% versus 40.2%, HR 0.511 (95% CI 0.352-0.741), p = 0.036; weighted HR 0.6 (95% CI 0.449-0.804), p < 0.001] (interaction p = 0.094). These results show that survival of patients with severe COVID-19 is higher in those treated with tocilizumab than in those not treated and that tocilizumab's effect adds to that of steroids administered to non-intubated patients with COVID-19 during the first 48 h of presenting with respiratory failure despite oxygen therapy. Randomised controlled studies are needed to confirm these results. European Union electronic Register of Post-Authorization Studies (EU PAS Register) identifier, EUPAS34415 The online version of this article (10.1007/s40121-020-00373-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Palaiodimou, Lina; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Caso, Valeria; Köhrmann, Martin; Molina, Carlos; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Fischer, Urs; Kelly, Peter; Sharma, Vijay K.; +9 more
    Country: Spain

    The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan, China and rapidly spread worldwide, with a vast majority of confirmed cases presenting with respiratory symptoms. Potential neurological manifestations and their pathophysiological mechanisms have not been thoroughly established. In this narrative review, we sought to present the neurological manifestations associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Case reports, case series, editorials, reviews, case-control and cohort studies were evaluated, and relevant information was abstracted. Various reports of neurological manifestations of previous coronavirus epidemics provide a roadmap regarding potential neurological complications of COVID-19, due to many shared characteristics between these viruses and SARS-CoV-2. Studies from the current pandemic are accumulating and report COVID-19 patients presenting with dizziness, headache, myalgias, hypogeusia and hyposmia, but also with more serious manifestations including polyneuropathy, myositis, cerebrovascular diseases, encephalitis and encephalopathy. However, discrimination between causal relationship and incidental comorbidity is often difficult. Severe COVID-19 shares common risk factors with cerebrovascular diseases, and it is currently unclear whether the infection per se represents an independent stroke risk factor. Regardless of any direct or indirect neurological manifestations, the COVID-19 pandemic has a huge impact on the management of neurological patients, whether infected or not. In particular, the majority of stroke services worldwide have been negatively influenced in terms of care delivery and fear to access healthcare services. The effect on healthcare quality in the field of other neurological diseases is additionally evaluated.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Irigoyen, Martina Benedetti; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Facultat de Ciències Polítiques i de Sociologia;
    Country: Spain

    Amid the chaos that COVID 19 was causing, several actors created a partnership to try to lessen the impact of the pandemic. The COVAX Facility was meant to be a mechanism for global equitable access to vaccines. With ambitious goals and promises, it relied a lot on the solidarity and cooperation between countries. This policy paper intends to understand the need for the international community in providing Global Public Health, to analyze the weaknesses and strengths of COVAX, and also, to offer recommendation on how to improve it. This was done through the analysis of about 53 materials, including policy and academic papers, reports, databases and journalistic sources. After revaluating the creation and development of COVAX, some flaws were found in its structure and implementation. Some of the main issues were allocation frameworks, transparency, solidarity framing, funding, accessibility, nationalism, and a restricted manufacturing base. These and other issues were addressed in the last chapter with the final recommendations. Despite it being aimed at COVAX's coordinators, it can also be used by other organizations and partnerships that want to have a base for other Global Public Health initiative

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martinez, Miguel Angel; Franco Cirera, Sandra; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona;
    Country: Spain

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), which has infected millions of people worldwide in only a few months. A minority, but significant number, of infected individuals require hospitalization and intensive care. From the start of this new virus pandemic, it was apparent that obese and/or diabetic individuals had a bad prognosis for COVID-19 progression, strongly suggesting an association between liver disease and severe COVID-19. Because chronic liver disease (CLD) is associated with immune dysregulation and inflammation, it is unsurprising that patients with CLD may carry a greater risk of adverse outcomes following SARS-CoV-2 infection. Initial COVID-19 data have also indicated that healthy infected individuals display abnormal liver function tests, suggesting a possible direct implication of SARS-CoV-2 in liver damage. Here we show that COVID-19 affects the liver metabolism and increases the morbidity and mortality of individuals with underlying CLD.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dubois, Hans; Allinger, Bernadette; Van Herreweghe, Dries; Neykov, Ivan; Miteva, Nadejda; Kalosinatos, Pavlos; Kroupa, Ales; Aranea, Mona; Larsen, Katrine Marie; Kadarik, Ingel; +35 more
    Publisher: Luxemburg Publications Office of the European Union
    Country: Spain

    Per part del QUIT com a corresponsal d'Eurofound, la contribució a l'informe ha estat feta per l'Alejandro Godino. This report captures the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the quality of life of older citizens, including the impact on their well-being, finances, employment and social inclusion. It explores the effects on the use of care services and older people's reliance on other support. The report presents policy measures that have been implemented in EU Member States to support older people along all of the above-mentioned dimensions. These include measures to support independent living and schemes to support the labour market integration of older people or to prevent unemployment, all of which play a role in the quality of life of older citizens.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corominas, Hèctor; Castellvi, Ivan; Díaz Torne, César; Matas, Laia; de la Rosa Carrillo, David; Mangues, Ma Antonia; Moya, Patricia; Pomar, Virginia; Benito, Natividad; Moga, Esther; +4 more
    Country: Spain

    Blocking IL-6 pathways with sarilumab, a fully human anti-IL-6R antagonist may potentially curb the inflammatory storm of SARS-CoV2. In the present emergency scenario, we used "off-label" sarilumab in 5 elderly patients in life-threatening condition not candidates to further active measures. We suggest that sarilumab can modulate severe COVID-19-associated Cytokine Release Syndrome.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Galán, María; Jiménez-Altayó, F.; Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Farmacologia, de Terapèutica i de Toxicologia;
    Country: Spain

    This work was supported by grants from the Spanish Ministerio de Econom?a y Competitividad (MINECO)-Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) (PI17/01837 to MG and SAF2014-56111-R to FJ-A); Generalitat de Catalunya (SGR-645 to FJ-A); and by CIBER on Cardiovascular Diseases (CIBERCV) (CB16/11/00257 to MG), an initiative from Carlos III National Institute of Health, Spain with co-funding from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). MG was supported by funds provided by ISCIII (CP15/00126, Miguel Servet I program). This work was supported by grants from the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (MINECO)-Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) (PI17/01837 to MG and SAF2014-56111-R to FJ-A); Generalitat de Catalunya (SGR-645 to FJ-A); and by CIBER on Cardiovascular Diseases (CIBERCV) (CB16/11/00257 to MG), an initiative from Carlos III National Institute of Health, Spain with co-funding from Cardiovascular disease causes almost one third of deaths worldwide, and more than half are related to primary arterial hypertension (PAH). The occurrence of several deleterious events, such as hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and oxidative and inflammatory stress, contributes to the development of small vessel disease in PAH. Small resistance arteries are found at various points through the arterial tree, act as the major site of vascular resistance, and actively regulate local tissue perfusion. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrate that alterations in small resistance artery properties are important features of PAH pathophysiology. Diseased small vessels in PAH show decreased lumens, thicker walls, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress and inflammation. These events may lead to altered blood flow supply to tissues and organs, and can increase the risk of thrombosis. Notably, PAH is prevalent among patients diagnosed with COVID-19, in whom evidence of small vessel disease leading to cardiovascular pathology is reported. The SARS-Cov2 virus, responsible for COVID-19, achieves cell entry through an S (spike) high-affinity protein binding to the catalytic domain of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a negative regulator of the RAS pathway. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the relationship between small resistance artery disease, ACE2, and PAH, to understand COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. The scope of the present review is to briefly summarize available knowledge on the role of small resistance artery disease and ACE2 in PAH, and critically discuss their clinical relevance in the context of cardiovascular pathology associated to COVID-19.