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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
16 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
  • Open Access
  • Annotation
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Trigás Pereira, Inés;
    Country: Spain

    [Abstract] It is widely accepted that language changes; this change goes simultaneously with the evolution of the world. Phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics or pragmatics have evolved and then been examined by linguistics. Word-formation processes have been a widely studied issue because of its complexity and interest; recently, the new tendencies in word-formation patterns have been a recurrent subject of study but have not been explored in great depth. This paper aims to analyse the 712 words included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) during 2020 in order to obtain a pattern of the most dominant processes of formation of new words and the essential semantic fields. To this end, some previous knowledge of word-formation was essential, in addition to the need to refer to those few studies on the latest trends. Access to the OED was then required, and, by using the list with the words provided by the OED, an analysis of word-formation processes and semantic fields was carried out. But first, a selection of different sources was needed for the overview of the diverse word-formation processes. My findings show that word formation processes have changed but perhaps not as much as expected: traditionally, compounding and affixation were the most important processes, and this continues to be this way. Nevertheless, new processes are becoming more important –clipping, blending or conversion–; at the same time, some others appear to be quite unproductive –initialisms, acronyms, reduplication or back-formation–. Besides, borrowing has been fundamental in the production of new words and its importance will be mentioned in this study, although it is not really a word-formation process. As a result, language changes but very slowly, and the so-called minor word-formation processes are these days more important than, for instance, during the Old English period. Apparently, both word-formation processes and semantic fields continue to be quite traditional and not much modification has taken place. Ease is going to influence the selection of the processes of formation of new words; for instance, compounding is much easier and then more productive than blending. Moreover, many words come from specialized fields –linguistics, gastronomy, fashion, health–, whereas semantic fields –such as Internet and technologies–, which were expected to be more dominant, are not so essential. Further research could be carried out with the focus on words related to a particular semantic field, for instance, health. Studying words specifically related to the pandemic would also be valuable since Covid-19 has not finished yet. Other lines of study could also possibly delve into the patterns of formation of clippings or blendings or into the analysis of the many borrowings that were included during the referred year. Traballo fin de grao (UDC.FIL). Inglés: estudios lingüísticos y literarios. Curso 2020/2021

  • Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Córdoba, Universidad de;
    Publisher: Universidad de Córdoba, 2021
    Country: Colombia
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Palloni, Alberto;
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
    Country: Spain

    This essay examines the potential impact of Covid-19 on maternal and child health, the elderly, and the “sandwich generation” of young adults. Landis MacKellar and Rachel Friedman (ed.). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ávila-Villanueva, Marina; Gómez-Ramírez, Jaime; Ávila, Jesús; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel A.;
    Publisher: Bentham Science Publishers
    Country: Spain

    There is considerable empirical evidence that unequivocally points to loneliness as a modifiable risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease and other related dementias. With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting lockdown and social distancing, there has been a renewed interest in studying this topic. The present review examines the links between loneliness and Alzheimer's disease, with particular emphasis on the mechanisms common to both conditions. Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Annotation . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Seyitoğlu, Faruk; Ivanov, Stanislav;
    Publisher: Current Issues in Tourism
    Country: Turkey

    COVID-19 pandemic is affecting negatively the tourism and hospitality industry. As people must avoid physical interaction, service robots can be a useful tool to ensure a high level of physical social distance during the epidemic. This paper discusses whether the application of service robots to provide physical distance in the tourism and hospitality context is going to be beneficial or there will be side effects as well. The paper posits that service robots create a technological shield between tourists and employees that increases the physical and emotional distance between them.

  • Other research product . Annotation . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Haddini, Jemaa; Hernández Cardós, Marina;
    Publisher: IPS.Instituto de Política social/SocialMurcia
  • Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Córdoba, Universidad de;
    Publisher: Universidad de Córdoba, 2020
    Country: Colombia
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vinh, Donald C.; Abel, Laurent; Bastard, Paul; Cheng, Matthew P.; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Gregersen, Peter K.; Haerynck, Filomeen; Cicalese, Maria P.; Hagin, David; Soler-Palacín, Pere; +8 more
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Spain

    Since December 2019, over 150 million individuals have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 globally. While most cases (>95%) are asymptomatic or mild, a small proportion develop moderate, severe, or critical COVID-19 pneumonia requiring hospitalization, at times in the intensive care unit [1]. At least 2 million patients have already died [2]. The main epidemiological risk factor associated with critical pneumonia or death is age > 65 years; however, life-threatening COVID-19 has also affected younger people, albeit sporadically. Studies have suggested that type I interferon (IFN) immunity contributes to the control of SARS-CoV-2 infection [3,4,5,6,7,8]. Notably, inborn errors of TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN production or amplification underlie severe disease in ~3% of a cohort of relatively young adult patients analyzed by the COVID Human Genetic Effort (COVIDhge.com) [3]. In at least an additional 10% of cases, high levels of pre-existing auto-antibodies (auto-Abs) neutralizing most type I IFNs, but rarely IFN-β, abrogate type I IFN–dependent control of SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro, thereby underlying critical disease in vivo [3, 4, 9, 10]. This observation was replicated in other cohorts [11,12,13,14,15]. The mean age of patients with inborn errors was 48 years, while that of patients with auto-Abs was 65 years. These findings support a two-step model of COVID-19 pathogenesis: defective type I IFN immunity in the first hours and days of infection leads to uncontrolled viral replication with spread to the lungs and other tissues, with subsequent excessive leukocyte recruitment, underlying uncontrolled inflammation [5]. This model of early deficient type I IFN function provides a framework for novel preventive and therapeutic approaches of COVID-19. Here, we explore two therapeutic routes that aim to restore protective type I IFN immunity: [1] the early administration of IFN-β in ambulatory subjects, including exposed individuals prior to infection, pre-symptomatic infected individuals and symptomatic individuals, and [2] the removal of auto-Abs to type I IFN in hospitalized patients. We also discuss the implications of these findings for other preventive and therapeutic interventions, including B cell depletion, JAK inhibitors, intravenous immunoglobulins, the use of convalescent plasma and virus-specific mAbs, and vaccination. This discussion is timely, as more than one year into the pandemic, we are still in the dark about the best prevention and treatment for severe COVID-19 pneumonia, while the emergence of more contagious viral variants, causing more severe disease, raises concerns regarding the efficacy of the nascent vaccination programs [16, 17]. D.C.V. is supported by the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec clinician-scientist scholar Junior 2 program. L.D.N. and H.C.S. are supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. The Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases is supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Rockefeller University, the St. Giles Foundation, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (R01AI088364), the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program (UL1 TR001866), a Fast Grant from Emergent Ventures, Mercatus Center at George Mason University, the Yale Center for Mendelian Genomics and the GSP Coordinating Center funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) (UM1HG006504 and U24HG008956), the Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation, the Meyer Foundation, the French National Research Agency (ANR) under the “Investments for the Future” program (ANR-10-IAHU-01), the Integrative Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory of Excellence (ANR-10-LABX-62-IBEID), the French Foundation for Medical Research (FRM) (EQU201903007798), the FRM and ANR GENCOVID project, ANRS-COV05, the Square Foundation, Grandir - Fonds de solidarité pour l’enfance, the SCOR Corporate Foundation for Science, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), and the University of Paris. PB is supported by the MD-PhD program of the Imagine Institute (with the support of the Fondation Bettencourt-Schueller). I.M. is a Senior Clinical Investigator at the Research Foundation – Flanders, and is chair of the CSL Behring Chair of Primary Immunodeficiencies at KU Leuven, by the KU Leuven C1 Grant C16/18/007, by a VIB GC PID Grant, by the FWO Grants G0C8517N, G0B5120N, and G0E8420N, and by the Jeffrey Modell Foundation. This work is supported by ERN-RITA. Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia;
    Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
    Country: Spain

    This article is made available via the PMC Open Access Subset for unrestricted noncommercial re-use and secondary analysis in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for the duration of the World Health Organization (WHO) declaration of COVID-19 as a global pandemic. The composition and dynamics of viral mutant spectra in infected individuals advice that to avoid selection of SARS-CoV-2 escape mutants, vaccination campaigns for COVID-19 should be launched when disease incidence is low. Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Annotation . 2020
    Open Access Turkish
    Country: Turkey

    Konu başlıkları: -Covid-19 Sürecinde Erişime Açılan Yeni Veri Tabanları eBook Academic Collection, MLA International Bibliography with Full Text, Political Science Complete, Scientific & Medical ART Imagebase.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
16 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Trigás Pereira, Inés;
    Country: Spain

    [Abstract] It is widely accepted that language changes; this change goes simultaneously with the evolution of the world. Phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics or pragmatics have evolved and then been examined by linguistics. Word-formation processes have been a widely studied issue because of its complexity and interest; recently, the new tendencies in word-formation patterns have been a recurrent subject of study but have not been explored in great depth. This paper aims to analyse the 712 words included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) during 2020 in order to obtain a pattern of the most dominant processes of formation of new words and the essential semantic fields. To this end, some previous knowledge of word-formation was essential, in addition to the need to refer to those few studies on the latest trends. Access to the OED was then required, and, by using the list with the words provided by the OED, an analysis of word-formation processes and semantic fields was carried out. But first, a selection of different sources was needed for the overview of the diverse word-formation processes. My findings show that word formation processes have changed but perhaps not as much as expected: traditionally, compounding and affixation were the most important processes, and this continues to be this way. Nevertheless, new processes are becoming more important –clipping, blending or conversion–; at the same time, some others appear to be quite unproductive –initialisms, acronyms, reduplication or back-formation–. Besides, borrowing has been fundamental in the production of new words and its importance will be mentioned in this study, although it is not really a word-formation process. As a result, language changes but very slowly, and the so-called minor word-formation processes are these days more important than, for instance, during the Old English period. Apparently, both word-formation processes and semantic fields continue to be quite traditional and not much modification has taken place. Ease is going to influence the selection of the processes of formation of new words; for instance, compounding is much easier and then more productive than blending. Moreover, many words come from specialized fields –linguistics, gastronomy, fashion, health–, whereas semantic fields –such as Internet and technologies–, which were expected to be more dominant, are not so essential. Further research could be carried out with the focus on words related to a particular semantic field, for instance, health. Studying words specifically related to the pandemic would also be valuable since Covid-19 has not finished yet. Other lines of study could also possibly delve into the patterns of formation of clippings or blendings or into the analysis of the many borrowings that were included during the referred year. Traballo fin de grao (UDC.FIL). Inglés: estudios lingüísticos y literarios. Curso 2020/2021

  • Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Córdoba, Universidad de;
    Publisher: Universidad de Córdoba, 2021
    Country: Colombia
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Palloni, Alberto;
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
    Country: Spain

    This essay examines the potential impact of Covid-19 on maternal and child health, the elderly, and the “sandwich generation” of young adults. Landis MacKellar and Rachel Friedman (ed.). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ávila-Villanueva, Marina; Gómez-Ramírez, Jaime; Ávila, Jesús; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel A.;
    Publisher: Bentham Science Publishers
    Country: Spain

    There is considerable empirical evidence that unequivocally points to loneliness as a modifiable risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease and other related dementias. With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting lockdown and social distancing, there has been a renewed interest in studying this topic. The present review examines the links between loneliness and Alzheimer's disease, with particular emphasis on the mechanisms common to both conditions. Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Annotation . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Seyitoğlu, Faruk; Ivanov, Stanislav;
    Publisher: Current Issues in Tourism
    Country: Turkey

    COVID-19 pandemic is affecting negatively the tourism and hospitality industry. As people must avoid physical interaction, service robots can be a useful tool to ensure a high level of physical social distance during the epidemic. This paper discusses whether the application of service robots to provide physical distance in the tourism and hospitality context is going to be beneficial or there will be side effects as well. The paper posits that service robots create a technological shield between tourists and employees that increases the physical and emotional distance between them.

  • Other research product . Annotation . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Haddini, Jemaa; Hernández Cardós, Marina;
    Publisher: IPS.Instituto de Política social/SocialMurcia
  • Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Córdoba, Universidad de;
    Publisher: Universidad de Córdoba, 2020
    Country: Colombia
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vinh, Donald C.; Abel, Laurent; Bastard, Paul; Cheng, Matthew P.; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Gregersen, Peter K.; Haerynck, Filomeen; Cicalese, Maria P.; Hagin, David; Soler-Palacín, Pere; +8 more
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Spain

    Since December 2019, over 150 million individuals have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 globally. While most cases (>95%) are asymptomatic or mild, a small proportion develop moderate, severe, or critical COVID-19 pneumonia requiring hospitalization, at times in the intensive care unit [1]. At least 2 million patients have already died [2]. The main epidemiological risk factor associated with critical pneumonia or death is age > 65 years; however, life-threatening COVID-19 has also affected younger people, albeit sporadically. Studies have suggested that type I interferon (IFN) immunity contributes to the control of SARS-CoV-2 infection [3,4,5,6,7,8]. Notably, inborn errors of TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN production or amplification underlie severe disease in ~3% of a cohort of relatively young adult patients analyzed by the COVID Human Genetic Effort (COVIDhge.com) [3]. In at least an additional 10% of cases, high levels of pre-existing auto-antibodies (auto-Abs) neutralizing most type I IFNs, but rarely IFN-β, abrogate type I IFN–dependent control of SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro, thereby underlying critical disease in vivo [3, 4, 9, 10]. This observation was replicated in other cohorts [11,12,13,14,15]. The mean age of patients with inborn errors was 48 years, while that of patients with auto-Abs was 65 years. These findings support a two-step model of COVID-19 pathogenesis: defective type I IFN immunity in the first hours and days of infection leads to uncontrolled viral replication with spread to the lungs and other tissues, with subsequent excessive leukocyte recruitment, underlying uncontrolled inflammation [5]. This model of early deficient type I IFN function provides a framework for novel preventive and therapeutic approaches of COVID-19. Here, we explore two therapeutic routes that aim to restore protective type I IFN immunity: [1] the early administration of IFN-β in ambulatory subjects, including exposed individuals prior to infection, pre-symptomatic infected individuals and symptomatic individuals, and [2] the removal of auto-Abs to type I IFN in hospitalized patients. We also discuss the implications of these findings for other preventive and therapeutic interventions, including B cell depletion, JAK inhibitors, intravenous immunoglobulins, the use of convalescent plasma and virus-specific mAbs, and vaccination. This discussion is timely, as more than one year into the pandemic, we are still in the dark about the best prevention and treatment for severe COVID-19 pneumonia, while the emergence of more contagious viral variants, causing more severe disease, raises concerns regarding the efficacy of the nascent vaccination programs [16, 17]. D.C.V. is supported by the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec clinician-scientist scholar Junior 2 program. L.D.N. and H.C.S. are supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. The Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases is supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Rockefeller University, the St. Giles Foundation, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (R01AI088364), the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program (UL1 TR001866), a Fast Grant from Emergent Ventures, Mercatus Center at George Mason University, the Yale Center for Mendelian Genomics and the GSP Coordinating Center funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) (UM1HG006504 and U24HG008956), the Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation, the Meyer Foundation, the French National Research Agency (ANR) under the “Investments for the Future” program (ANR-10-IAHU-01), the Integrative Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory of Excellence (ANR-10-LABX-62-IBEID), the French Foundation for Medical Research (FRM) (EQU201903007798), the FRM and ANR GENCOVID project, ANRS-COV05, the Square Foundation, Grandir - Fonds de solidarité pour l’enfance, the SCOR Corporate Foundation for Science, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), and the University of Paris. PB is supported by the MD-PhD program of the Imagine Institute (with the support of the Fondation Bettencourt-Schueller). I.M. is a Senior Clinical Investigator at the Research Foundation – Flanders, and is chair of the CSL Behring Chair of Primary Immunodeficiencies at KU Leuven, by the KU Leuven C1 Grant C16/18/007, by a VIB GC PID Grant, by the FWO Grants G0C8517N, G0B5120N, and G0E8420N, and by the Jeffrey Modell Foundation. This work is supported by ERN-RITA. Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia;
    Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
    Country: Spain

    This article is made available via the PMC Open Access Subset for unrestricted noncommercial re-use and secondary analysis in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for the duration of the World Health Organization (WHO) declaration of COVID-19 as a global pandemic. The composition and dynamics of viral mutant spectra in infected individuals advice that to avoid selection of SARS-CoV-2 escape mutants, vaccination campaigns for COVID-19 should be launched when disease incidence is low. Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Annotation . 2020
    Open Access Turkish
    Country: Turkey

    Konu başlıkları: -Covid-19 Sürecinde Erişime Açılan Yeni Veri Tabanları eBook Academic Collection, MLA International Bibliography with Full Text, Political Science Complete, Scientific & Medical ART Imagebase.