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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
56 Research products, page 1 of 6

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • CA
  • Education and Research Archive

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Teng Li; Xiao Meng; Mahdi Tavakoli;
    Country: Canada

    ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented extreme pressure on the medical system due to the physical distance policy, especially for procedures such as ultrasound (US) imaging, which are usually carried out in person. Tele-operation systems are a promising way to avoid physical human?robot interaction (pHRI). However, the system usually requires another robot on the remote doctor side to provide haptic feedback, which makes it expensive and complex. To reduce the cost and system complexity, in this paper, we present a low-cost, easy-to-use, dual-mode pHRI-teleHRI control system with a custom-designed hybrid admittance-force controller for US imaging. The proposed system requires only a tracking camera rather than a sophisticated robot on the remote side. An audio feedback is designed for replacing haptic feedback on the remote side, and its sufficiency is experimentally verified. The experimental results indicate that the designed hybrid controller can significantly improve the task performance in both modes. Furthermore, the proposed system enables the user to conduct US imaging while complying with the physical distance policy, and allows them to seamlessly switch modes from one to another in an online manner. The novel system can be easily adapted to other medical applications beyond the pandemic, such as tele-healthcare, palpation, and auscultation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sierra L. P. Tulloch; Devon J. Chazan; Lauren D. Goegan; Lia M. Daniels;
    Country: Canada

    The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted young adults’ physical and mental health. As such, it is imperative that we examine how this life-altering event has influenced their thinking about their bodies despite imminent stress and change. Therefore, we examined young adults’ body appreciation and wellbeing by comparing secondary data of young adults’ ratings on the Body Appreciation Scale 2, before the COVID-19 pandemic, to young adults during the pandemic. Additionally, we examined how body appreciation may have been influenced by pandemic impacts, such as overall physical health, mental health, socioeconomic status, and the increase of videoconferencing communication methods. Independent-samples t-tests determined that ratings of body appreciation were significantly lower for the pandemic sample compared to the pre-pandemic sample (t=4.44 , p=.000). A simple linear regression accounted for 27.3% of the variance in body appreciation, F(5, 274)=21.94, p<0.001. Specifically, overall physical health and impact of videoconferencing methods negatively predicted body appreciation (β =-.335, p<.001; β =-.380, p<.001). We will utilize these results to foster discussion around the importance of bolstering body appreciation and encouraging positive health behaviours in current health care practices as well as informing future preventative efforts and intervention.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Parker, Patti C.; Tulloch, Sierra L. P.; Chazan, Devon J.; Pelletier, Gabrielle N.; Daniels, Lia M.;
    Country: Canada

    Setbacks in sport are common and particularly relevant to current athletes because of the sport interruptions that resulted from COVID-19. Given the prevalence of mental health and body image issues reported in athletes, we considered factors impacting athletes’ setback-related anxiety about body image. Along with known correlates, such as negative affect (Rex & Metler, 2016), that are linked to setback anxiety, we sought to examine additional demographic and psychosocial factors that contribute to setback-related anxiety about body image. We employed a 2-step hierarchical regression with a sample of North American postsecondary athletes (N = 110, Mage = 21) who reflected on a sport setback. Our findings revealed rumination and negative affect were significantly and positively linked to anxiety about body image, but positive affect was unrelated. These findings highlight possible psychological and emotional aspects that contribute to athlete anxiety about their bodies when facing setbacks, particularly setbacks related to COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zarghanishiraz, Reza; Mojtaba, Zabihi; Little, Jonathan; Komisar, Vivki; Li, Ri;
    Country: Canada

    For centuries, people have been fighting airborne transmitting diseases like the common cold virus, influenza or Measles and Tuberculosis as examples of more fatal diseases. Certainly, one of the most catastrophic viruses among the airborne transmitting diseases is Covid-19 which has taken millions of lives in the past three years. Although vaccines have significantly diminished the rate of deaths, periodic emergence of different variants like Delta and Omicron proves that vaccination is not a substitution for the virus-spread controlling methods. Subsequently, it is still necessary to prevent the spread of the virus from the very beginning by using masks and sterilizing the air in indoor spaces. In the present work, a novel method for both trapping and inactivation of the airborne transmitting pathogens is provided. Contaminated air passes through multiple layers of fine woven meshes while the mesh is acting as both a filter to remove the airborne particles and also as a heating element to raise the air temperature. D50 = 0.9 μm which means that 50%-removal efficiency occurs for 0.9 μm particles in this device. According to the exponential relationship of the temperature and the exposure time models, taking the air to high temperatures like 150°C provides 3-log virus load reduction (i.e. 99.9% inactivation of the viruses) in a fraction of a second. Numerical simulations are conducted using ANSYS Fluent software and experimental tests are in progress to validate the numerical data. Part of Proceedings of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering International Congress 2022

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wu, Jing; Luo, Hao; Zhong, Lexuan;
    Country: Canada

    Adequate ventilation with an effective airflow pattern and the air handling unit equipped with air purifier devices are common contaminant control methods for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Air cleaner purification performance, ventilation modes, and contaminant transportation need to be further explored to offer the safest indoor environment, especially under and post the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this study developed a pilot-scale HVAC test rig to support various research initiatives. The setup was mainly composed of a square duct with the integration of an air filtration/purification testing system and 3 chambers with the ability to control the ventilation modes. The prequalification tests of the facility, including air leakage, velocity and aerosol uniformity, airflow and flow control verification tests, were conducted to show its feasibility. Results of the filter test were discussed as an example to show potential applications of the test rig. This paper can offer insights for future research about HVAC effectiveness. Part of the Proceedings of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering International Congress 2022.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zabihi, Mojtaba; Li, Ri; Brinkerhoff, Joshua; Little, Jonathan; Winkler, Jake;
    Country: Canada

    It has been more than two years since the COVID-19 pandemic has changed our world. Schools cannot be closed forever and now it is the time for everyone to go back to work. Classrooms are among the highest risk places because of their nature. Where many students are sitting for hours and one infected person can pass the disease to many others because of the long exposure time. In this research a classroom occupied with 20 students and a lecturer is considered. An unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of two-phase flows based on a Discrete Phase Model (DPM) is carried out to study the spreading of aerosol and droplets in the classroom. The simulation includes momentum and heat between the particles and the air flow. All the 21 simulated humans in the classroom generate heat and also inhale and exhale to mimic living persons. The lecturer generates aerosols and droplets for 15 minutes and when he stops the simulation continues before the next class begins. Transport and surface deposition of various sizes of small aerosols (from 1 μm) and large droplets (up to100 μm) are studied. The result showed that the natural convection flow has a significant effect on the aerosol particles but not much on the large droplets. It has to be included in the numerical simulation of aerosol transport where humans are present in the room. Based on the fallow time study, it is recommended to schedule the lectures with at least a 20 minutes interval to minimize the risk of spread of airborne diseases. Part of Proceedings of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering International Congress 2022

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kendra Wells;
    Country: Canada

    Dr. Daniels and her team from the Alberta Consortium for Motivation and Emotion surveyed pre-service teachers in Winter Term 2022. This research brief outlines some findings related to pre-service teachers' beliefs, worries, and feelings in light of COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Parker, Patti C.; Pelletier, Gabrielle N.; Daniels, Lia M.; Mosewich, Amber D.;
    Country: Canada

    Whether engaging in sport at the elite or recreational level, setback experiences in sport are inevitable and can be detrimental for motivation. Furthermore, across the globe, sport setbacks are particularly critical to study in light of the COVID-19 pandemic interrupting athletes’ sport seasons. The study objective was to compare the motivational and emotional responses of athletes reflecting on a setback they had experienced (or were presently experiencing). Thus, our study comprised two groups: 130 athletes with a past setback and 68 athletes with a current setback. North American athletes in postsecondary settings responded to online survey questions pertaining to the experience of a sport setback (e.g., past or current, severity, COVID-19 context), achievement goals in sport, setback-related emotions, and demographic information. Independent sample t-tests revealed that compared to athletes who had experienced a past setback, athletes currently experiencing a setback indicated greater guilt, shame, and perceptions of setback severity . Concerning achievement motivation, these athletes also reported lower task approach goals than their counterparts who had experienced a past setback. Additionally, 144 athletes from the full sample reported they were currently playing a competitive sport, and 54 were not. Finally, of the 68 currently experiencing a setback, 25% indicated their setback was related to COVID-19 (e.g., gym closures, fear of COVID-19, loss of motivation/effort) and many of the non-related COVID-19 setbacks were sport injuries. These findings illuminate the potentially harmful effects of setback experiences “in the moment” on athletes’ motivation and mental health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Calkins, Kasandra;
    Country: Canada

    Current research on the behavioral immune system postulates that avoiding out-group members is one strategy that individuals use to avoid contracting infection. The present study tested whether different news headlines related to the COVID-19 pandemic would evoke a disgust reaction in Canadian native-speaker participants by altering their perceptions of accent similarity to 3 different groups of speakers: native speakers of English, and speakers with both familiar and unfamiliar foreign accents. Participants were primed with news headlines unrelated to COVID-19 in the control condition, which preceded the two COVID conditions presenting headlines either emphasizing (COVID-severe) or downplaying (COVID-downplay) the severity of COVID-19. After rating headlines for each condition, participants listened to 24 recordings of 12 different speakers and rated how similar their accent was to the speech they heard. Analysis using ordinal Generalized Additive Mixed Models revealed an interaction between speaker group and headline prime; participants rated the accents of other native speakers as sounding less similar after viewing the COVID-severe and COVID-downplay headline primes compared to the control primes. No significant differences were found between headline prime and the familiar or unfamiliar foreign accented speakers, suggesting that a disgust response was evoked in participants solely towards in-group members (native speakers) after reading headlines mentioning COVID-19. The disgust response likely created psychological distance towards in-group members, altering perceptions of other native speakers of English who are likely to pass infection on during a pandemic. This result provides evidence against theories that outgroup members are automatically distanced under a pathogen threat (Reid et al. 2012) and support for the view that disease avoidance behaviors are governed by threat specific knowledge, creating aversion to individuals who are likely to spread infection, regardless of group membership status.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eszter Rosta;
    Country: Canada

    fifty-nine events is a thesis exhibition that speculates the affordances of form in mediated performance art and issues of performance art documentation and (re)presentation. An art historical overview of performance art theories and praxes contextualizes and re-visits debates of performance art documentation and its (re)presentation, situating mediation as inherent to any cultural form or product. Contextualizing performance art through the global COVID-19 pandemic provides a point of entry in re-considering the intersubjectivities and object-relations of performance art and performance art documentation as historically contingent, rather than ontologically fixed. An open call for participation circulated through various media becomes the subsequent mode of inquiry; a one-year performance project mobilizes and puts into practice questions and ideas explored earlier. Finally, the thesis exhibition is realized as a cumulation of performance-based video works developed in response to the open call for participation, whereby the artist solicits, collects, and (re)performs over one-hundred performance instruction scores submitted by a mediated public. With a number of sudden deaths in the artists’ family over the course of the project, the works coalesce actions performed in response to a digitally mediated public and actions performed in response to personal tragedy. Made largely during a period of governmental mandatory social distancing, this thesis exhibition attempts to articulate and re-imagine what the very form of performance art, its (re)presentation, and mediation affords in contemporary happenings.