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654 Research products, page 1 of 66

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Xiong, Lin; James, Imaobong; Hardwick, Jialin;
    Publisher: Edward Elgar
    Country: United Kingdom

    Research on African women entrepreneurs operating UK micro and small businesses demonstrates how the agency in enterprising works ethnicity and identity through social capital that fosters businesses. It showed that the shared "otherness" of ethnic identity is accompanied by a shared sense of ethnic responsibility and social obligation. In time, this spilt over into bridging social capital and connecting to the wider community. This study builds on previous research and provides an understanding of how self-employed women migrants in the UK operate to counter the perceptions of socially constructed values. Social capital may depend on frequent interaction and social proximity, both are difficult during times of isolation and social distancing. The COVID-19 crisis thus works as a stress test for the utility of social relations and social capital. Combating social exclusion is one of the most important issues at the present time, and particularly affects those currently socially marginalised. But social exclusion need not be a permanent condition. Entrepreneurship has been shown to facilitate economic and social integration. Recent studies report how gender and living situation relates to the use of digital communication for social connection and changes in digital media use may outlast Covid 19 pandemic. Women-led businesses are looking at new ways of working using digital platforms. We examine the complex nature of social exclusion and inclusion; the strategies, practices, and the process of women employing online digital platforms to connect to the wider community and facilitate social integration. We also examined how they responded to developing theory, explanations, and accounts of effective practices to facilitate social inclusion for marketing. Our research sample is based on self-employment and intersectional characteristics including gender and ethnicity. Our sample conforms to the criteria: each self-employed woman owns the business and operates the business for at least 2 years. We identified suitable respondents through purposeful sampling, which links the sampling strategy with the purpose of the research project, which is more concerned with what people do. We consider our potential respondents are subject to the intersectional nature of exclusion and disadvantage associated with being identified as female and migrants, cultural strangers. We interviewed sixteen female migrant entrepreneurs before and after the COVID-19 outbreak to examine their entrepreneurial enactment and how they mobilised their ethnicity and identity to overcome disadvantages through social resourcing and the use of digital resources for marketing. Data were analysed thematically using the constant comparative method which involves a recursive sense-making of the data to identify emerging categories and themes.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pearson, Amelia; Mcphillips, Rebecca; Clarkson, Paul; Allen, Rosie; Robinson, Catherine;
    Publisher: International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols
    Country: United Kingdom

    The primary objective of this scoping review is to understand the extent and type of evidence in relation to moral injury in social work staff. The secondary objective is to establish how moral injury has been defined in the literature in the context of social work. The review question is: what is currently known about moral injury in social work staff?

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hartman, Susan;
    Publisher: National Oceanography Centre
    Country: United Kingdom

    RRS James Cook cruise 231 departed Southampton 1st May 2022, operated in the Whittard Canyon (2-3 May) and the Porcupine Abyssal Plain Sustained Observatory area (4-16th May), returning to Southampton 19th May 2022. The goal of the cruise was to continue time-series observations of the surface ocean, water column, and seafloor at the site, as first studied by NOC (then the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences) in 1985. Also, to service a mooring at Whittard Canyon. These activities are supported by CLASS and EU project iFADO. Additional goals were to deploy a BGC Argo float and investigate particle flux (ANTICS team onboard, with some AtlantECO support). The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic resulted in reduced staff onboard but all operations were completed before the weather changed on 16th May. The main aims were to recover data and infrastructure and deploy replacement moorings at PAP and in the Whittard Canyon, to continue time series sampling at PAP-SO. The Met Office Mobilis buoy was successfully recovered and a similar one was redeployed with a sensor frame at 30m. The sediment traps were successfully turned around at both PAP and the Whittard canyon, this time deploying an Anderson trap. A series of water column observation and sampling operations were successfully carried out with a CTD instrument package. The CTD deployments included pre-and post-deployment calibrations of PAP1 and PAP3 sensors. Surface to 600m observations were made with a new camera frame plus Marine Snow Catchers (the old and new ‘Yuki’ style were used). Other water column observations included underway CO2 SubCtech system and day/night zooplankton nets. The benthic time series was continued with a series of seafloor sediment core sampling, amphipod traps and trawling. A Met Office Biogeochemistry Argo float was deployed but had to be recovered when it developed a fault.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    MacArtney, J.I.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: UKRI | The impact and implicatio... (ES/W001837/1)

    Shalene Langen-Datta, Marie Curie Policy and Public Affairs Officer, Marie Curie, 89 Albert Embankment, London, SE1 7TP, shalene.datta@mariecurie.org.uk Helen Wesson, Research Assistant, Unit of Academic Primary Care, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill, CV4 7AL, helen.wesson@warwick.ac.uk Dr Joanna Fleming, Senior Research Fellow, Unit of Academic Primary Care, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill, CV4 7AL, j.l.m.fleming@warwick.ac.uk Dr Abi Eccles, Research Fellow, Unit of Academic Primary Care, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill, CV4 7AL, a.eccles@warwick.ac.uk Dr Catherine Grimley, Research Assistant, Unit of Academic Primary Care, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill, CV4 7AL, catherine.grimley@warwick.ac.uk Professor Jeremy Dale, Professor of Primary Care, Unit of Academic Primary Care, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill, CV4 7AL, jeremy.dale@warwick.ac.uk Professor Kathryn Almack, Professor, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9AB k.almack@herts.ac.uk Dr Catriona Rachel Mayland, Senior Clinical Research Fellow, Department of Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, S10 2TN, c.r.mayland@sheffield.ac.uk Dr Sarah Mitchell, Senior Clinical Fellow, Department of Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, S10 2TN, s.j.mitchell@sheffield.ac.uk Ruth Driscoll, Associate Director for Policy and Public Affairs England, Marie Curie, 89 Albert Embankment, London, SE1 7TP, Ruth.Driscoll@mariecurie.org.uk Lynn Tatnell, Patient and Public Involvement representative, lynntatnell@gmail.com, (private email address not to be published) Lesley Roberts, Patient and Public Involvement representative, lesley.roberts.1944@gmail.com (private email address not to be published) Dr John I MacArtney, Marie Curie Associate Professor, Unit of Academic Primary Care, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill, CV4 7AL john.macartney@warwick.ac.uk

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kollias, Dimitrios; Arsenos, Anastasios; Kollias, Stefanos;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper presents the baseline approach for the organized 2nd Covid-19 Competition, occurring in the framework of the AIMIA Workshop in the European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV 2022). It presents the COV19-CT-DB database which is annotated for COVID-19 detection, consisting of about 7,700 3-D CT scans. Part of the database consisting of Covid-19 cases is further annotated in terms of four Covid-19 severity conditions. We have split the database and the latter part of it in training, validation and test datasets. The former two datasets are used for training and validation of machine learning models, while the latter is used for evaluation of the developed models. The baseline approach consists of a deep learning approach, based on a CNN-RNN network and report its performance on the COVID19-CT-DB database. The paper presents the results of both Challenges organised in the framework of the Competition, also compared to the performance of the baseline scheme.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrews, S; Duggan, P;
    Publisher: Emergency Planning Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    This Toolkit is a direct outcome of the research project ‘Social Distancing and Reimagining City Life: Performative strategies and practices for response and recovery in and beyond lockdown’ (AH/V013734/1). Available at the Emergency Planning Society website: https://the-eps.org/toolkit/. Personal debriefing is critical to emergency planning. In this Toolkit, we introduce creative strategies that offer new methods of engaging in personal debriefing, both for individuals and to support team approaches. We start from understanding emergency planning ‘as’ performance (as explored at our EPS Huddle, 30th March 2022 and in publications) to introduce and investigate performance processes as creative, flexible, and dynamic strategies for personal debriefing. Too often, creative practice is understood through finished artworks or performances, yet many of the processes that arts practitioners use in making work offer creative, individually-nuanced ways of making sense of events or situations. The Toolkit offers a range of strategies for personal debriefing that we have developed through our work with emergency and resilience planning professionals in the UK and USA. Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the UK Research and Innovation’s Covid-19 Rapid Response call.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Baral, Stefan; Rao, Amrita; Rwema, Jean Olivier Twahirwa; Lyons, Carrie; Cevik, Muge; Kågesten, Anna E.; Diouf, Daouda; Sohn, Annette H.; Phaswana-Mafuya, Refilwe Nancy; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; +3 more
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funding: Amrita Rao is supported in part by the National Institute of Mental Health [F31MH124458]. Carrie Lyons is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health [F31MH128079] and by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Johns Hopkins HIV Epidemiology and Prevention Sciences Training Program [T32AI102623-08]. Julia Marcus is supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [K01AI122853]. Sharmistha Mishra is supported by a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Modeling. Refilwe Nancy Phaswana-Mafuya is supported by the South African Medical Research Council. Background : COVID-19 has rapidly emerged as a global public health threat with infections recorded in nearly every country. Responses to COVID-19 have varied in intensity and breadth, but generally have included domestic and international travel limitations, closure of non-essential businesses, and repurposing of health services. While these interventions have focused on testing, treatment, and mitigation of COVID-19, there have been reports of interruptions to diagnostic, prevention, and treatment services for other public health threats. Objectives : We conducted a scoping review to characterize the early impact of COVID-19 on HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, sexual and reproductive health, and malnutrition. Methods : A scoping literature review was completed using searches of PubMed and preprint servers (medRxiv/bioRxiv) from November 1st, 2019 to October 31st, 2020, using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms related to SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19 and HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, sexual and reproductive health, and malnutrition. Empiric studies reporting original data collection or mathematical models were included, and available data synthesized by region. Studies were excluded if they were not written in English. Results : A total of 1604 published papers and 205 preprints were retrieved in the search. Overall, 8.0% (129/1604) of published studies and 10.2% (21/205) of preprints met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review: 7.3% (68/931) on HIV, 7.1% (24/339) on tuberculosis, 11.6% (26/224) on malaria, 7.8% (19/183) on sexual and reproductive health, and 9.8% (13/132) on malnutrition. Thematic results were similar across competing health risks, with substantial indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and response on diagnostic, prevention, and treatment services for HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, sexual and reproductive health, and malnutrition. Discussion : COVID-19 emerged in the context of existing public health threats that result in millions of deaths every year. Thus, effectively responding to COVID-19 while minimizing the negative impacts of COVID-19 necessitates innovation and integration of existing programs that are often siloed across health systems. Inequities have been a consistent driver of existing health threats; COVID-19 has worsened disparities, reinforcing the need for programs that address structural risks. The data reviewed here suggest that effective strengthening of health systems should include investment and planning focused on ensuring the continuity of care for both rapidly emergent and existing public health threats. Publisher PDF Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pensiero, Nicola; Bokhove, Christian;
    Publisher: University of Southampton
    Country: United Kingdom

    Dr Nic Pensiero and Dr Christian Bokhove join us for the first episode of a brand new season of The Policy Pod. They discuss the UK Understanding Society 2020 and 2021 data, which is the largest longitudinal study of its kind and allowed crucial insights into household dynamics during the Covid-19 pandemic. The data indicates that existing learning inequalities were exacerbated during the first school closure, and whilst these didn't worsen during the second, our guests question why they did not altogether reduce. Answering this may lie in considering the role of the home in addition to provisions from schools. Also discussed are the National Tutoring Programme, learning loss, the examinations fiasco, teacher assessed grades and...breathing patterns.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elston, T;
    Publisher: UK in a Changing Europe
    Country: United Kingdom

    Resilience, the ability to maintain functioning during sudden and severe adversity, is a critical requirement of public services. Brexit and Covid-19 tested government’s resilience, and necessitated some undesirable trade-offs.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hardwick, Jialin; Xiong, Lin; James, Imaobong;
    Publisher: University of Lincoln
    Country: United Kingdom

    Involving and responding to customers and creating customer memorable experiences are of key concerns to owner/managers in establishing and developing customer relationships, entailed by shared value. Collaborating with customers is not only driven by a customer-centred business orientation but also by users’ initiation. Digital technologies play a key role in facilitating the collaboration, this is particularly true during Covid-19 pandemic in which the crisis resulted in disruptions and hence exceptional barriers to owners-managers in maintaining connected with customers. However, little research has been available to provide references to small businesses in the context, this research investigates those owned by women migrant entrepreneurs, the hard-reach minority groups in the UK constrained by limited access to resources, sustained the crisis using digital technologies. We’re interested in exploring how the small businesses survived the crisis the maintenance with customers, the key stakeholder group and how digital technologies played a key role in mitigating the negative effects on their business practices and value created through working with customers. We collected samples of self-employed African women entrepreneurs who were owner-managers of micro and small business in Aberdeen, UK underpinned, carried out in-depth interviews with sixteen respondents for looking into their life experiences. Employing thematic data analysis with the constant comparative methods, we enclose the findings by making sense of the lived experiences of the entrepreneurs.