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  • Authors: Musango, Laurent; Veerapa-Mangroo, Lovena; Joomaye, Zouber; Ghurbhurrun, Adarshini; +2 Authors

    The COVID-19 response in Mauritius, which is viewed as a success story, benefited from strong leadership, highest political engagement, and strong involvement of the WHO, the private sector and other key stakeholders. Another key success factor lies in clear, transparent and consistent communication, including feedback mechanisms to understand public perception, the result of which is good adherence by the population. Public health measures (quarantine, contact tracing, case investigation and isolation of contacts, mass testing) have also contributed to the success of the country in the fight against COVID-19. The Mauritian success story can be inspiring for other countries, especially regarding the importance of adapting measures to evolving knowledge and developing a clear and consistent communication policy so as to buy the adherence of the population. However, contextual factors (an island has a limited number of entry points) have also facilitated the implementation and success of these measures. Not all countries can expect similar results by copy-pasting the Mauritian response strategy and should probably adopt a comprehensive policy acting on various factors to fight the pandemic.

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  • Authors: El Moussaoui, Majdouline; Desmecht, Salomé; Lambert, Nicolas; Maes, Nathalie; +15 Authors

    (1) Background: Many vaccines require higher, additional doses or adjuvants to provide adequate protection for people living with HIV (PLWH). Despite their potential risk of severe coronavirus disease 2019, immunological data remain sparse, and a clear consensus for the best booster strategy is lacking. (2) Methods: Using the data obtained from our previous study assessing prospective T-cell and humoral immune responses before and after administration of a third dose of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, we assessed the correlations between immune parameters reflecting humoral and cellular immune responses. We further aimed at identifying distinct clusters of patients with similar patterns of immune response evolution to determine how these relate to demographic and clinical factors. (3) Results: Among 80 PLWH and 51 healthcare workers (HCWs) enrolled in the study, cluster analysis identified four distinct patterns of evolution characterised by specific immune patterns and clinical factors. We observed that immune responses appeared to be less robust in cluster A, whose individuals were mostly PLWH who had never been infected with SARS-CoV-2. Cluster C, whose individuals showed a particularly drastic increase in markers of humoral immune response following the third dose of vaccine, was mainly composed of female participants who experienced SARS-CoV-2. Regarding the correlation study, although we observed a strong positive correlation between markers mirroring humoral immune response, markers of T-cell response following vaccination correlated only in a lesser extent with markers of humoral immunity. This suggests that neutralising antibody titers alone are not always a reliable reflection of the magnitude of the whole immune response. (4) Conclusions: Our findings show heterogeneity in immune responses among SARS-CoV-2 vaccinated PLWH. Specific subgroups could therefore benefit from distinct immunization strategies. Prior or breakthrough natural infection enhances the activity of vaccines and must be taken into account for informing global vaccine strategies among PLWH, even those with a viro-immunologically controlled infection.

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  • Authors: Saegerman, Claude; Donneau, Anne-Françoise; Speybroeck, Niko; Diep, Anh Nguyet; +14 Authors

    Nursing home (NH) residents and staff have been severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to examine the use of weekly saliva RT-qPCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 detection among NH workers as a strategy to control disease transmission within NHs in Belgium. From 16 November to 27 December 2020, a voluntary and anonymous weekly screening was implemented in a cohort of 50,000 workers across 572 NHs in the Walloon region of Belgium to detect asymptomatic cases of SARS-CoV-2 via saliva RT-qPCR testing and using the Diagenode saliva sample collection device. Positive workers were isolated to avoid subsequent infections in residents and other staff. RT-qPCR testing was based on pooled saliva sampling techniques from three workers, followed by individual testing of each positive or inconclusive pool. The majority of NHs (85%) and 55% of their workers participated. Pooling did not affect sensitivity as it only induced a very decrease in sensitivity estimated as 0.33%. Significant decreases in the prevalence (34.4-13.4%) and incidence of NHs with either single (13.8-2%) or multiple positive workers (3.7-0%) were observed over time. In addition, deaths among NH residents and NH worker absences decreased significantly over time. Weekly saliva RT-qPCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 demonstrated large-scale feasibility and efficacy in disrupting the chain of transmission. Implementation of this testing strategy in NHs could also be extended to other settings with the aim to control viral transmission for maintaining essential activities.

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  • Authors: Glowacz, Fabienne; Dziewa, Amandine; Schmits, Emilie;

    Background: This study took place in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The present research assesses the association between lockdown conditions (such as time spent at home, living environment, proximity to contamination and social contacts), mental health (including intolerance of uncertainty, anxiety and depression) and intimate partner violence within the community. This study evaluates the indirect effect of anxiety and depression on the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and intimate partner violence (physical assault and psychological aggression). Methods: 1532 adults (80.8% of women, Mage = 35.34) were recruited from the Belgian general population through an online self-report questionnaire completed during the lockdown (from April 17 to 1 May 2020 ). Results : The results demonstrate that the prevalence of physical assault (including both perpetration and victimization) was significantly higher in men, whereas the prevalence of psychological aggression was significantly higher in women. Men reported significantly more violence during lockdown. Women, on the other hand, were more anxious and more intolerant of uncertainty. No difference between men and women was found for depression. Anxiety and depression significantly mediated the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and physical assault and psychological aggression. Sex did not moderate the mediation. Conclusion: Clinical implications for public health policy are highlighted

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  • Authors: Jamoulle, Marc;

    suivi d'une cohorte de patients Long Covid en médecine de famille. Partage de savoir avec un groupe de médecin.

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  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Tartari, Morena;
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Institutional Reposi...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
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      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Institutional Reposi...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
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  • Authors: Demonceau, Céline; Buckinx, Fanny; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Bruyère, Olivier;
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  • Authors: Miny, Xavier; Kéfer, Fabienne; Dachouffe, France;

    Les mesures prises par les autorités belges pour endiguer l’épidémie de Covid-19 ont durement frappé la vie socio-économique du pays. Fermetures temporaires d’entreprises, réduction des périodes d’ouverture des commerces, protocoles sanitaires, interdiction de vente de certains produits, travail à domicile, obligations de quarantaine, etc. Bouleversant la production, la distribution et l’offre de biens et de services, ces mesures ont entrainé de graves difficultés économiques pour les entreprises. Elles affectent tout autant les travailleurs, aussi bien ceux qui ne peuvent temporairement pas travailler que ceux qui sont contraints de continuer leurs activités chez eux ou bien sur leur lieu de travail habituel. Ces mesures, de nature temporaire, adoptées sous le bénéfice de l’urgence, sont régulièrement modifiées pour s’adapter en permanence à la situation sanitaire. Outre le résumé de la législation adoptée durant les confinements successifs de 2020 et 2021, cette contribution interroge son impact sur les principaux acteurs du marché au regard de la liberté d’entreprise, de la libre concurrence et des droits des travailleurs, et ce, sous le prisme des contentieux juridictionnels et des controverses doctrinales qu’elle a suscitées.

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  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Somville, Francis; Van Bogaert, P; Vercauteren, Leonie; De Cauwer, Harald; +4 Authors
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Vrije Universiteit B...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
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      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Vrije Universiteit B...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
  • Authors: Verpoorten, Dominique;

    L’enseignement à distance met bien plus que trois mètres hygiéniques entre les personnes. Un recours possible pour une éducation en quarantaine ?

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1,035 Research products
  • Authors: Musango, Laurent; Veerapa-Mangroo, Lovena; Joomaye, Zouber; Ghurbhurrun, Adarshini; +2 Authors

    The COVID-19 response in Mauritius, which is viewed as a success story, benefited from strong leadership, highest political engagement, and strong involvement of the WHO, the private sector and other key stakeholders. Another key success factor lies in clear, transparent and consistent communication, including feedback mechanisms to understand public perception, the result of which is good adherence by the population. Public health measures (quarantine, contact tracing, case investigation and isolation of contacts, mass testing) have also contributed to the success of the country in the fight against COVID-19. The Mauritian success story can be inspiring for other countries, especially regarding the importance of adapting measures to evolving knowledge and developing a clear and consistent communication policy so as to buy the adherence of the population. However, contextual factors (an island has a limited number of entry points) have also facilitated the implementation and success of these measures. Not all countries can expect similar results by copy-pasting the Mauritian response strategy and should probably adopt a comprehensive policy acting on various factors to fight the pandemic.

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  • Authors: El Moussaoui, Majdouline; Desmecht, Salomé; Lambert, Nicolas; Maes, Nathalie; +15 Authors

    (1) Background: Many vaccines require higher, additional doses or adjuvants to provide adequate protection for people living with HIV (PLWH). Despite their potential risk of severe coronavirus disease 2019, immunological data remain sparse, and a clear consensus for the best booster strategy is lacking. (2) Methods: Using the data obtained from our previous study assessing prospective T-cell and humoral immune responses before and after administration of a third dose of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, we assessed the correlations between immune parameters reflecting humoral and cellular immune responses. We further aimed at identifying distinct clusters of patients with similar patterns of immune response evolution to determine how these relate to demographic and clinical factors. (3) Results: Among 80 PLWH and 51 healthcare workers (HCWs) enrolled in the study, cluster analysis identified four distinct patterns of evolution characterised by specific immune patterns and clinical factors. We observed that immune responses appeared to be less robust in cluster A, whose individuals were mostly PLWH who had never been infected with SARS-CoV-2. Cluster C, whose individuals showed a particularly drastic increase in markers of humoral immune response following the third dose of vaccine, was mainly composed of female participants who experienced SARS-CoV-2. Regarding the correlation study, although we observed a strong positive correlation between markers mirroring humoral immune response, markers of T-cell response following vaccination correlated only in a lesser extent with markers of humoral immunity. This suggests that neutralising antibody titers alone are not always a reliable reflection of the magnitude of the whole immune response. (4) Conclusions: Our findings show heterogeneity in immune responses among SARS-CoV-2 vaccinated PLWH. Specific subgroups could therefore benefit from distinct immunization strategies. Prior or breakthrough natural infection enhances the activity of vaccines and must be taken into account for informing global vaccine strategies among PLWH, even those with a viro-immunologically controlled infection.

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  • Authors: Saegerman, Claude; Donneau, Anne-Françoise; Speybroeck, Niko; Diep, Anh Nguyet; +14 Authors

    Nursing home (NH) residents and staff have been severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to examine the use of weekly saliva RT-qPCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 detection among NH workers as a strategy to control disease transmission within NHs in Belgium. From 16 November to 27 December 2020, a voluntary and anonymous weekly screening was implemented in a cohort of 50,000 workers across 572 NHs in the Walloon region of Belgium to detect asymptomatic cases of SARS-CoV-2 via saliva RT-qPCR testing and using the Diagenode saliva sample collection device. Positive workers were isolated to avoid subsequent infections in residents and other staff. RT-qPCR testing was based on pooled saliva sampling techniques from three workers, followed by individual testing of each positive or inconclusive pool. The majority of NHs (85%) and 55% of their workers participated. Pooling did not affect sensitivity as it only induced a very decrease in sensitivity estimated as 0.33%. Significant decreases in the prevalence (34.4-13.4%) and incidence of NHs with either single (13.8-2%) or multiple positive workers (3.7-0%) were observed over time. In addition, deaths among NH residents and NH worker absences decreased significantly over time. Weekly saliva RT-qPCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 demonstrated large-scale feasibility and efficacy in disrupting the chain of transmission. Implementation of this testing strategy in NHs could also be extended to other settings with the aim to control viral transmission for maintaining essential activities.

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  • Authors: Glowacz, Fabienne; Dziewa, Amandine; Schmits, Emilie;

    Background: This study took place in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The present research assesses the association between lockdown conditions (such as time spent at home, living environment, proximity to contamination and social contacts), mental health (including intolerance of uncertainty, anxiety and depression) and intimate partner violence within the community. This study evaluates the indirect effect of anxiety and depression on the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and intimate partner violence (physical assault and psychological aggression). Methods: 1532 adults (80.8% of women, Mage = 35.34) were recruited from the Belgian general population through an online self-report questionnaire completed during the lockdown (from April 17 to 1 May 2020 ). Results : The results demonstrate that the prevalence of physical assault (including both perpetration and victimization) was significantly higher in men, whereas the prevalence of psychological aggression was significantly higher in women. Men reported significantly more violence during lockdown. Women, on the other hand, were more anxious and more intolerant of uncertainty. No difference between men and women was found for depression. Anxiety and depression significantly mediated the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and physical assault and psychological aggression. Sex did not moderate the mediation. Conclusion: Clinical implications for public health policy are highlighted

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  • Authors: Jamoulle, Marc;

    suivi d'une cohorte de patients Long Covid en médecine de famille. Partage de savoir avec un groupe de médecin.

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  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Tartari, Morena;
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Institutional Reposi...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
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      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao