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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
10 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • 2021-2021
  • CA
  • English
  • VIUSpace
  • COVID-19

Date (most recent)
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Schmid, Jeanette; Bradley, Holly;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    This research has aimed to identify the ways in which social service delivery in the mid-Island region of Vancouver Island has shifted because of COVID-19 conditions. Prompted by initial informal comments regarding the effect of the pandemic, we initiated an 18-month research process that checked in with representatives of social service agencies at six-month intervals. The study offers a local perspective that may have insights and lessons relevant to social service organizations elsewhere. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25255/SchmidBradley2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burns, Hayley;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Tourism has been affected on a global scale due to the novel coronavirus. Governments of all levels are trying to navigate how to move forward with the tourism industry in order to support best practices whilst addressing challenges that hinder economic prosperity, such as social distancing and border closures. This work focuses on identifying the local government planning and tourism resilience practices that are being put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, establishing the role of the local government planner in tourism resilience planning practices. Research was first acquired through a literature review and providing the Vancouver Island context. Additionally, four information interviews were conducted with destination management organization professionals and community planners on Vancouver Island. Lastly, a survey was sent out to local government planners on Vancouver Island in order to reach a larger scope of participants. Concluding this thesis are a set of recommendations rooted in local government jurisdiction for the planning profession, moving forward. Thesis/major project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Community Planning in the Department of Community Planning, Faculty of Social Sciences. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24390/BurnsThesis.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holland, Mark;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In this paper, urban planner, development consultant and educator, Mark Holland, outlines a rethinking of urban structure that will be supercharged as we learn from the impacts of COVID 19 on our cities. The modern city region has been focused on building high density downtowns and peripheral town centres, based on assumptions that are now out of date as a basis for regional planning. COVID 19 closed our downtowns and we now need to reinvent our urban and regional patterns in light of what we have (re)discovered from our pandemic response. Restructuring our economy, social patterns, food systems and regional growth patterns into a network of high-street-based corridors will not only make us more resilient to shocks like COVID 19, but overall create a much healthier, sustainable, and economically viable region. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23638/HollandFP2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ehren, M.C.M.; Madrid, R.; Romiti, Sara; Armstrong, P.W.; Fisher, P.; McWhorter, D.L.;
    Countries: Netherlands, Netherlands, Canada, United Kingdom

    The school closures necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic created a rapid shift to alternative modes of educational delivery, primarily online learning and teacher-supported home-schooling. This shift has revealed deep inequities in education systems worldwide, as many children lost access to teachers and schooling. An effective response to these changes has tested teachers’ personal capacities and individual and collective agency intensely. The research lab we report on within this paper aimed to develop a better understanding of teacher agency in meeting the challenges of the pandemic and the physical and relational enablers and constraints of their environment. Drawing on case study reports from six international contexts and a series of online discussions with research lab participants, this study explores teachers’ enactment of agency in the context of various circumstances and environments. The authors argue that it is imperative that education systems support the enhancement of teachers’ personal and collective agency in the face of continued disruption to schooling and ongoing challenges to educational equity. This is an electronic copy of an article that was originally published as: Ehren, M.C.M., Madrid, R., Romiti, S., Armstrong, P.W., Fisher, P., & McWhorter, D.L. (2021). Teaching in the COVID-19 era: Understanding the opportunities and barriers for teacher agency. Perspectives in Education, 39(1), 61-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.18820/2519593S/pie.v39.i1.5 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24447/Fisherpdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    Foreword / Pam Shaw -- Editorial / Liang (Cliff) Feng -- How 'smart' are smart cities? The case of Sidewalk Labs, Toronto / Don Alexander -- Generation urban: Financing family-friendly housing in Canada's urban centres / Kristin N. Agnello -- Corridor urbanism and the rise of the neighbourhood in the post-COVID city / Mark Holland In this issue, you will find considerations on smart cities as a way to promote critical thinking of planning students, a deep dive into the development proformas of housing units at urban cores, and detailed discussions on corridor urbanism as we learn from the impacts of COVID-19. Foreword / Pam Shaw -- Editorial / Liang (Cliff) Feng -- How 'smart' are smart cities? The case of Sidewalk Labs, Toronto / Don Alexander -- Generation urban: Financing family-friendly housing in Canada's urban centres / Kristin N. Agnello -- Corridor urbanism and the rise of the neighbourhood in the post-COVID city / Mark Holland https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23603/FuturePlansMarch2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Janzen, Nicholas J.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had a myriad of impacts and consequences for secondary school education resulting in, among other things, decreased student engagement and increased issues related to student mental health. The issues of student engagement and mental health are not borne solely from the pandemic however, and teachers have long been seeking ways to address these issues as our traditional educational paradigms lag behind in their ability to combat these problems. This Process Paper and accompanying Major Project seek to address these issues through the Critical Challenge Question, “How can gamified design increase student engagement to support improvements in mental health in secondary fine arts courses?” Photoshop Gamified is a sample gamified secondary elective course designed to introduce teachers to the principles and practice of gamification in secondary education through a research and evidence-based approach to course design and delivery. This sample gamified course utilizes the Google Suite for Education Learning Management System through the use of Google Sites, Docs, and Classroom and is intended for use in both face-to-face and blended learning environments. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25218/Janzen.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Standbridge, Geneva E.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Fully online Elementary learners face significant challenges in connecting and engaging meaningfully with other learners, their teachers, and with digitally presented and asynchronous content and instructional materials. Even though they often come to Distributed Learning (DL) programs in order to address specific and highly individual learning needs that are not being met in traditional group school settings, online students still desire and benefit from opportunities to participate and share in synchronous learning opportunities which motivate and engage in meaningful and personalized ways. The current COVID-19 situation as well as parent and student experiences with Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) have only heightened the need to find more connecting and supportive learning environments. This Process Paper utilizes current research and technologies to address the Critical Challenge Question, “How can a synchronous, gamified, and narrative-based Humanities course be designed to promote meaningful connection and engagement for fully online Grade 6 students?” A comprehensive Literature Review and application of Connectivist and Constructivist learning theory has contributed to the creation of a student website which blends synchronous and asynchronous elements. Through a narrative and gamified structure encompassing the use of points trackers, badges, and student-choice experiences, this Major Project is designed to meaningfully connect learners to their teacher and each other. Students engaging in personalized and interest-based learning opportunities while working together with their peers will experience a greater sense of connection, motivating and helping them to feel personally invested in their learning community. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25214/Standbridge.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Esliger, Bob;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Vancouver Island University (VIU), with the support of the British Columbia Council of Administrators of Inclusive Supports in Education (BCCAISE), conducted a province-wide study on the barriers and issues identified in providing equitable and accessible educational programs to students with disabilities or diverse abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. More specifically, this study looked at the district structures/frameworks that support students and staff and how those structures/ frameworks were impacted by COVID-19. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25226/Esliger2021.pdf?sequence=6

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Noon, Cheryl A.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Reggio Emilia education began in Italy following World War II. In recent years, as educational reforms have focused more on experiential, hands-on, or inquiry-based learning, the Reggio Approach has spread worldwide. However, with the Covid-19 pandemic, the Reggio Approach and its learners suffered as learning was moved online. This sudden demand for technology-based learning left students and teachers of British Columbia —and globally —in a scramble to find, adapt, or develop new pedagogy and resources, but particularly challenged the core values of Reggio programs. This project looks to unite the values and pedagogy of Reggio-inspired education with the technology-based practices that are becoming commonplace in schools. Specifically, this project is based on an intermediate elementary learning environment in a Reggio-inspired setting and examines the lack of research in these areas. The Reggio Approach is most frequently used with young students while technology-based education is used with older students and implemented by teachers who are comfortable and competent with the available tools and resources. Through this project, the gap that is intermediate elementary is examined in both the context of Reggio-inspired education and technology-based resources. Finally, this project is dedicated to merging technology into the Reggio Approach in a way that respects the philosophy. The project itself presents a number of technological resources and tools that can be used within the Reggio pedagogy https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24400/Noon.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lawrence, Anna;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between leisure, basic psychological needs, and resilience during times of uncertainty. The context of this research was conducted within leisure gardeners on Vancouver Island, Canada, during the COVID-19 pandemic. This thesis acknowledges a call to develop leisure frameworks that incorporate basic psychological needs (Gui et al., 2019a; Leithwood, 2020), and to the author’s knowledge, is the first study to investigate that in tandem with resilience and times of uncertainty. Data collection occurred over the summer months of 2020 and utilized photovoice and semi-structured interviews to document psychological implications of the pursuit. The data was thematically analyzed and indicated that all participants reported a heightened sense of resilience because of their decision to garden as a leisure pursuit. The data also indicated that leisure gardening has a positive effect on participants’ basic psychological needs, while the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative effect. A proposed framework was developed linking times of uncertainty, leisure pursuits catering towards basic psychological need criteria, and resilience, to be tested in future studies. Implications of an effective framework could inform psychological sustainability initiatives, including personal wellness strategies and disaster preparedness plans. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25991/Lawrence.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y