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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
22 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • 2013-2022
  • CA
  • English
  • VIUSpace
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór; Welling, Johannes; Müller, Dieter K.; Lundmark, Linda; Nilsson, Robert O.; de la Barre, Suzanne; Granås, Brynhild; Kvidal-Røvik, Trine; Rantala, Outi; Tervo-Kankare, Kaarina; +1 more
    Publisher: Nordic Council of Ministers
    Country: Canada

    This report was originally published as: Jóhannesson, G.T., Welling, J., Müller, D.K., Lundmark, L., Nilsson, R.O., de la Barre, S., Granås, B., Kvidal-Røvik, T., Rantala, O., Tervo-Kankare,K., & Maher, P. (2022). Arctic tourism in times of change: Uncertain futures - from overtourism to re-starting tourism. Nordic Council of Ministers. DOI: 10.6027/temanord2022-516 This report presents the findings of the third and final workshop and field course hosted by the project Partnership for Sustainability: Arctic Tourism in Times of Change funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Arctic Co-operation Programme 2018–2021. The focus of the workshop was on overtourism and the impact of and response to COVID-19 by companies and stakeholders in Arctic tourism. This publication was funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25309/delaBarre2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dames, Shannon; Kryskow, Pamela; Watler, Crosbie;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Canada

    This article was originally published as: Dames, S., Kryskow, P., & Watler, C. (2022). A cohort-based case report: The impact of ketamine-assisted therapy embedded in a community of practice framework for healthcare providers with PTSD and depression. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.803279 Amid an international pandemic and a worsening mental health crisis, ketamine-assisted therapy is emerging as a promising solution for those deemed “treatment resistant.” Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are on the rise, with accelerating direct (e.g., burden of suffering) and indirect (e.g., disability/role impairment and impact on family) costs. Psychedelic-assisted therapies show significant promise in the treatment of a number of clinically challenging conditions, including depression, anxiety, PTSD, addiction, and end-of-life distress. Ketamine is currently the only safe, effective and legal widely available psychedelic-like medicine. To address the echo pandemic of health care provider distress, a multi-disciplinary team was charged with developing a ketamine-assisted psychotherapy program, delivered in a community of practice (CoP) group model and evaluated in a quality improvement framework. Program evaluation occurred through mixed methods. Quantitative mental health assessments included the PHQ-9 for depression, the PCL-5 for PTSD, GAD-7 for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and B-IPF for work/life functionality. Participant narrative feedback was collected to evaluate outcomes and for quality improvement purposes. Mean mental health scores were collected across three cohorts, totaling 94 patients. The mean aggregate scores of participants meeting the mental health assessment cut-off criteria (screening positive) were analyzed to assess clinical significance. Mean aggregate results comparing baseline vs. outcome measures (measured within 1–2 weeks after completion of the 12-week program) were clinically significant, demonstrating significant improvements in depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and work/life functionality. In summary, 91% saw improvements in generalized anxiety, 79% saw improvements in depression, 86% of those who screened positive for PTSD now screen negative, and 92% had significant life/work functionality improvements. Qualitative feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with several unsolicited self-reports of transformation. Participant and team feedback enables the program to continue improving with each iteration. Results speak to the effectiveness of ketamine for psychedelic-assisted therapy, supported by a CoP framework. Outcomes are relevant for mental health programming, education and healthcare policy. The project was supported by Vancouver Island University, a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Knowledge Synthesis grant, a British Columbia Ministry of Health COVID-19 Research grant, the Regional Initiatives Fund, in-kind support from Island Health, the British Columbia Nurses Union, First Nations Health Authority, and philanthropic funds. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. It was originally published as: Dames, S., Kryskow, P., & Watler, C. (2022). A cohort-based case report: The impact of ketamine-assisted therapy embedded in a community of practice framework for healthcare providers with PTSD and depression. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.803279 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25308/Dames2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wicks, Donna L.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Personalizing student learning holds significance in the new British Columbia curriculum. Teachers are expected to meet individual student needs while also providing them with flexibility and choice. This is a challenging task and one that teachers have been striving to achieve for years. With the onset of the Covid-19 Pandemic, distance learning suddenly became much more mainstream, as schools all over the world were forced to teach their students online. This was a real challenge for teachers who were not familiar with online teaching and for students and families who were used to learning face-to-face in a brick-and-mortar school. In order to meet future online learning as well as to personalize student needs, it is important that teachers begin to consider adding digital learning to their teaching skills. This project is designed to support teachers who wish to continue to work with some online learning opportunities to meet individual student requirements while still participating in the face-to-face learning needs of lower primary students. This project addresses the Critical Challenge Question: How can educators use Blended Learning to contribute to effective and individualized literacy programs in the lower primary classroom? I have created a website that will support teachers who want to continue to utilize or learn about the Station Rotation model of Blended Learning to personalize their students’ academic programs and to meet their students’ individual needs. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26129/Wicks.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Swan, Cheryl E.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    As online learning continues to grow in popularity and becomes increasingly necessary with the spread of Covid-19, it is crucial for educators to offer well-developed courses that meet the requirements of their learners. A well-designed online course can enhance learning and enable students of all needs and abilities to succeed. For the most part, Open Source, senior-level Mathematics courses that are found online today lack variety and motivating content. However, motivation is essential for a student's success as it guides their actions and fosters engagement. The literature shows that for learners of Mathematics to be successful, Mathematical self-efficacy and a positive mindset are necessary. The purpose of this Process Paper was to utilize existing research and technologies to address the Critical Challenge Question, 'How can a Learning Management System be utilized to create robust and interactive, fully-online secondary Math courses to increase student motivation and engagement?' A comprehensive Literature Review and utilization of Insturcture’s Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) has contributed to the creation of a fully online, asynchronous Pre-calculus 12 course based on British Columbia’s current curriculum. Using a modularized learning approach, the aim of creating this course was to provide Maple Leaf International School (MLIS) secondary students the opportunity to learn in a well-designed, accommodating, and flexible environment that offers a means to develop self-efficacy with regard to successful learning in Mathematics. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25699/Swan.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corea, Sonja;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    In March 2020, schools in British Columbia were closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The uncertainty of the whole situation was a traumatic event for both staff and students in BC schools. Even when staff and students returned to school, teachers had to learn a new way of connecting with their students and delivering curriculum. When schools reopened, educators had to address and ensure the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) needs of their students were being met. This pandemic increased anxiety and affected the mental health of staff and students in BC schools. Using a mixed method design, I explored the relationship between mental health and social emotional learning. Through an explanatory sequential approach, I utilized questionnaires followed by one-on-one interviews as my research tools. The purpose of this research was to gather data about the effects of COVID on the mental health of staff, students, and their families, and identify which SEL practices were most commonly used and found most effective during this time. The data triangulated between the questionnaires and the one-on-one interviews resulted in five main recommendations: increased mindfulness practices within the classroom and school, opportunities to connect with each other every day, additional exercise and time spent outdoors, and implementing strategies to prevent teacher burnout. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25741/Corea.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Schmid, Jeanette; Bradley, Holly;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    This research has aimed to identify the ways in which social service delivery in the mid-Island region of Vancouver Island has shifted because of COVID-19 conditions. Prompted by initial informal comments regarding the effect of the pandemic, we initiated an 18-month research process that checked in with representatives of social service agencies at six-month intervals. The study offers a local perspective that may have insights and lessons relevant to social service organizations elsewhere. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25255/SchmidBradley2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burns, Hayley;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Tourism has been affected on a global scale due to the novel coronavirus. Governments of all levels are trying to navigate how to move forward with the tourism industry in order to support best practices whilst addressing challenges that hinder economic prosperity, such as social distancing and border closures. This work focuses on identifying the local government planning and tourism resilience practices that are being put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, establishing the role of the local government planner in tourism resilience planning practices. Research was first acquired through a literature review and providing the Vancouver Island context. Additionally, four information interviews were conducted with destination management organization professionals and community planners on Vancouver Island. Lastly, a survey was sent out to local government planners on Vancouver Island in order to reach a larger scope of participants. Concluding this thesis are a set of recommendations rooted in local government jurisdiction for the planning profession, moving forward. Thesis/major project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Community Planning in the Department of Community Planning, Faculty of Social Sciences. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24390/BurnsThesis.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holland, Mark;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In this paper, urban planner, development consultant and educator, Mark Holland, outlines a rethinking of urban structure that will be supercharged as we learn from the impacts of COVID 19 on our cities. The modern city region has been focused on building high density downtowns and peripheral town centres, based on assumptions that are now out of date as a basis for regional planning. COVID 19 closed our downtowns and we now need to reinvent our urban and regional patterns in light of what we have (re)discovered from our pandemic response. Restructuring our economy, social patterns, food systems and regional growth patterns into a network of high-street-based corridors will not only make us more resilient to shocks like COVID 19, but overall create a much healthier, sustainable, and economically viable region. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23638/HollandFP2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ehren, M.C.M.; Madrid, R.; Romiti, Sara; Armstrong, P.W.; Fisher, P.; McWhorter, D.L.;
    Countries: Canada, Netherlands, United Kingdom, United Kingdom

    The school closures necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic created a rapid shift to alternative modes of educational delivery, primarily online learning and teacher-supported home-schooling. This shift has revealed deep inequities in education systems worldwide, as many children lost access to teachers and schooling. An effective response to these changes has tested teachers’ personal capacities and individual and collective agency intensely. The research lab we report on within this paper aimed to develop a better understanding of teacher agency in meeting the challenges of the pandemic and the physical and relational enablers and constraints of their environment. Drawing on case study reports from six international contexts and a series of online discussions with research lab participants, this study explores teachers’ enactment of agency in the context of various circumstances and environments. The authors argue that it is imperative that education systems support the enhancement of teachers’ personal and collective agency in the face of continued disruption to schooling and ongoing challenges to educational equity. This is an electronic copy of an article that was originally published as: Ehren, M.C.M., Madrid, R., Romiti, S., Armstrong, P.W., Fisher, P., & McWhorter, D.L. (2021). Teaching in the COVID-19 era: Understanding the opportunities and barriers for teacher agency. Perspectives in Education, 39(1), 61-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.18820/2519593S/pie.v39.i1.5 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24447/Fisherpdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    Foreword / Pam Shaw -- Editorial / Liang (Cliff) Feng -- How 'smart' are smart cities? The case of Sidewalk Labs, Toronto / Don Alexander -- Generation urban: Financing family-friendly housing in Canada's urban centres / Kristin N. Agnello -- Corridor urbanism and the rise of the neighbourhood in the post-COVID city / Mark Holland In this issue, you will find considerations on smart cities as a way to promote critical thinking of planning students, a deep dive into the development proformas of housing units at urban cores, and detailed discussions on corridor urbanism as we learn from the impacts of COVID-19. Foreword / Pam Shaw -- Editorial / Liang (Cliff) Feng -- How 'smart' are smart cities? The case of Sidewalk Labs, Toronto / Don Alexander -- Generation urban: Financing family-friendly housing in Canada's urban centres / Kristin N. Agnello -- Corridor urbanism and the rise of the neighbourhood in the post-COVID city / Mark Holland https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23603/FuturePlansMarch2021.pdf?sequence=3

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
22 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór; Welling, Johannes; Müller, Dieter K.; Lundmark, Linda; Nilsson, Robert O.; de la Barre, Suzanne; Granås, Brynhild; Kvidal-Røvik, Trine; Rantala, Outi; Tervo-Kankare, Kaarina; +1 more
    Publisher: Nordic Council of Ministers
    Country: Canada

    This report was originally published as: Jóhannesson, G.T., Welling, J., Müller, D.K., Lundmark, L., Nilsson, R.O., de la Barre, S., Granås, B., Kvidal-Røvik, T., Rantala, O., Tervo-Kankare,K., & Maher, P. (2022). Arctic tourism in times of change: Uncertain futures - from overtourism to re-starting tourism. Nordic Council of Ministers. DOI: 10.6027/temanord2022-516 This report presents the findings of the third and final workshop and field course hosted by the project Partnership for Sustainability: Arctic Tourism in Times of Change funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Arctic Co-operation Programme 2018–2021. The focus of the workshop was on overtourism and the impact of and response to COVID-19 by companies and stakeholders in Arctic tourism. This publication was funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25309/delaBarre2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dames, Shannon; Kryskow, Pamela; Watler, Crosbie;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Canada

    This article was originally published as: Dames, S., Kryskow, P., & Watler, C. (2022). A cohort-based case report: The impact of ketamine-assisted therapy embedded in a community of practice framework for healthcare providers with PTSD and depression. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.803279 Amid an international pandemic and a worsening mental health crisis, ketamine-assisted therapy is emerging as a promising solution for those deemed “treatment resistant.” Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are on the rise, with accelerating direct (e.g., burden of suffering) and indirect (e.g., disability/role impairment and impact on family) costs. Psychedelic-assisted therapies show significant promise in the treatment of a number of clinically challenging conditions, including depression, anxiety, PTSD, addiction, and end-of-life distress. Ketamine is currently the only safe, effective and legal widely available psychedelic-like medicine. To address the echo pandemic of health care provider distress, a multi-disciplinary team was charged with developing a ketamine-assisted psychotherapy program, delivered in a community of practice (CoP) group model and evaluated in a quality improvement framework. Program evaluation occurred through mixed methods. Quantitative mental health assessments included the PHQ-9 for depression, the PCL-5 for PTSD, GAD-7 for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and B-IPF for work/life functionality. Participant narrative feedback was collected to evaluate outcomes and for quality improvement purposes. Mean mental health scores were collected across three cohorts, totaling 94 patients. The mean aggregate scores of participants meeting the mental health assessment cut-off criteria (screening positive) were analyzed to assess clinical significance. Mean aggregate results comparing baseline vs. outcome measures (measured within 1–2 weeks after completion of the 12-week program) were clinically significant, demonstrating significant improvements in depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and work/life functionality. In summary, 91% saw improvements in generalized anxiety, 79% saw improvements in depression, 86% of those who screened positive for PTSD now screen negative, and 92% had significant life/work functionality improvements. Qualitative feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with several unsolicited self-reports of transformation. Participant and team feedback enables the program to continue improving with each iteration. Results speak to the effectiveness of ketamine for psychedelic-assisted therapy, supported by a CoP framework. Outcomes are relevant for mental health programming, education and healthcare policy. The project was supported by Vancouver Island University, a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Knowledge Synthesis grant, a British Columbia Ministry of Health COVID-19 Research grant, the Regional Initiatives Fund, in-kind support from Island Health, the British Columbia Nurses Union, First Nations Health Authority, and philanthropic funds. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. It was originally published as: Dames, S., Kryskow, P., & Watler, C. (2022). A cohort-based case report: The impact of ketamine-assisted therapy embedded in a community of practice framework for healthcare providers with PTSD and depression. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.803279 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25308/Dames2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wicks, Donna L.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Personalizing student learning holds significance in the new British Columbia curriculum. Teachers are expected to meet individual student needs while also providing them with flexibility and choice. This is a challenging task and one that teachers have been striving to achieve for years. With the onset of the Covid-19 Pandemic, distance learning suddenly became much more mainstream, as schools all over the world were forced to teach their students online. This was a real challenge for teachers who were not familiar with online teaching and for students and families who were used to learning face-to-face in a brick-and-mortar school. In order to meet future online learning as well as to personalize student needs, it is important that teachers begin to consider adding digital learning to their teaching skills. This project is designed to support teachers who wish to continue to work with some online learning opportunities to meet individual student requirements while still participating in the face-to-face learning needs of lower primary students. This project addresses the Critical Challenge Question: How can educators use Blended Learning to contribute to effective and individualized literacy programs in the lower primary classroom? I have created a website that will support teachers who want to continue to utilize or learn about the Station Rotation model of Blended Learning to personalize their students’ academic programs and to meet their students’ individual needs. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26129/Wicks.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Swan, Cheryl E.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    As online learning continues to grow in popularity and becomes increasingly necessary with the spread of Covid-19, it is crucial for educators to offer well-developed courses that meet the requirements of their learners. A well-designed online course can enhance learning and enable students of all needs and abilities to succeed. For the most part, Open Source, senior-level Mathematics courses that are found online today lack variety and motivating content. However, motivation is essential for a student's success as it guides their actions and fosters engagement. The literature shows that for learners of Mathematics to be successful, Mathematical self-efficacy and a positive mindset are necessary. The purpose of this Process Paper was to utilize existing research and technologies to address the Critical Challenge Question, 'How can a Learning Management System be utilized to create robust and interactive, fully-online secondary Math courses to increase student motivation and engagement?' A comprehensive Literature Review and utilization of Insturcture’s Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) has contributed to the creation of a fully online, asynchronous Pre-calculus 12 course based on British Columbia’s current curriculum. Using a modularized learning approach, the aim of creating this course was to provide Maple Leaf International School (MLIS) secondary students the opportunity to learn in a well-designed, accommodating, and flexible environment that offers a means to develop self-efficacy with regard to successful learning in Mathematics. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25699/Swan.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corea, Sonja;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    In March 2020, schools in British Columbia were closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The uncertainty of the whole situation was a traumatic event for both staff and students in BC schools. Even when staff and students returned to school, teachers had to learn a new way of connecting with their students and delivering curriculum. When schools reopened, educators had to address and ensure the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) needs of their students were being met. This pandemic increased anxiety and affected the mental health of staff and students in BC schools. Using a mixed method design, I explored the relationship between mental health and social emotional learning. Through an explanatory sequential approach, I utilized questionnaires followed by one-on-one interviews as my research tools. The purpose of this research was to gather data about the effects of COVID on the mental health of staff, students, and their families, and identify which SEL practices were most commonly used and found most effective during this time. The data triangulated between the questionnaires and the one-on-one interviews resulted in five main recommendations: increased mindfulness practices within the classroom and school, opportunities to connect with each other every day, additional exercise and time spent outdoors, and implementing strategies to prevent teacher burnout. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25741/Corea.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Schmid, Jeanette; Bradley, Holly;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    This research has aimed to identify the ways in which social service delivery in the mid-Island region of Vancouver Island has shifted because of COVID-19 conditions. Prompted by initial informal comments regarding the effect of the pandemic, we initiated an 18-month research process that checked in with representatives of social service agencies at six-month intervals. The study offers a local perspective that may have insights and lessons relevant to social service organizations elsewhere. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25255/SchmidBradley2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burns, Hayley;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Tourism has been affected on a global scale due to the novel coronavirus. Governments of all levels are trying to navigate how to move forward with the tourism industry in order to support best practices whilst addressing challenges that hinder economic prosperity, such as social distancing and border closures. This work focuses on identifying the local government planning and tourism resilience practices that are being put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, establishing the role of the local government planner in tourism resilience planning practices. Research was first acquired through a literature review and providing the Vancouver Island context. Additionally, four information interviews were conducted with destination management organization professionals and community planners on Vancouver Island. Lastly, a survey was sent out to local government planners on Vancouver Island in order to reach a larger scope of participants. Concluding this thesis are a set of recommendations rooted in local government jurisdiction for the planning profession, moving forward. Thesis/major project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Community Planning in the Department of Community Planning, Faculty of Social Sciences. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24390/BurnsThesis.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holland, Mark;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In this paper, urban planner, development consultant and educator, Mark Holland, outlines a rethinking of urban structure that will be supercharged as we learn from the impacts of COVID 19 on our cities. The modern city region has been focused on building high density downtowns and peripheral town centres, based on assumptions that are now out of date as a basis for regional planning. COVID 19 closed our downtowns and we now need to reinvent our urban and regional patterns in light of what we have (re)discovered from our pandemic response. Restructuring our economy, social patterns, food systems and regional growth patterns into a network of high-street-based corridors will not only make us more resilient to shocks like COVID 19, but overall create a much healthier, sustainable, and economically viable region. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23638/HollandFP2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ehren, M.C.M.; Madrid, R.; Romiti, Sara; Armstrong, P.W.; Fisher, P.; McWhorter, D.L.;
    Countries: Canada, Netherlands, United Kingdom, United Kingdom

    The school closures necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic created a rapid shift to alternative modes of educational delivery, primarily online learning and teacher-supported home-schooling. This shift has revealed deep inequities in education systems worldwide, as many children lost access to teachers and schooling. An effective response to these changes has tested teachers’ personal capacities and individual and collective agency intensely. The research lab we report on within this paper aimed to develop a better understanding of teacher agency in meeting the challenges of the pandemic and the physical and relational enablers and constraints of their environment. Drawing on case study reports from six international contexts and a series of online discussions with research lab participants, this study explores teachers’ enactment of agency in the context of various circumstances and environments. The authors argue that it is imperative that education systems support the enhancement of teachers’ personal and collective agency in the face of continued disruption to schooling and ongoing challenges to educational equity. This is an electronic copy of an article that was originally published as: Ehren, M.C.M., Madrid, R., Romiti, S., Armstrong, P.W., Fisher, P., & McWhorter, D.L. (2021). Teaching in the COVID-19 era: Understanding the opportunities and barriers for teacher agency. Perspectives in Education, 39(1), 61-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.18820/2519593S/pie.v39.i1.5 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24447/Fisherpdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    Foreword / Pam Shaw -- Editorial / Liang (Cliff) Feng -- How 'smart' are smart cities? The case of Sidewalk Labs, Toronto / Don Alexander -- Generation urban: Financing family-friendly housing in Canada's urban centres / Kristin N. Agnello -- Corridor urbanism and the rise of the neighbourhood in the post-COVID city / Mark Holland In this issue, you will find considerations on smart cities as a way to promote critical thinking of planning students, a deep dive into the development proformas of housing units at urban cores, and detailed discussions on corridor urbanism as we learn from the impacts of COVID-19. Foreword / Pam Shaw -- Editorial / Liang (Cliff) Feng -- How 'smart' are smart cities? The case of Sidewalk Labs, Toronto / Don Alexander -- Generation urban: Financing family-friendly housing in Canada's urban centres / Kristin N. Agnello -- Corridor urbanism and the rise of the neighbourhood in the post-COVID city / Mark Holland https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23603/FuturePlansMarch2021.pdf?sequence=3