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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
26 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • 2019-2023
  • CA
  • English
  • VIUSpace
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dick, Brian;
    Publisher: American Society of Engineering Education
    Country: Canada

    Conference paper: 2022 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. Conference dates: June 26 - 29, 2022. Location: Minneapolis, MN. © 2022 American Society for Engineering Education. This paper was originally published as: Dick, B. (2022). Long-term impact of COVID-19 on the first-year engineering experience at a mid-sized teaching focused university [Paper presentation]. 2022 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Minneapolis, MN. https://peer.asee.org/41352 This paper discusses the COVID-19 adaptions made within the first-year engineering design curriculum, and reflects on their impact fulfilling the required learning outcomes, mitigating student mental health issues, and addressing academic misconduct. It will further articulate the adaptations that are planned to be continued within the first-year experience as students return for face-to-face instruction. The impact of these changes will continue to be studied over the coming academic year. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26179/DickASEE2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór; Welling, Johannes; Müller, Dieter K.; Lundmark, Linda; Nilsson, Robert O.; de la Barre, Suzanne; Granås, Brynhild; Kvidal-Røvik, Trine; Rantala, Outi; Tervo-Kankare, Kaarina; +1 more
    Publisher: Nordic Council of Ministers
    Country: Canada

    This report was originally published as: Jóhannesson, G.T., Welling, J., Müller, D.K., Lundmark, L., Nilsson, R.O., de la Barre, S., Granås, B., Kvidal-Røvik, T., Rantala, O., Tervo-Kankare,K., & Maher, P. (2022). Arctic tourism in times of change: Uncertain futures - from overtourism to re-starting tourism. Nordic Council of Ministers. DOI: 10.6027/temanord2022-516 This report presents the findings of the third and final workshop and field course hosted by the project Partnership for Sustainability: Arctic Tourism in Times of Change funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Arctic Co-operation Programme 2018–2021. The focus of the workshop was on overtourism and the impact of and response to COVID-19 by companies and stakeholders in Arctic tourism. This publication was funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25309/delaBarre2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Riedel, Marian; Moll, Rachel; Taplay, Alison; Fisher, Paige;
    Publisher: Canadian Association for Teacher Education
    Country: Canada

    This book chapter was originally published as: Riedel, M., Moll, R, Taplay, A., & Fisher, P. (2022). Fostering K-12 student-teacher and collegial relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic: Implications for teacher education. In M. Jacobesen & C. Smith (Eds.). Online learning and teaching from Kindergarten to graduate school (pp. 57-86). Canadian Association for Teacher Education. http://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/40509 This community-based participatory action research project was prompted by the rapid shift to emergency remote learning in March-June 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. A team of researchers at a regional teaching-focused university in BC initiated the research based on their shared belief that new understandings about the relational character of teaching and learning would come from an examination of the lived experience of educators during this difficult time. The study involved six community partners who collaborated with the researchers to co-develop the research questions and co-design data collection tools. The study was intended to be mutually beneficial for the teacher education program and the school districts/schools involved. It engaged 413 participants (teachers, administrators, educational assistants [EAs], and non-enrolling teachers) who answered survey questions about relationships, communication, equity and inclusion, shifts in practice, and leadership. This chapter is focused on data specific to the role of relationships in education and how relationships were impacted during the pandemic. Three themes emerged from the data analysis relevant to online learning environments, yet applicable across all modalities: relationality as a core value of BC K-12 educators, affordances and challenges for relationships, and affordances and challenges for equity. Recommendations specific to teacher education aim to advise teacher education programs to expand their focus on relationship building; to re-envision the work of teaching as a collaborative and not a solitary act; and to advocate for the inclusion of online teaching and learning pedagogies into teacher education programs. The copyright for each piece in this collection stays with the respective author(s). The authors assign a non-exclusive right to publication to the Canadian Association for Teacher Education and a non-exclusive license to educational and non-profit institutions and to individuals to use their piece in this publication for personal use and in courses of instruction provided that the pieces are used in full and this copyright statement is reproduced. Any usage is prohibited without the expressed permission of the author. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26468/RiedelEtAlCATEChapter.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corea, Sonja;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    In March 2020, schools in British Columbia were closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The uncertainty of the whole situation was a traumatic event for both staff and students in BC schools. Even when staff and students returned to school, teachers had to learn a new way of connecting with their students and delivering curriculum. When schools reopened, educators had to address and ensure the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) needs of their students were being met. This pandemic increased anxiety and affected the mental health of staff and students in BC schools. Using a mixed method design, I explored the relationship between mental health and social emotional learning. Through an explanatory sequential approach, I utilized questionnaires followed by one-on-one interviews as my research tools. The purpose of this research was to gather data about the effects of COVID on the mental health of staff, students, and their families, and identify which SEL practices were most commonly used and found most effective during this time. The data triangulated between the questionnaires and the one-on-one interviews resulted in five main recommendations: increased mindfulness practices within the classroom and school, opportunities to connect with each other every day, additional exercise and time spent outdoors, and implementing strategies to prevent teacher burnout. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25741/Corea.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wicks, Donna L.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Personalizing student learning holds significance in the new British Columbia curriculum. Teachers are expected to meet individual student needs while also providing them with flexibility and choice. This is a challenging task and one that teachers have been striving to achieve for years. With the onset of the Covid-19 Pandemic, distance learning suddenly became much more mainstream, as schools all over the world were forced to teach their students online. This was a real challenge for teachers who were not familiar with online teaching and for students and families who were used to learning face-to-face in a brick-and-mortar school. In order to meet future online learning as well as to personalize student needs, it is important that teachers begin to consider adding digital learning to their teaching skills. This project is designed to support teachers who wish to continue to work with some online learning opportunities to meet individual student requirements while still participating in the face-to-face learning needs of lower primary students. This project addresses the Critical Challenge Question: How can educators use Blended Learning to contribute to effective and individualized literacy programs in the lower primary classroom? I have created a website that will support teachers who want to continue to utilize or learn about the Station Rotation model of Blended Learning to personalize their students’ academic programs and to meet their students’ individual needs. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26129/Wicks.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Swan, Cheryl E.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    As online learning continues to grow in popularity and becomes increasingly necessary with the spread of Covid-19, it is crucial for educators to offer well-developed courses that meet the requirements of their learners. A well-designed online course can enhance learning and enable students of all needs and abilities to succeed. For the most part, Open Source, senior-level Mathematics courses that are found online today lack variety and motivating content. However, motivation is essential for a student's success as it guides their actions and fosters engagement. The literature shows that for learners of Mathematics to be successful, Mathematical self-efficacy and a positive mindset are necessary. The purpose of this Process Paper was to utilize existing research and technologies to address the Critical Challenge Question, 'How can a Learning Management System be utilized to create robust and interactive, fully-online secondary Math courses to increase student motivation and engagement?' A comprehensive Literature Review and utilization of Insturcture’s Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) has contributed to the creation of a fully online, asynchronous Pre-calculus 12 course based on British Columbia’s current curriculum. Using a modularized learning approach, the aim of creating this course was to provide Maple Leaf International School (MLIS) secondary students the opportunity to learn in a well-designed, accommodating, and flexible environment that offers a means to develop self-efficacy with regard to successful learning in Mathematics. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25699/Swan.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Schmid, Jeanette; Bradley, Holly;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    This research has aimed to identify the ways in which social service delivery in the mid-Island region of Vancouver Island has shifted because of COVID-19 conditions. Prompted by initial informal comments regarding the effect of the pandemic, we initiated an 18-month research process that checked in with representatives of social service agencies at six-month intervals. The study offers a local perspective that may have insights and lessons relevant to social service organizations elsewhere. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25255/SchmidBradley2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Publication . Conference object . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dick, Brian;
    Publisher: American Society of Engineering Education
    Country: Canada

    Conference paper: 2021 First-Year Engineering Experience. Virtual conference dates: August 9 - 10, 2021. © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. This paper was originally published as: Dick, B. (2021). Enabling hands-on, team-based project work during COVID-19 [Paper presentation]. 2021 First-Year Engineering Experience Conference. https://peer.asee.org/38378 COVID-19 has impacted delivery of the first-year engineering design curriculum throughout the post-secondary system. At Vancouver Island University (VIU), instruction of the first-year curriculum shifted to an entirely remote learning environment where students were not expected to be in physical contact at any point during the term. This presented a significant challenge to delivering its learning outcomes and activities, particularly hands-on, team-based project work. At VIU, students typically complete a cornerstone design project in the second term of their firstyear of studies. Due to COVID-19, this project was modified to allow for completion within a virtual learning environment. Teams of three or four students were tasked to cooperatively create a rolling ball structure, built in isolation, but delivered and assembled at the University campus by the course instructor and its technician. This structure was required to form a path for a rolling ball, and interact with its neighbouring structures to create seamless track. Collectively, all team structures (a total of ten) formed a ring allowing for continuous ball movement once started. These pass-off points between each structure were determined collaboratively between both teams and individuals. This paper describes how a team-based cornerstone project experience was managed, and its impact on the student experience. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26194/DickASEE35475.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Canadian Institute of Planners
    Country: Canada

    Digging deeper to meet the needs of our aging population|Creuser davantage pour répondre aux besoins de notre population vieillissante / Samantha Biglieri & Glenn Miller -- Understanding the diversity of Canadian seniors / Doug Norris -- Older Indigenous people, health, and planning in Canada: Considering ethical space / Sarah E. Nelson -- What can planners do to help seniors age in place? / Arlene Etchen -- The case for visitability / Amina Menkad & Joanna Ilunga-Kapinga -- COVID-19 and the forgotten densities of long-term care / Julian Iacobelli, Samantha Biglieri, Lorenzo de Vidovich, & Roger Keil -- Après la zone scolaire, pourquoi pas la « zone santé » pour un vieillissement actif ? / Mikael St-Pierre, Simon Chouinard-Laliberté, & Audrey Lise Mallet -- Breaking up with cars is hard to do / Krista Macaulay -- Nested aging: Lifecycles in the vertical city / Maxwell Hartt, Brian Webb, & James T. White -- Innovative, intergenerational housing empowers women / Carla Guerrera -- Affordability: A key component of accessibility / Amanda McCulley -- Gerald Hodge: FCIP/FICU 1931 - 2017 / Glenn Miller -- The cautionary tale that is Canada's experience with long-term care|L’expérience canadienne en matière de soins de longue durée : une leçon à retenir / Gordon Harris -- Planning research digest|Condensé de recherches en urbanisme -- Planner's bookshelf|L’étagère du planifi cateur Our aging population: Challenges and opportunities|Notre population vieillissante : défis et opportunités Digging deeper to meet the needs of our aging population|Creuser davantage pour répondre aux besoins de notre population vieillissante / Samantha Biglieri & Glenn Miller -- Understanding the diversity of Canadian seniors / Doug Norris -- Older Indigenous people, health, and planning in Canada: Considering ethical space / Sarah E. Nelson -- What can planners do to help seniors age in place? / Arlene Etchen -- The case for visitability / Amina Menkad & Joanna Ilunga-Kapinga -- COVID-19 and the forgotten densities of long-term care / Julian Iacobelli, Samantha Biglieri, Lorenzo de Vidovich, & Roger Keil -- Après la zone scolaire, pourquoi pas la « zone santé » pour un vieillissement actif ? / Mikael St-Pierre, Simon Chouinard-Laliberté, & Audrey Lise Mallet -- Breaking up with cars is hard to do / Krista Macaulay -- Nested aging: Lifecycles in the vertical city / Maxwell Hartt, Brian Webb, & James T. White -- Innovative, intergenerational housing empowers women / Carla Guerrera -- Affordability: A key component of accessibility / Amanda McCulley -- Gerald Hodge: FCIP/FICU 1931 - 2017 / Glenn Miller -- The cautionary tale that is Canada's experience with long-term care|L’expérience canadienne en matière de soins de longue durée : une leçon à retenir / Gordon Harris -- Planning research digest|Condensé de recherches en urbanisme -- Planner's bookshelf|L’étagère du planifi cateur https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26301/PlanCanada_Vol.61_No.2_Summer-2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burns, Hayley;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Tourism has been affected on a global scale due to the novel coronavirus. Governments of all levels are trying to navigate how to move forward with the tourism industry in order to support best practices whilst addressing challenges that hinder economic prosperity, such as social distancing and border closures. This work focuses on identifying the local government planning and tourism resilience practices that are being put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, establishing the role of the local government planner in tourism resilience planning practices. Research was first acquired through a literature review and providing the Vancouver Island context. Additionally, four information interviews were conducted with destination management organization professionals and community planners on Vancouver Island. Lastly, a survey was sent out to local government planners on Vancouver Island in order to reach a larger scope of participants. Concluding this thesis are a set of recommendations rooted in local government jurisdiction for the planning profession, moving forward. Thesis/major project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Community Planning in the Department of Community Planning, Faculty of Social Sciences. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24390/BurnsThesis.pdf?sequence=3

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
26 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dick, Brian;
    Publisher: American Society of Engineering Education
    Country: Canada

    Conference paper: 2022 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. Conference dates: June 26 - 29, 2022. Location: Minneapolis, MN. © 2022 American Society for Engineering Education. This paper was originally published as: Dick, B. (2022). Long-term impact of COVID-19 on the first-year engineering experience at a mid-sized teaching focused university [Paper presentation]. 2022 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Minneapolis, MN. https://peer.asee.org/41352 This paper discusses the COVID-19 adaptions made within the first-year engineering design curriculum, and reflects on their impact fulfilling the required learning outcomes, mitigating student mental health issues, and addressing academic misconduct. It will further articulate the adaptations that are planned to be continued within the first-year experience as students return for face-to-face instruction. The impact of these changes will continue to be studied over the coming academic year. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26179/DickASEE2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór; Welling, Johannes; Müller, Dieter K.; Lundmark, Linda; Nilsson, Robert O.; de la Barre, Suzanne; Granås, Brynhild; Kvidal-Røvik, Trine; Rantala, Outi; Tervo-Kankare, Kaarina; +1 more
    Publisher: Nordic Council of Ministers
    Country: Canada

    This report was originally published as: Jóhannesson, G.T., Welling, J., Müller, D.K., Lundmark, L., Nilsson, R.O., de la Barre, S., Granås, B., Kvidal-Røvik, T., Rantala, O., Tervo-Kankare,K., & Maher, P. (2022). Arctic tourism in times of change: Uncertain futures - from overtourism to re-starting tourism. Nordic Council of Ministers. DOI: 10.6027/temanord2022-516 This report presents the findings of the third and final workshop and field course hosted by the project Partnership for Sustainability: Arctic Tourism in Times of Change funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Arctic Co-operation Programme 2018–2021. The focus of the workshop was on overtourism and the impact of and response to COVID-19 by companies and stakeholders in Arctic tourism. This publication was funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25309/delaBarre2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Riedel, Marian; Moll, Rachel; Taplay, Alison; Fisher, Paige;
    Publisher: Canadian Association for Teacher Education
    Country: Canada

    This book chapter was originally published as: Riedel, M., Moll, R, Taplay, A., & Fisher, P. (2022). Fostering K-12 student-teacher and collegial relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic: Implications for teacher education. In M. Jacobesen & C. Smith (Eds.). Online learning and teaching from Kindergarten to graduate school (pp. 57-86). Canadian Association for Teacher Education. http://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/40509 This community-based participatory action research project was prompted by the rapid shift to emergency remote learning in March-June 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. A team of researchers at a regional teaching-focused university in BC initiated the research based on their shared belief that new understandings about the relational character of teaching and learning would come from an examination of the lived experience of educators during this difficult time. The study involved six community partners who collaborated with the researchers to co-develop the research questions and co-design data collection tools. The study was intended to be mutually beneficial for the teacher education program and the school districts/schools involved. It engaged 413 participants (teachers, administrators, educational assistants [EAs], and non-enrolling teachers) who answered survey questions about relationships, communication, equity and inclusion, shifts in practice, and leadership. This chapter is focused on data specific to the role of relationships in education and how relationships were impacted during the pandemic. Three themes emerged from the data analysis relevant to online learning environments, yet applicable across all modalities: relationality as a core value of BC K-12 educators, affordances and challenges for relationships, and affordances and challenges for equity. Recommendations specific to teacher education aim to advise teacher education programs to expand their focus on relationship building; to re-envision the work of teaching as a collaborative and not a solitary act; and to advocate for the inclusion of online teaching and learning pedagogies into teacher education programs. The copyright for each piece in this collection stays with the respective author(s). The authors assign a non-exclusive right to publication to the Canadian Association for Teacher Education and a non-exclusive license to educational and non-profit institutions and to individuals to use their piece in this publication for personal use and in courses of instruction provided that the pieces are used in full and this copyright statement is reproduced. Any usage is prohibited without the expressed permission of the author. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26468/RiedelEtAlCATEChapter.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corea, Sonja;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    In March 2020, schools in British Columbia were closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The uncertainty of the whole situation was a traumatic event for both staff and students in BC schools. Even when staff and students returned to school, teachers had to learn a new way of connecting with their students and delivering curriculum. When schools reopened, educators had to address and ensure the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) needs of their students were being met. This pandemic increased anxiety and affected the mental health of staff and students in BC schools. Using a mixed method design, I explored the relationship between mental health and social emotional learning. Through an explanatory sequential approach, I utilized questionnaires followed by one-on-one interviews as my research tools. The purpose of this research was to gather data about the effects of COVID on the mental health of staff, students, and their families, and identify which SEL practices were most commonly used and found most effective during this time. The data triangulated between the questionnaires and the one-on-one interviews resulted in five main recommendations: increased mindfulness practices within the classroom and school, opportunities to connect with each other every day, additional exercise and time spent outdoors, and implementing strategies to prevent teacher burnout. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25741/Corea.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wicks, Donna L.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Personalizing student learning holds significance in the new British Columbia curriculum. Teachers are expected to meet individual student needs while also providing them with flexibility and choice. This is a challenging task and one that teachers have been striving to achieve for years. With the onset of the Covid-19 Pandemic, distance learning suddenly became much more mainstream, as schools all over the world were forced to teach their students online. This was a real challenge for teachers who were not familiar with online teaching and for students and families who were used to learning face-to-face in a brick-and-mortar school. In order to meet future online learning as well as to personalize student needs, it is important that teachers begin to consider adding digital learning to their teaching skills. This project is designed to support teachers who wish to continue to work with some online learning opportunities to meet individual student requirements while still participating in the face-to-face learning needs of lower primary students. This project addresses the Critical Challenge Question: How can educators use Blended Learning to contribute to effective and individualized literacy programs in the lower primary classroom? I have created a website that will support teachers who want to continue to utilize or learn about the Station Rotation model of Blended Learning to personalize their students’ academic programs and to meet their students’ individual needs. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26129/Wicks.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Swan, Cheryl E.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    As online learning continues to grow in popularity and becomes increasingly necessary with the spread of Covid-19, it is crucial for educators to offer well-developed courses that meet the requirements of their learners. A well-designed online course can enhance learning and enable students of all needs and abilities to succeed. For the most part, Open Source, senior-level Mathematics courses that are found online today lack variety and motivating content. However, motivation is essential for a student's success as it guides their actions and fosters engagement. The literature shows that for learners of Mathematics to be successful, Mathematical self-efficacy and a positive mindset are necessary. The purpose of this Process Paper was to utilize existing research and technologies to address the Critical Challenge Question, 'How can a Learning Management System be utilized to create robust and interactive, fully-online secondary Math courses to increase student motivation and engagement?' A comprehensive Literature Review and utilization of Insturcture’s Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) has contributed to the creation of a fully online, asynchronous Pre-calculus 12 course based on British Columbia’s current curriculum. Using a modularized learning approach, the aim of creating this course was to provide Maple Leaf International School (MLIS) secondary students the opportunity to learn in a well-designed, accommodating, and flexible environment that offers a means to develop self-efficacy with regard to successful learning in Mathematics. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25699/Swan.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Schmid, Jeanette; Bradley, Holly;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    This research has aimed to identify the ways in which social service delivery in the mid-Island region of Vancouver Island has shifted because of COVID-19 conditions. Prompted by initial informal comments regarding the effect of the pandemic, we initiated an 18-month research process that checked in with representatives of social service agencies at six-month intervals. The study offers a local perspective that may have insights and lessons relevant to social service organizations elsewhere. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25255/SchmidBradley2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Publication . Conference object . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dick, Brian;
    Publisher: American Society of Engineering Education
    Country: Canada

    Conference paper: 2021 First-Year Engineering Experience. Virtual conference dates: August 9 - 10, 2021. © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. This paper was originally published as: Dick, B. (2021). Enabling hands-on, team-based project work during COVID-19 [Paper presentation]. 2021 First-Year Engineering Experience Conference. https://peer.asee.org/38378 COVID-19 has impacted delivery of the first-year engineering design curriculum throughout the post-secondary system. At Vancouver Island University (VIU), instruction of the first-year curriculum shifted to an entirely remote learning environment where students were not expected to be in physical contact at any point during the term. This presented a significant challenge to delivering its learning outcomes and activities, particularly hands-on, team-based project work. At VIU, students typically complete a cornerstone design project in the second term of their firstyear of studies. Due to COVID-19, this project was modified to allow for completion within a virtual learning environment. Teams of three or four students were tasked to cooperatively create a rolling ball structure, built in isolation, but delivered and assembled at the University campus by the course instructor and its technician. This structure was required to form a path for a rolling ball, and interact with its neighbouring structures to create seamless track. Collectively, all team structures (a total of ten) formed a ring allowing for continuous ball movement once started. These pass-off points between each structure were determined collaboratively between both teams and individuals. This paper describes how a team-based cornerstone project experience was managed, and its impact on the student experience. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26194/DickASEE35475.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Canadian Institute of Planners
    Country: Canada

    Digging deeper to meet the needs of our aging population|Creuser davantage pour répondre aux besoins de notre population vieillissante / Samantha Biglieri & Glenn Miller -- Understanding the diversity of Canadian seniors / Doug Norris -- Older Indigenous people, health, and planning in Canada: Considering ethical space / Sarah E. Nelson -- What can planners do to help seniors age in place? / Arlene Etchen -- The case for visitability / Amina Menkad & Joanna Ilunga-Kapinga -- COVID-19 and the forgotten densities of long-term care / Julian Iacobelli, Samantha Biglieri, Lorenzo de Vidovich, & Roger Keil -- Après la zone scolaire, pourquoi pas la « zone santé » pour un vieillissement actif ? / Mikael St-Pierre, Simon Chouinard-Laliberté, & Audrey Lise Mallet -- Breaking up with cars is hard to do / Krista Macaulay -- Nested aging: Lifecycles in the vertical city / Maxwell Hartt, Brian Webb, & James T. White -- Innovative, intergenerational housing empowers women / Carla Guerrera -- Affordability: A key component of accessibility / Amanda McCulley -- Gerald Hodge: FCIP/FICU 1931 - 2017 / Glenn Miller -- The cautionary tale that is Canada's experience with long-term care|L’expérience canadienne en matière de soins de longue durée : une leçon à retenir / Gordon Harris -- Planning research digest|Condensé de recherches en urbanisme -- Planner's bookshelf|L’étagère du planifi cateur Our aging population: Challenges and opportunities|Notre population vieillissante : défis et opportunités Digging deeper to meet the needs of our aging population|Creuser davantage pour répondre aux besoins de notre population vieillissante / Samantha Biglieri & Glenn Miller -- Understanding the diversity of Canadian seniors / Doug Norris -- Older Indigenous people, health, and planning in Canada: Considering ethical space / Sarah E. Nelson -- What can planners do to help seniors age in place? / Arlene Etchen -- The case for visitability / Amina Menkad & Joanna Ilunga-Kapinga -- COVID-19 and the forgotten densities of long-term care / Julian Iacobelli, Samantha Biglieri, Lorenzo de Vidovich, & Roger Keil -- Après la zone scolaire, pourquoi pas la « zone santé » pour un vieillissement actif ? / Mikael St-Pierre, Simon Chouinard-Laliberté, & Audrey Lise Mallet -- Breaking up with cars is hard to do / Krista Macaulay -- Nested aging: Lifecycles in the vertical city / Maxwell Hartt, Brian Webb, & James T. White -- Innovative, intergenerational housing empowers women / Carla Guerrera -- Affordability: A key component of accessibility / Amanda McCulley -- Gerald Hodge: FCIP/FICU 1931 - 2017 / Glenn Miller -- The cautionary tale that is Canada's experience with long-term care|L’expérience canadienne en matière de soins de longue durée : une leçon à retenir / Gordon Harris -- Planning research digest|Condensé de recherches en urbanisme -- Planner's bookshelf|L’étagère du planifi cateur https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26301/PlanCanada_Vol.61_No.2_Summer-2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burns, Hayley;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Tourism has been affected on a global scale due to the novel coronavirus. Governments of all levels are trying to navigate how to move forward with the tourism industry in order to support best practices whilst addressing challenges that hinder economic prosperity, such as social distancing and border closures. This work focuses on identifying the local government planning and tourism resilience practices that are being put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, establishing the role of the local government planner in tourism resilience planning practices. Research was first acquired through a literature review and providing the Vancouver Island context. Additionally, four information interviews were conducted with destination management organization professionals and community planners on Vancouver Island. Lastly, a survey was sent out to local government planners on Vancouver Island in order to reach a larger scope of participants. Concluding this thesis are a set of recommendations rooted in local government jurisdiction for the planning profession, moving forward. Thesis/major project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Community Planning in the Department of Community Planning, Faculty of Social Sciences. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24390/BurnsThesis.pdf?sequence=3