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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
27 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • COVID-19
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  • Research software
  • 2018-2022
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  • CA
  • CHEST Journal

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  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nisha Andany; Nick Daneman;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Valerie G. Press; Andrea S. Gershon; Frank C. Sciurba; Denitza P. Blagev;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lisa Burry; Jeffrey F. Barletta; David Williamson; Salmaan Kanji; Ryan C. Maves; Jeffrey R. Dichter; Michael D. Christian; James A. Geiling; Brian L. Erstad;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Critical drug shortages have been widely documented during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, particularly for IV sedatives used to facilitate mechanical ventilation. Surges in volume of patients requiring mechanical ventilation coupled with prolonged ventilator days and the high sedative dosing requirements observed quickly led to the depletion of "just-in-time" inventories typically maintained by institutions. This manuscript describes drug shortages in the context of global, manufacturing, regional and institutional perspectives in times of a worldwide crisis such as a pandemic. We describe etiologic factors that lead to drug shortages including issues related to supply (eg, manufacturing difficulties, supply chain breakdowns) and variables that influence demand (eg, volatile prescribing practices, anecdotal or low-level data, hoarding). In addition, we describe methods to mitigate drug shortages as well as conservation strategies for sedatives, analgesics and neuromuscular blockers that could readily be applied at the bedside. The COVID-19 pandemic has accentuated the need for a coordinated, multi-pronged approach to optimize medication availability as individual or unilateral efforts are unlikely to be successful.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marco Confalonieri; Francesco Salton; Paola Confalonieri; Bram Rochwerg; G. Umberto Meduri;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gianfranco Umberto Meduri; Bram Rochwerg;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mohit Sodhi; Mahyar Etminan;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Najib T. Ayas; Kristin Fraser; Eleni Giannouli; Patrick J. Hanly; Tetyana Kendzerska; Sherri L. Katz; Brandy N. Lachmann; Annie C. Lajoie; Caroline Minville; Debra Morrison; +4 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: CIHR
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ryan C. Maves; James Downar; Jeffrey R. Dichter; John L. Hick; Asha V. Devereaux; James A. Geiling; Niranjan Kissoon; Nathaniel Hupert; Alexander S. Niven; Mary A. King; +13 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Public health emergencies have the potential to place enormous strain on health systems. The current pandemic of the novel 2019 coronavirus disease has required hospitals in numerous countries to expand their surge capacity to meet the needs of patients with critical illness. When even surge capacity is exceeded, however, principles of critical care triage may be needed as a means to allocate scarce resources, such as mechanical ventilators or key medications. The goal of a triage system is to direct limited resources towards patients most likely to benefit from them. Implementing a triage system requires careful coordination between clinicians, health systems, local and regional governments, and the public, with a goal of transparency to maintain trust. We discuss the principles of tertiary triage and methods for implementing such a system, emphasizing that these systems should serve only as a last resort. Even under triage, we must uphold our obligation to care for all patients as best possible under difficult circumstances.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kirsten M. Fiest; Karla D. Krewulak;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew Kouri; Samir Gupta; Azadeh Yadollahi; Clodagh M. Ryan; Andrea S. Gershon; Teresa To; Susan M. Tarlo; Roger S. Goldstein; Kenneth R. Chapman; Chung-Wai Chow;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    To reduce the spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, many pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories have been closed or have significantly reduced their testing capacity. Because these mitigation strategies may be necessary for the next 6 to 18 months to prevent recurrent peaks in disease prevalence, fewer objective measurements of lung function will alter the diagnosis and care of patients with chronic respiratory diseases. PFT, which includes spirometry, lung volume, and diffusion capacity measurement, is essential to the diagnosis and management of patients with asthma, COPD, and other chronic lung conditions. Both traditional and innovative alternatives to conventional testing must now be explored. These may include peak expiratory flow devices, electronic portable spirometers, portable exhaled nitric oxide measurement, airwave oscillometry devices, and novel digital health tools such as smartphone microphone spirometers and mobile health technologies along with integration of machine learning approaches. The adoption of some novel approaches may not merely replace but could improve existing management strategies and alter common diagnostic paradigms. With these options comes important technical, privacy, ethical, financial, and medicolegal barriers that must be addressed. However, the coronavirus disease 19 pandemic also presents a unique opportunity to augment conventional testing by including innovative and emerging approaches to measuring lung function remotely in patients with respiratory disease. The benefits of such an approach have the potential to enhance respiratory care and empower patient self-management well beyond the current global pandemic.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
27 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nisha Andany; Nick Daneman;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Valerie G. Press; Andrea S. Gershon; Frank C. Sciurba; Denitza P. Blagev;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lisa Burry; Jeffrey F. Barletta; David Williamson; Salmaan Kanji; Ryan C. Maves; Jeffrey R. Dichter; Michael D. Christian; James A. Geiling; Brian L. Erstad;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Critical drug shortages have been widely documented during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, particularly for IV sedatives used to facilitate mechanical ventilation. Surges in volume of patients requiring mechanical ventilation coupled with prolonged ventilator days and the high sedative dosing requirements observed quickly led to the depletion of "just-in-time" inventories typically maintained by institutions. This manuscript describes drug shortages in the context of global, manufacturing, regional and institutional perspectives in times of a worldwide crisis such as a pandemic. We describe etiologic factors that lead to drug shortages including issues related to supply (eg, manufacturing difficulties, supply chain breakdowns) and variables that influence demand (eg, volatile prescribing practices, anecdotal or low-level data, hoarding). In addition, we describe methods to mitigate drug shortages as well as conservation strategies for sedatives, analgesics and neuromuscular blockers that could readily be applied at the bedside. The COVID-19 pandemic has accentuated the need for a coordinated, multi-pronged approach to optimize medication availability as individual or unilateral efforts are unlikely to be successful.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marco Confalonieri; Francesco Salton; Paola Confalonieri; Bram Rochwerg; G. Umberto Meduri;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gianfranco Umberto Meduri; Bram Rochwerg;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mohit Sodhi; Mahyar Etminan;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Najib T. Ayas; Kristin Fraser; Eleni Giannouli; Patrick J. Hanly; Tetyana Kendzerska; Sherri L. Katz; Brandy N. Lachmann; Annie C. Lajoie; Caroline Minville; Debra Morrison; +4 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: CIHR
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ryan C. Maves; James Downar; Jeffrey R. Dichter; John L. Hick; Asha V. Devereaux; James A. Geiling; Niranjan Kissoon; Nathaniel Hupert; Alexander S. Niven; Mary A. King; +13 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Public health emergencies have the potential to place enormous strain on health systems. The current pandemic of the novel 2019 coronavirus disease has required hospitals in numerous countries to expand their surge capacity to meet the needs of patients with critical illness. When even surge capacity is exceeded, however, principles of critical care triage may be needed as a means to allocate scarce resources, such as mechanical ventilators or key medications. The goal of a triage system is to direct limited resources towards patients most likely to benefit from them. Implementing a triage system requires careful coordination between clinicians, health systems, local and regional governments, and the public, with a goal of transparency to maintain trust. We discuss the principles of tertiary triage and methods for implementing such a system, emphasizing that these systems should serve only as a last resort. Even under triage, we must uphold our obligation to care for all patients as best possible under difficult circumstances.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kirsten M. Fiest; Karla D. Krewulak;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew Kouri; Samir Gupta; Azadeh Yadollahi; Clodagh M. Ryan; Andrea S. Gershon; Teresa To; Susan M. Tarlo; Roger S. Goldstein; Kenneth R. Chapman; Chung-Wai Chow;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    To reduce the spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, many pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories have been closed or have significantly reduced their testing capacity. Because these mitigation strategies may be necessary for the next 6 to 18 months to prevent recurrent peaks in disease prevalence, fewer objective measurements of lung function will alter the diagnosis and care of patients with chronic respiratory diseases. PFT, which includes spirometry, lung volume, and diffusion capacity measurement, is essential to the diagnosis and management of patients with asthma, COPD, and other chronic lung conditions. Both traditional and innovative alternatives to conventional testing must now be explored. These may include peak expiratory flow devices, electronic portable spirometers, portable exhaled nitric oxide measurement, airwave oscillometry devices, and novel digital health tools such as smartphone microphone spirometers and mobile health technologies along with integration of machine learning approaches. The adoption of some novel approaches may not merely replace but could improve existing management strategies and alter common diagnostic paradigms. With these options comes important technical, privacy, ethical, financial, and medicolegal barriers that must be addressed. However, the coronavirus disease 19 pandemic also presents a unique opportunity to augment conventional testing by including innovative and emerging approaches to measuring lung function remotely in patients with respiratory disease. The benefits of such an approach have the potential to enhance respiratory care and empower patient self-management well beyond the current global pandemic.