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255 Research products, page 1 of 26

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tomer Illouz; Arya Biragyn; Milana Frenkel-Morgenstern; Orly Weissberg; Alessandro Gorohovski; Eugene Merzon; Ilan Green; Florencia Iulita; Lisi Flores-Aguilar; Mara Dierssen; +14 more
    Country: Spain
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Júlia Vergara-Alert; Enric Vidal; Albert Bensaid; Joaquim Segalés;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | ZAPI (115760)

    Emerging and re-emerging pathogens represent a substantial threat to public health, as demonstrated with numerous outbreaks over the past years, including the 2013-2016 outbreak of Ebola virus in western Africa. Coronaviruses are also a threat for humans, as evidenced in 2002/2003 with infection by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which caused more than 8000 human infections with 10% fatality rate in 37 countries. Ten years later, a novel human coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, MERS-CoV), associated with severe pneumonia, arose in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Until December 2016, MERS has accounted for more than 1800 cases and 35% fatality rate. Finding an animal model of disease is key to develop vaccines or antivirals against such emerging pathogens and to understand its pathogenesis. Knowledge of the potential role of domestic livestock and other animal species in the transmission of pathogens is of importance to understand the epidemiology of the disease. Little is known about MERS-CoV animal host range. In this paper, experimental data on potential hosts for MERS-CoV is reviewed. Advantages and limitations of different animal models are evaluated in relation to viral pathogenesis and transmission studies. Finally, the relevance of potential new target species is discussed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nicolás Colaianni-Alfonso; Guillermo Cesar Montiel; Mauro Castro-Sayat; Oriol Roca; Domenico Luca Grieco;
    Country: Spain

    UDTAULÍ

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Albiol, Nil; Aso, Olga; Gómez-Pérez, Lucía; Triquell, Mercè; Roch, Nerea; Lázaro, Elisabeth; Esquirol, Albert; González, Iria; López-Contreras, Joaquín; Sierra, Jorge; +3 more
    Country: Spain
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nakanishi, Tomoko; Pigazzini, Sara; Degenhardt, Frauke; Cordioli, Mattia; Butler-Laporte, Guillaume; Maya-Miles, Douglas; Nafría-Jiménez, Beatriz; Bouysran, Youssef; Niemi, Mari; Palom, Adriana; +55 more
    Countries: Spain, Belgium, Germany, Denmark, Belgium
    Project: EC | LITMUS (777377)

    AG has received support by NordForsk Nordic Trial Alliance (NTA) grant, by Academy of Finland Fellow grant N. 323116 and the Academy of Finland for PREDICT consortium N. 340541. The Richards research group is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) (365825 and 409511), the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the NIH Foundation, Cancer Research UK, Genome Québec, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity and the Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé (FRQS). TN is supported by a research fellowship of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for Young Scientists. GBL is supported by a CIHR scholarship and a joint FRQS and Québec Ministry of Health and Social Services scholarship. JBR is supported by an FRQS Clinical Research Scholarship. Support from Calcul Québec and Compute Canada is acknowledged. TwinsUK is funded by the Welcome Trust, the Medical Research Council, the European Union, the National Institute for Health Research-funded BioResource and the Clinical Research Facility and Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust in partnership with King’s College London. The Biobanque Québec COVID19 is funded by FRQS, Genome Québec and the Public Health Agency of Canada, the McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity and the Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé. These funding agencies had no role in the design, implementation or interpretation of this study. The COVID19-Host(a)ge study received infrastructure support from the DFG Cluster of Excellence 2167 “Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation (PMI)” (DFG Grant: “EXC2167”). The COVID19-Host(a)ge study was supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) within the framework of the Computational Life Sciences funding concept (CompLS grant 031L0165). Genotyping in COVID19-Host(a)ge was supported by a philantropic donation from Stein Erik Hagen. The COVID GWAs, Premed COVID-19 study (COVID19-Host(a)ge_3) was supported by "Grupo de Trabajo en Medicina Personalizada contra el COVID-19 de Andalucia"and also by the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (CIBERehd and CIBERER). Funding comes from COVID-19-GWAS, COVID-PREMED initiatives. Both of them are supported by "Consejeria de Salud y Familias" of the Andalusian Government. DMM is currently funded by the the Andalussian government (Proyectos Estratégicos-Fondos Feder PE-0451-2018). The Columbia University Biobank was supported by Columbia University and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH, through Grant Number UL1TR001873. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or Columbia University. The SPGRX study was supported by the Consejería de Economía, Conocimiento, Empresas y Universidad #CV20-10150. The GEN-COVID study was funded by: the MIUR grant “Dipartimenti di Eccellenza 2018-2020” to the Department of Medical Biotechnologies University of Siena, Italy; the “Intesa San Paolo 2020 charity fund” dedicated to the project NB/2020/0119; and philanthropic donations to the Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena for the COVID-19 host genetics research project (D.L n.18 of March 17, 2020). Part of this research project is also funded by Tuscany Region “Bando Ricerca COVID-19 Toscana” grant to the Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Senese (CUP I49C20000280002). Authors are grateful to: the CINECA consortium for providing computational resources; the Network for Italian Genomes (NIG) (http://www.nig.cineca.it) for its support; the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative (https://www.covid19hg.org/); the Genetic Biobank of Siena, member of BBMRI-IT, Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks (project no. GTB18001), EuroBioBank, and RD-Connect, for managing specimens. Genetics against coronavirus (GENIUS), Humanitas University (COVID19-Host(a)ge_4) was supported by Ricerca Corrente (Italian Ministry of Health), intramural funding (Fondazione Humanitas per la Ricerca). The generous contribution of Banca Intesa San Paolo and of the Dolce&Gabbana Fashion Firm is gratefully acknowledged. Data acquisition and sample processing was supported by COVID-19 Biobank, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Milano; LV group was supported by MyFirst Grant AIRC n.16888, Ricerca Finalizzata Ministero della Salute RF-2016-02364358, Ricerca corrente Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, the European Union (EU) Programme Horizon 2020 (under grant agreement No. 777377) for the project LITMUS- “Liver Investigation: Testing Marker Utility in Steatohepatitis”, Programme “Photonics” under grant agreement “101016726” for the project “REVEAL: Neuronal microscopy for cell behavioural examination and manipulation”, Fondazione Patrimonio Ca’ Granda “Liver Bible” PR-0361. DP was supported by Ricerca corrente Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, CV PREVITAL “Strategie di prevenzione primaria nella popolazione Italiana” Ministero della Salute, and Associazione Italiana per la Prevenzione dell’Epatite Virale (COPEV). Genetic modifiers for COVID-19 related illness (BeLCovid_1) was supported by the "Fonds Erasme". The Host genetics and immune response in SARS-Cov-2 infection (BelCovid_2) study was supported by grants from Fondation Léon Fredericq and from Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS). The INMUNGEN-CoV2 study was funded by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. KUL is supported by the German Research Foundation (LU 1944/3-1) SweCovid is funded by the SciLifeLab/KAW national COVID-19 research program project grant to Michael Hultström (KAW 2020.0182) and the Swedish Research Council to Robert Frithiof (2014-02569 and 2014-07606). HZ is supported by Jeansson Stiftelser, Magnus Bergvalls Stiftelse. The COMRI cohort is funded by Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. Genotyping for the COMRI cohort was performed and funded by the Genotyping Laboratory of Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM Technology Centre, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. These funding agencies had no role in the design, implementation or interpretation of this study. Background: There is considerable variability in COVID-19 outcomes amongst younger adults—and some of this variation may be due to genetic predisposition. We characterized the clinical implications of the major genetic risk factor for COVID-19 severity, and its age-dependent effect, using individual-level data in a large international multi-centre consortium. Method: The major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor is a chromosome 3 locus, tagged by the marker rs10490770. We combined individual level data for 13,424 COVID-19 positive patients (N=6,689 hospitalized) from 17 cohorts in nine countries to assess the association of this genetic marker with mortality, COVID-19-related complications and laboratory values. We next examined if the magnitude of these associations varied by age and were independent from known clinical COVID-19 risk factors. Findings: We found that rs10490770 risk allele carriers experienced an increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1·4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·2–1·6) and COVID-19 related mortality (HR 1·5, 95%CI 1·3–1·8). Risk allele carriers had increased odds of several COVID-19 complications: severe respiratory failure (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95%CI 1·6-2·6), venous thromboembolism (OR 1·7, 95%CI 1·2-2·4), and hepatic injury (OR 1·6, 95%CI 1·2-2·0). Risk allele carriers ≤ 60 years had higher odds of death or severe respiratory failure (OR 2·6, 95%CI 1·8-3·9) compared to those > 60 years OR 1·5 (95%CI 1·3-1·9, interaction p-value=0·04). Amongst individuals ≤ 60 years who died or experienced severe respiratory COVID-19 outcome, we found that 31·8% (95%CI 27·6-36·2) were risk variant carriers, compared to 13·9% (95%CI 12·6-15·2%) of those not experiencing these outcomes. Prediction of death or severe respiratory failure among those ≤ 60 years improved when including the risk allele (AUC 0·82 vs 0·84, p=0·016) and the prediction ability of rs10490770 risk allele was similar to, or better than, most established clinical risk factors. Interpretation: The major common COVID-19 risk locus on chromosome 3 is associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality—and these are more pronounced amongst individuals ≤ 60 years. The effect on COVID-19 severity was similar to, or larger than most established risk factors, suggesting potential implications for clinical risk management. CV PREVITAL “Strategie di prevenzione primaria nella popolazione Italiana” Ministero della Salute, and Associazione Italiana per la Prevenzione dell’Epatite Virale (COPEV) Genotyping Laboratory of Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM Technology Centre, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Clinical Research Facility and Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity and the Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé (FRQS) CIHR scholarship and a joint FRQS and Québec Ministry of Health and Social Services scholarship European Union (EU) Programme Horizon 2020 (under grant agreement No. 777377) "Grupo de Trabajo en Medicina Personalizada contra el COVID-19 de Andalucia" “Intesa San Paolo 2020 charity fund” dedicated to the project NB/2020/0119 Ricerca corrente Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico SciLifeLab/KAW national COVID-19 research program project (KAW 2020.0182) Andalusian government (Proyectos Estratégicos-Fondos Feder PE-0451-2018) Consejería de Economía, Conocimiento, Empresas y Universidad #CV20-10150 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) (365825 and 409511) Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for Young Scientists "Consejeria de Salud y Familias" of the Andalusian Government McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity Ricerca Finalizzata Ministero della Salute RF-2016-02364358 National Institute for Health Research-funded BioResource Fondazione Patrimonio Ca’ Granda “Liver Bible” PR-0361 Swedish Research Council (2014-02569 and 2014-07606) Instituto de Salud Carlos III (CIBERehd and CIBERER) National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Academy of Finland for PREDICT consortium N. 340541. Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital MIUR grant “Dipartimenti di Eccellenza 2018-2020” Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany Jeansson Stiftelser, Magnus Bergvalls Stiftelse Tuscany Region “Bando Ricerca COVID-19 Toscana” Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Ricerca Corrente (Italian Ministry of Health) Academy of Finland Fellow grant N. 323116 Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS) German Research Foundation (LU 1944/3-1) Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Fondazione Humanitas per la Ricerca FRQS Clinical Research Scholarship Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Milano Network for Italian Genomes (NIG) COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé Public Health Agency of Canada NIH Grant Number UL1TR001873 Dolce&Gabbana Fashion Firm MyFirst Grant AIRC n.16888 COVID-PREMED initiatives Genetic Biobank of Siena Fondation Léon Fredericq “Photonics” “101016726” (CompLS grant 031L0165) Banca Intesa San Paolo Medical Research Counc (DFG Grant: “EXC2167”) King’s College London Columbia University Cancer Research UK CINECA consortium COVID-19 Biobank Stein Erik Hagen Compute Canada "Fonds Erasme" NIH Foundation European Union Genome Québec COVID-19-GWAS Calcul Québec Welcome Trust EuroBioBank RD-Connect

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aguilar-Martínez, Alicia; Bosque Prous, Marina; González-Casals, Helena; Colillas-Malet, Ester; Puigcorbé, Susanna; Esquius, Laura; Espelt, Albert; Universitat Central de Catalunya;
    Publisher: MDPI
    Country: Spain

    Adolescence is a critical period in the consolidation of healthy lifestyles that can last into adulthood. To analyze changes in food consumption and eating behaviors in high-school adolescents during the first confinement, a cross-sectional study was conducted at the end of confinement in Spain. Changes in the frequency or quantity of consumption of different types of food and food-related behaviors were analyzed. Socioeconomic and health-related variables were also considered. To determine whether dietary changes were related to socioeconomic position (SEP), Poisson regression models with robust variance were estimated. Overall, there were some changes towards a healthier diet such as an increase in fruit consumption (38.9%) and a decrease in the consumption of soft drinks (49.8%), sweets and pastries (39.3%), and convenience foods (49.2%). Some changes, however, were related to less healthy behaviors, such as a more irregular pattern of meal distribution (39.9%) or an increase in snacking between meals (56.4%). Changes towards less healthy eating were also related to students’ SEP. The risk of worsening the diet was found to be 21% higher in adolescents from a more disadvantaged SEP. Future public policies could be adapted to avoid increasing nutritional and health inequalities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Beatriz Almolda; Berta González; Bernardo Castellano;
    Country: Spain

    Infiltration of immune cells in the central nervous system is a common hallmark in different neuroinflammatory conditions. Accumulating evidences indicate that resident glial cells can establish a cross-talk with infiltrated immune cells, including T-cells, regulating their recruitment, activation and function within the CNS. Although the healthy CNS has been though to be devoid of professional dendritic cells (DCs), numerous studies have been reported the presence of a population of DCs in specific locations such as the meninges, choroid plexuses and the perivascular space. Moreover, the infiltration of DC-precursors during neuroinflammatory situations has been proposed, suggesting a putative role of these cells in the regulation of lymphocyte activity within the CNS. On the other hand, under determined circumstances, microglial cells are able to acquire a phenotype of DC expressing a wide range of molecules that equipped these cells with all the necessary machinery for the communication with T-cells. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the expression of molecules involved in the cross-talk with T-cells in both microglial cells and DCs and discuss the potential contribution of each of these cell populations on the control of lymphocyte function within the CNS.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ferran Tarrés-Freixas; Benjamin Trinité; Anna Pons-Grífols; Miguel Romero-Durana; Eva Riveira-Muñoz; Carlos Ávila-Nieto; Mónica Pérez; Edurne Garcia-Vidal; Daniel Perez-Zsolt; Jordana Muñoz-Basagoiti; +17 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media
    Country: Spain

    The emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) may display enhanced transmissibility, more severity and/or immune evasion; however, the pathogenesis of these new VOCs in experimental SARS-CoV-2 models or the potential infection of other animal species is not completely understood. Here we infected K18-hACE2 transgenic mice with B.1, B.1.351/Beta, B.1.617.2/Delta and BA.1.1/Omicron isolates and demonstrated heterogeneous infectivity and pathogenesis. B.1.351/Beta variant was the most pathogenic, while BA.1.1/Omicron led to lower viral RNA in the absence of major visible clinical signs. In parallel, we infected wildtype (WT) mice and confirmed that, contrary to B.1 and B.1.617.2/Delta, B.1.351/Beta and BA.1.1/Omicron can infect them. Infection in WT mice coursed without major clinical signs and viral RNA was transient and undetectable in the lungs by day 7 post-infection. In silico modeling supported these findings by predicting B.1.351/Beta receptor binding domain (RBD) mutations result in an increased affinity for both human and murine ACE2 receptors, while BA.1/Omicron RBD mutations only show increased affinity for murine ACE2. The research of CBIG consortium (constituted by IRTA-CReSA, BSC & IrsiCaixa) is supported by Grifols. We thank Foundation Dormeur for financial support for the acquisition of the QuantStudio-5 real time PCR system. CÁ-N has a grant by Secretaria d’Universitats i Recerca de la Generalitat de Catalunya and Fons Social Europeu. EG-V is a research fellow from PERIS (SLT017/20/000090). This work was partially funded by grant PID2020-117145RB-I00 from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (NI-U) the Departament de Salut of the Generalitat de Catalunya (grant SLD016 to JB and Grant SLD015 to JC), the Spanish Health Institute Carlos III (Grant PI17/01518. PI20/00093 to JB and PI18/01332 to JC), Fundació La Marató de TV3 (Project202126-30-21), CERCA Programme/Generalitat de Catalunya 2017 SGR 252, and the crowdfunding initiatives #joemcorono (https://www.yomecorono.com), BonPreu/Esclat and Correos. Funded in part by Fundació Glòria Soler (JB). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, the decision to publish, or the preparation of the manuscript. Peer Reviewed "Article signat per 27 autors/es: Ferran Tarrés-Freixas, Benjamin Trinité, Anna Pons-Grífols, Miguel Romero-Durana, Eva Riveira-Muñoz, Carlos Ávila-Nieto, Mónica Pérez, Edurne Garcia-Vidal, Daniel Perez-Zsolt, Jordana Muñoz-Basagoiti, Dàlia Raïch-Regué, Nuria Izquierdo-Useros, Cristina Andrés, Andrés Antón, Tomàs Pumarola, Ignacio Blanco, Marc Noguera-Julián, Victor Guallar, Rosalba Lepore, Alfonso Valencia, Victor Urrea, Júlia Vergara-Alert, Bonaventura Clotet, Ester Ballana, Jorge Carrillo, Joaquim Segalés and Julià Blanco"

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    M. De la Sen; Asier Ibeas;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Country: Spain

    Altres ajuts: Instituto de Salud Carlos III (COV 20/01213) In this paper, we study the nonnegativity and stability properties of the solutions of a newly proposed extended SEIR epidemic model, the so-called SE(Is)(Ih)AR epidemic model which might be of potential interest in the characterization and control of the COVID-19 pandemic evolution. The proposed model incorporates both asymptomatic infectious and hospitalized infectious subpopulations to the standard infectious subpopulation of the classical SEIR model. In parallel, it also incorporates feedback vaccination and antiviral treatment controls. The exposed subpopulation has three different transitions to the three kinds of infectious subpopulations under eventually different proportionality parameters. The existence of a unique disease-free equilibrium point and a unique endemic one is proved together with the calculation of their explicit components. Their local asymptotic stability properties and the attainability of the endemic equilibrium point are investigated based on the next generation matrix properties, the value of the basic reproduction number, and nonnegativity properties of the solution and its equilibrium states. The reproduction numbers in the presence of one or both controls is linked to the control-free reproduction number to emphasize that such a number decreases with the control gains. We also prove that, depending on the value of the basic reproduction number, only one of them is a global asymptotic attractor and that the solution has no limit cycles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rodon, Jordi; Okba, Nisreen M.A.; Te, Nigeer; van Dieren, Brenda; Bosch, Berend Jan; Bensaid, Albert; Segalés, Joaquim; Haagmans, Bart L.; Vergara-Alert, Júlia; LS Virologie; +1 more
    Countries: Spain, Spain, Netherlands
    Project: EC | ZAPI (115760), EC | VetBioNet (731014)

    The ongoing Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks pose a worldwide public health threat. Blocking MERS-CoV zoonotic transmission from dromedary camels, the animal reservoir, could potentially reduce the number of primary human cases. Here we report MERS-CoV transmission from experimentally infected llamas to naïve animals. Directly inoculated llamas shed virus for at least 6 days and could infect all in-contact naïve animals 4-5 days after exposure. With the aim to block virus transmission, we examined the efficacy of a recombinant spike S1-protein vaccine. In contrast to naïve animals, in-contact vaccinated llamas did not shed infectious virus upon exposure to directly inoculated llamas, consistent with the induction of strong virus neutralizing antibody responses. Our data provide further evidence that vaccination of the reservoir host may impede MERS-CoV zoonotic transmission to humans. info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
255 Research products, page 1 of 26
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tomer Illouz; Arya Biragyn; Milana Frenkel-Morgenstern; Orly Weissberg; Alessandro Gorohovski; Eugene Merzon; Ilan Green; Florencia Iulita; Lisi Flores-Aguilar; Mara Dierssen; +14 more
    Country: Spain
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Júlia Vergara-Alert; Enric Vidal; Albert Bensaid; Joaquim Segalés;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | ZAPI (115760)

    Emerging and re-emerging pathogens represent a substantial threat to public health, as demonstrated with numerous outbreaks over the past years, including the 2013-2016 outbreak of Ebola virus in western Africa. Coronaviruses are also a threat for humans, as evidenced in 2002/2003 with infection by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which caused more than 8000 human infections with 10% fatality rate in 37 countries. Ten years later, a novel human coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, MERS-CoV), associated with severe pneumonia, arose in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Until December 2016, MERS has accounted for more than 1800 cases and 35% fatality rate. Finding an animal model of disease is key to develop vaccines or antivirals against such emerging pathogens and to understand its pathogenesis. Knowledge of the potential role of domestic livestock and other animal species in the transmission of pathogens is of importance to understand the epidemiology of the disease. Little is known about MERS-CoV animal host range. In this paper, experimental data on potential hosts for MERS-CoV is reviewed. Advantages and limitations of different animal models are evaluated in relation to viral pathogenesis and transmission studies. Finally, the relevance of potential new target species is discussed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nicolás Colaianni-Alfonso; Guillermo Cesar Montiel; Mauro Castro-Sayat; Oriol Roca; Domenico Luca Grieco;
    Country: Spain

    UDTAULÍ

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Albiol, Nil; Aso, Olga; Gómez-Pérez, Lucía; Triquell, Mercè; Roch, Nerea; Lázaro, Elisabeth; Esquirol, Albert; González, Iria; López-Contreras, Joaquín; Sierra, Jorge; +3 more
    Country: Spain
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nakanishi, Tomoko; Pigazzini, Sara; Degenhardt, Frauke; Cordioli, Mattia; Butler-Laporte, Guillaume; Maya-Miles, Douglas; Nafría-Jiménez, Beatriz; Bouysran, Youssef; Niemi, Mari; Palom, Adriana; +55 more
    Countries: Spain, Belgium, Germany, Denmark, Belgium
    Project: EC | LITMUS (777377)

    AG has received support by NordForsk Nordic Trial Alliance (NTA) grant, by Academy of Finland Fellow grant N. 323116 and the Academy of Finland for PREDICT consortium N. 340541. The Richards research group is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) (365825 and 409511), the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the NIH Foundation, Cancer Research UK, Genome Québec, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity and the Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé (FRQS). TN is supported by a research fellowship of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for Young Scientists. GBL is supported by a CIHR scholarship and a joint FRQS and Québec Ministry of Health and Social Services scholarship. JBR is supported by an FRQS Clinical Research Scholarship. Support from Calcul Québec and Compute Canada is acknowledged. TwinsUK is funded by the Welcome Trust, the Medical Research Council, the European Union, the National Institute for Health Research-funded BioResource and the Clinical Research Facility and Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust in partnership with King’s College London. The Biobanque Québec COVID19 is funded by FRQS, Genome Québec and the Public Health Agency of Canada, the McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity and the Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé. These funding agencies had no role in the design, implementation or interpretation of this study. The COVID19-Host(a)ge study received infrastructure support from the DFG Cluster of Excellence 2167 “Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation (PMI)” (DFG Grant: “EXC2167”). The COVID19-Host(a)ge study was supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) within the framework of the Computational Life Sciences funding concept (CompLS grant 031L0165). Genotyping in COVID19-Host(a)ge was supported by a philantropic donation from Stein Erik Hagen. The COVID GWAs, Premed COVID-19 study (COVID19-Host(a)ge_3) was supported by "Grupo de Trabajo en Medicina Personalizada contra el COVID-19 de Andalucia"and also by the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (CIBERehd and CIBERER). Funding comes from COVID-19-GWAS, COVID-PREMED initiatives. Both of them are supported by "Consejeria de Salud y Familias" of the Andalusian Government. DMM is currently funded by the the Andalussian government (Proyectos Estratégicos-Fondos Feder PE-0451-2018). The Columbia University Biobank was supported by Columbia University and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH, through Grant Number UL1TR001873. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or Columbia University. The SPGRX study was supported by the Consejería de Economía, Conocimiento, Empresas y Universidad #CV20-10150. The GEN-COVID study was funded by: the MIUR grant “Dipartimenti di Eccellenza 2018-2020” to the Department of Medical Biotechnologies University of Siena, Italy; the “Intesa San Paolo 2020 charity fund” dedicated to the project NB/2020/0119; and philanthropic donations to the Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena for the COVID-19 host genetics research project (D.L n.18 of March 17, 2020). Part of this research project is also funded by Tuscany Region “Bando Ricerca COVID-19 Toscana” grant to the Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Senese (CUP I49C20000280002). Authors are grateful to: the CINECA consortium for providing computational resources; the Network for Italian Genomes (NIG) (http://www.nig.cineca.it) for its support; the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative (https://www.covid19hg.org/); the Genetic Biobank of Siena, member of BBMRI-IT, Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks (project no. GTB18001), EuroBioBank, and RD-Connect, for managing specimens. Genetics against coronavirus (GENIUS), Humanitas University (COVID19-Host(a)ge_4) was supported by Ricerca Corrente (Italian Ministry of Health), intramural funding (Fondazione Humanitas per la Ricerca). The generous contribution of Banca Intesa San Paolo and of the Dolce&Gabbana Fashion Firm is gratefully acknowledged. Data acquisition and sample processing was supported by COVID-19 Biobank, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Milano; LV group was supported by MyFirst Grant AIRC n.16888, Ricerca Finalizzata Ministero della Salute RF-2016-02364358, Ricerca corrente Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, the European Union (EU) Programme Horizon 2020 (under grant agreement No. 777377) for the project LITMUS- “Liver Investigation: Testing Marker Utility in Steatohepatitis”, Programme “Photonics” under grant agreement “101016726” for the project “REVEAL: Neuronal microscopy for cell behavioural examination and manipulation”, Fondazione Patrimonio Ca’ Granda “Liver Bible” PR-0361. DP was supported by Ricerca corrente Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, CV PREVITAL “Strategie di prevenzione primaria nella popolazione Italiana” Ministero della Salute, and Associazione Italiana per la Prevenzione dell’Epatite Virale (COPEV). Genetic modifiers for COVID-19 related illness (BeLCovid_1) was supported by the "Fonds Erasme". The Host genetics and immune response in SARS-Cov-2 infection (BelCovid_2) study was supported by grants from Fondation Léon Fredericq and from Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS). The INMUNGEN-CoV2 study was funded by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. KUL is supported by the German Research Foundation (LU 1944/3-1) SweCovid is funded by the SciLifeLab/KAW national COVID-19 research program project grant to Michael Hultström (KAW 2020.0182) and the Swedish Research Council to Robert Frithiof (2014-02569 and 2014-07606). HZ is supported by Jeansson Stiftelser, Magnus Bergvalls Stiftelse. The COMRI cohort is funded by Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. Genotyping for the COMRI cohort was performed and funded by the Genotyping Laboratory of Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM Technology Centre, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. These funding agencies had no role in the design, implementation or interpretation of this study. Background: There is considerable variability in COVID-19 outcomes amongst younger adults—and some of this variation may be due to genetic predisposition. We characterized the clinical implications of the major genetic risk factor for COVID-19 severity, and its age-dependent effect, using individual-level data in a large international multi-centre consortium. Method: The major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor is a chromosome 3 locus, tagged by the marker rs10490770. We combined individual level data for 13,424 COVID-19 positive patients (N=6,689 hospitalized) from 17 cohorts in nine countries to assess the association of this genetic marker with mortality, COVID-19-related complications and laboratory values. We next examined if the magnitude of these associations varied by age and were independent from known clinical COVID-19 risk factors. Findings: We found that rs10490770 risk allele carriers experienced an increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1·4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·2–1·6) and COVID-19 related mortality (HR 1·5, 95%CI 1·3–1·8). Risk allele carriers had increased odds of several COVID-19 complications: severe respiratory failure (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95%CI 1·6-2·6), venous thromboembolism (OR 1·7, 95%CI 1·2-2·4), and hepatic injury (OR 1·6, 95%CI 1·2-2·0). Risk allele carriers ≤ 60 years had higher odds of death or severe respiratory failure (OR 2·6, 95%CI 1·8-3·9) compared to those > 60 years OR 1·5 (95%CI 1·3-1·9, interaction p-value=0·04). Amongst individuals ≤ 60 years who died or experienced severe respiratory COVID-19 outcome, we found that 31·8% (95%CI 27·6-36·2) were risk variant carriers, compared to 13·9% (95%CI 12·6-15·2%) of those not experiencing these outcomes. Prediction of death or severe respiratory failure among those ≤ 60 years improved when including the risk allele (AUC 0·82 vs 0·84, p=0·016) and the prediction ability of rs10490770 risk allele was similar to, or better than, most established clinical risk factors. Interpretation: The major common COVID-19 risk locus on chromosome 3 is associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality—and these are more pronounced amongst individuals ≤ 60 years. The effect on COVID-19 severity was similar to, or larger than most established risk factors, suggesting potential implications for clinical risk management. CV PREVITAL “Strategie di prevenzione primaria nella popolazione Italiana” Ministero della Salute, and Associazione Italiana per la Prevenzione dell’Epatite Virale (COPEV) Genotyping Laboratory of Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM Technology Centre, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Clinical Research Facility and Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity and the Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé (FRQS) CIHR scholarship and a joint FRQS and Québec Ministry of Health and Social Services scholarship European Union (EU) Programme Horizon 2020 (under grant agreement No. 777377) "Grupo de Trabajo en Medicina Personalizada contra el COVID-19 de Andalucia" “Intesa San Paolo 2020 charity fund” dedicated to the project NB/2020/0119 Ricerca corrente Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico SciLifeLab/KAW national COVID-19 research program project (KAW 2020.0182) Andalusian government (Proyectos Estratégicos-Fondos Feder PE-0451-2018) Consejería de Economía, Conocimiento, Empresas y Universidad #CV20-10150 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) (365825 and 409511) Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for Young Scientists "Consejeria de Salud y Familias" of the Andalusian Government McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity Ricerca Finalizzata Ministero della Salute RF-2016-02364358 National Institute for Health Research-funded BioResource Fondazione Patrimonio Ca’ Granda “Liver Bible” PR-0361 Swedish Research Council (2014-02569 and 2014-07606) Instituto de Salud Carlos III (CIBERehd and CIBERER) National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Academy of Finland for PREDICT consortium N. 340541. Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital MIUR grant “Dipartimenti di Eccellenza 2018-2020” Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany Jeansson Stiftelser, Magnus Bergvalls Stiftelse Tuscany Region “Bando Ricerca COVID-19 Toscana” Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Ricerca Corrente (Italian Ministry of Health) Academy of Finland Fellow grant N. 323116 Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS) German Research Foundation (LU 1944/3-1) Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Fondazione Humanitas per la Ricerca FRQS Clinical Research Scholarship Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Milano Network for Italian Genomes (NIG) COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative Fonds de Recherche Québec Santé Public Health Agency of Canada NIH Grant Number UL1TR001873 Dolce&Gabbana Fashion Firm MyFirst Grant AIRC n.16888 COVID-PREMED initiatives Genetic Biobank of Siena Fondation Léon Fredericq “Photonics” “101016726” (CompLS grant 031L0165) Banca Intesa San Paolo Medical Research Counc (DFG Grant: “EXC2167”) King’s College London Columbia University Cancer Research UK CINECA consortium COVID-19 Biobank Stein Erik Hagen Compute Canada "Fonds Erasme" NIH Foundation European Union Genome Québec COVID-19-GWAS Calcul Québec Welcome Trust EuroBioBank RD-Connect

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aguilar-Martínez, Alicia; Bosque Prous, Marina; González-Casals, Helena; Colillas-Malet, Ester; Puigcorbé, Susanna; Esquius, Laura; Espelt, Albert; Universitat Central de Catalunya;
    Publisher: MDPI
    Country: Spain

    Adolescence is a critical period in the consolidation of healthy lifestyles that can last into adulthood. To analyze changes in food consumption and eating behaviors in high-school adolescents during the first confinement, a cross-sectional study was conducted at the end of confinement in Spain. Changes in the frequency or quantity of consumption of different types of food and food-related behaviors were analyzed. Socioeconomic and health-related variables were also considered. To determine whether dietary changes were related to socioeconomic position (SEP), Poisson regression models with robust variance were estimated. Overall, there were some changes towards a healthier diet such as an increase in fruit consumption (38.9%) and a decrease in the consumption of soft drinks (49.8%), sweets and pastries (39.3%), and convenience foods (49.2%). Some changes, however, were related to less healthy behaviors, such as a more irregular pattern of meal distribution (39.9%) or an increase in snacking between meals (56.4%). Changes towards less healthy eating were also related to students’ SEP. The risk of worsening the diet was found to be 21% higher in adolescents from a more disadvantaged SEP. Future public policies could be adapted to avoid increasing nutritional and health inequalities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Beatriz Almolda; Berta González; Bernardo Castellano;
    Country: Spain

    Infiltration of immune cells in the central nervous system is a common hallmark in different neuroinflammatory conditions. Accumulating evidences indicate that resident glial cells can establish a cross-talk with infiltrated immune cells, including T-cells, regulating their recruitment, activation and function within the CNS. Although the healthy CNS has been though to be devoid of professional dendritic cells (DCs), numerous studies have been reported the presence of a population of DCs in specific locations such as the meninges, choroid plexuses and the perivascular space. Moreover, the infiltration of DC-precursors during neuroinflammatory situations has been proposed, suggesting a putative role of these cells in the regulation of lymphocyte activity within the CNS. On the other hand, under determined circumstances, microglial cells are able to acquire a phenotype of DC expressing a wide range of molecules that equipped these cells with all the necessary machinery for the communication with T-cells. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the expression of molecules involved in the cross-talk with T-cells in both microglial cells and DCs and discuss the potential contribution of each of these cell populations on the control of lymphocyte function within the CNS.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ferran Tarrés-Freixas; Benjamin Trinité; Anna Pons-Grífols; Miguel Romero-Durana; Eva Riveira-Muñoz; Carlos Ávila-Nieto; Mónica Pérez; Edurne Garcia-Vidal; Daniel Perez-Zsolt; Jordana Muñoz-Basagoiti; +17 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media
    Country: Spain

    The emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) may display enhanced transmissibility, more severity and/or immune evasion; however, the pathogenesis of these new VOCs in experimental SARS-CoV-2 models or the potential infection of other animal species is not completely understood. Here we infected K18-hACE2 transgenic mice with B.1, B.1.351/Beta, B.1.617.2/Delta and BA.1.1/Omicron isolates and demonstrated heterogeneous infectivity and pathogenesis. B.1.351/Beta variant was the most pathogenic, while BA.1.1/Omicron led to lower viral RNA in the absence of major visible clinical signs. In parallel, we infected wildtype (WT) mice and confirmed that, contrary to B.1 and B.1.617.2/Delta, B.1.351/Beta and BA.1.1/Omicron can infect them. Infection in WT mice coursed without major clinical signs and viral RNA was transient and undetectable in the lungs by day 7 post-infection. In silico modeling supported these findings by predicting B.1.351/Beta receptor binding domain (RBD) mutations result in an increased affinity for both human and murine ACE2 receptors, while BA.1/Omicron RBD mutations only show increased affinity for murine ACE2. The research of CBIG consortium (constituted by IRTA-CReSA, BSC & IrsiCaixa) is supported by Grifols. We thank Foundation Dormeur for financial support for the acquisition of the QuantStudio-5 real time PCR system. CÁ-N has a grant by Secretaria d’Universitats i Recerca de la Generalitat de Catalunya and Fons Social Europeu. EG-V is a research fellow from PERIS (SLT017/20/000090). This work was partially funded by grant PID2020-117145RB-I00 from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (NI-U) the Departament de Salut of the Generalitat de Catalunya (grant SLD016 to JB and Grant SLD015 to JC), the Spanish Health Institute Carlos III (Grant PI17/01518. PI20/00093 to JB and PI18/01332 to JC), Fundació La Marató de TV3 (Project202126-30-21), CERCA Programme/Generalitat de Catalunya 2017 SGR 252, and the crowdfunding initiatives #joemcorono (https://www.yomecorono.com), BonPreu/Esclat and Correos. Funded in part by Fundació Glòria Soler (JB). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, the decision to publish, or the preparation of the manuscript. Peer Reviewed "Article signat per 27 autors/es: Ferran Tarrés-Freixas, Benjamin Trinité, Anna Pons-Grífols, Miguel Romero-Durana, Eva Riveira-Muñoz, Carlos Ávila-Nieto, Mónica Pérez, Edurne Garcia-Vidal, Daniel Perez-Zsolt, Jordana Muñoz-Basagoiti, Dàlia Raïch-Regué, Nuria Izquierdo-Useros, Cristina Andrés, Andrés Antón, Tomàs Pumarola, Ignacio Blanco, Marc Noguera-Julián, Victor Guallar, Rosalba Lepore, Alfonso Valencia, Victor Urrea, Júlia Vergara-Alert, Bonaventura Clotet, Ester Ballana, Jorge Carrillo, Joaquim Segalés and Julià Blanco"

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    M. De la Sen; Asier Ibeas;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Country: Spain

    Altres ajuts: Instituto de Salud Carlos III (COV 20/01213) In this paper, we study the nonnegativity and stability properties of the solutions of a newly proposed extended SEIR epidemic model, the so-called SE(Is)(Ih)AR epidemic model which might be of potential interest in the characterization and control of the COVID-19 pandemic evolution. The proposed model incorporates both asymptomatic infectious and hospitalized infectious subpopulations to the standard infectious subpopulation of the classical SEIR model. In parallel, it also incorporates feedback vaccination and antiviral treatment controls. The exposed subpopulation has three different transitions to the three kinds of infectious subpopulations under eventually different proportionality parameters. The existence of a unique disease-free equilibrium point and a unique endemic one is proved together with the calculation of their explicit components. Their local asymptotic stability properties and the attainability of the endemic equilibrium point are investigated based on the next generation matrix properties, the value of the basic reproduction number, and nonnegativity properties of the solution and its equilibrium states. The reproduction numbers in the presence of one or both controls is linked to the control-free reproduction number to emphasize that such a number decreases with the control gains. We also prove that, depending on the value of the basic reproduction number, only one of them is a global asymptotic attractor and that the solution has no limit cycles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rodon, Jordi; Okba, Nisreen M.A.; Te, Nigeer; van Dieren, Brenda; Bosch, Berend Jan; Bensaid, Albert; Segalés, Joaquim; Haagmans, Bart L.; Vergara-Alert, Júlia; LS Virologie; +1 more
    Countries: Spain, Spain, Netherlands
    Project: EC | ZAPI (115760), EC | VetBioNet (731014)

    The ongoing Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks pose a worldwide public health threat. Blocking MERS-CoV zoonotic transmission from dromedary camels, the animal reservoir, could potentially reduce the number of primary human cases. Here we report MERS-CoV transmission from experimentally infected llamas to naïve animals. Directly inoculated llamas shed virus for at least 6 days and could infect all in-contact naïve animals 4-5 days after exposure. With the aim to block virus transmission, we examined the efficacy of a recombinant spike S1-protein vaccine. In contrast to naïve animals, in-contact vaccinated llamas did not shed infectious virus upon exposure to directly inoculated llamas, consistent with the induction of strong virus neutralizing antibody responses. Our data provide further evidence that vaccination of the reservoir host may impede MERS-CoV zoonotic transmission to humans. info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion