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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
38 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • Closed Access
  • Conference object
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  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Louise Redder; Sören Möller; Mary Ellen Jarden; Cl, Andersen; Henrik Frederiksen; Henrik Gregersen; Anja Klostergaard; Morten Saaby Steffensen; Per Trøllund Pedersen; Maja Hinge; +6 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Glintborg, B.; Jensen, D. V.; Engel, S.; Terslev, L.; Jensen, M. Pfeiffer; Hendricks, O.; Ostergaard, M.; Rasmussen, S. H.; Adelsten, T.; Danebod, K.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Henning Jørgensen;
    Country: Denmark

    Activation has no real answer to the new challenges in the labour market after covid-19 and new efforts are to be foreseen.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shulzhenko, Elena; Secchi, Davide; Senderovitz, Martin; Hansen, Kristian Rune; van Bakel, Marian;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Olesen, T. W.; Tyler, P. D.; Lassen, A. T.; Shapiro I, N.; Burke, R. C.; Wolfe, R. E.;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2021
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Søren Hansen; Karl Damkjær Hansen;
    Publisher: ACM
    Country: Denmark

    This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment. This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Morten Borg; Torben Hansen; Nanna Weigelt; Torben Riis; Anders Løkke;
    Country: Denmark

    Historically, lung cancer was often diagnosed in an advanced state and patients were seldom candidates for lung resection. With the increase use of CT, lung cancer is more often diagnosed at and early state and resection rates have increased. As a result, lung cancer survival has improved. However, more patients now live with sequelae of thoracic surgery. There is no optimal method of follow-up and surveillance after lung cancer resection. In Denmark, patients are monitored for five years with CT scans and regular outpatient visit at either the Department of Respiratory Diseases or Department of Oncology.In this study 50 patients were seen 3 months following lung cancer resection in the Department of Respiratory Diseases. They filled out a quality of life questionnaire focusing on physical and mental issues following lung cancer investigation and operation. They performed a spirometry and inhalation medicine and tobacco use was recorded.The majority of patients had physical symptoms (86%), main complaints were shortness of breath, fatigue, cough and weight loss. On the contrary, only 38% of patients had mental complaints at follow-up, the main issue being emotional distress (34%). Only 22% of patients used inhalation medicine (SABA, LABA or LAMA), despite the fact that 48% was obstructive on spirometry and mean mMRC score was 1. 14% of patients were active smokers while 46% had smoked during the past 12 months.The majority of patients presented with physical symptoms, while a minority had mental problems after lung cancer resection. Hence, the outpatient visits should focus on physical issues, rehabilitation, smoking cessation and prescription of inhalation medicine; while screening for patients with mental problems.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 1630.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session “Respiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" era”.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Attauabi, M.; Dahlerup, J. F.; Poulsen, A.; Hansen, M. Rosager; Vester-Andersen, M. K.; Eraslan, S.; Prahm, A. P.; Pedersen, N.; Larsen, L.; Jess, T.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Attauabi, M.; Dahlerup, J. F.; Poulsen, A.; Hansen, M. R.; Vester-Andersen, M. K.; Eraslan, S.; Prahm, A. P.; Pedersen, N.; Larsen, L.; Jess, T.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Ulla Møller Weinreich; Rina Juel Kaptajn; Tina Helle;
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    Background: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) impairs patients’ activity of daily living (ADL) and increases dependence on help from others; home care service, private household service, relatives, friends and neighbors.Aim: To describe the magnitude of the need for help in terms of who provides the help, how much time is used on help and help to which ADLs.Methods: One hundred patients (n=100) living with COPD as their primary diagnosis, living in ordinary housing, in the age of 50+ participated in this descriptive, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey addressing the need for help and assistance.Results: Baseline characteristics: 36% male, 64% female, mean age 71 years old (±10), mean FEV1% 69 (±14), 42% lived alone. ADL-I demonstrated that patients indicated need of help for cleaning (70%); home maintenance (36%); personal care (33%), of those 12% for bathing and 7% for getting dressed; shopping (31%) and laundry (14%). Patients received help from relatives (52%), private housekeeping (26%) and home care service (22%). The help from relatives was the most prevalent help on a daily basis: 21.3% of patients received help once or several times per day, whereas home service primarily was provided every fortnight (24%).Conclusion: In COPD even patients with mild lung function are dependent on and need help for daily activities. Help from relatives should not be underestimated, since they are the main caregivers. Yet, this is critical as almost half of this population live alone.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 955.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session “Respiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" era”.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
38 Research products, page 1 of 4
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Louise Redder; Sören Möller; Mary Ellen Jarden; Cl, Andersen; Henrik Frederiksen; Henrik Gregersen; Anja Klostergaard; Morten Saaby Steffensen; Per Trøllund Pedersen; Maja Hinge; +6 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Glintborg, B.; Jensen, D. V.; Engel, S.; Terslev, L.; Jensen, M. Pfeiffer; Hendricks, O.; Ostergaard, M.; Rasmussen, S. H.; Adelsten, T.; Danebod, K.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Henning Jørgensen;
    Country: Denmark

    Activation has no real answer to the new challenges in the labour market after covid-19 and new efforts are to be foreseen.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shulzhenko, Elena; Secchi, Davide; Senderovitz, Martin; Hansen, Kristian Rune; van Bakel, Marian;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Olesen, T. W.; Tyler, P. D.; Lassen, A. T.; Shapiro I, N.; Burke, R. C.; Wolfe, R. E.;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2021
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Søren Hansen; Karl Damkjær Hansen;
    Publisher: ACM
    Country: Denmark

    This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment. This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Morten Borg; Torben Hansen; Nanna Weigelt; Torben Riis; Anders Løkke;
    Country: Denmark

    Historically, lung cancer was often diagnosed in an advanced state and patients were seldom candidates for lung resection. With the increase use of CT, lung cancer is more often diagnosed at and early state and resection rates have increased. As a result, lung cancer survival has improved. However, more patients now live with sequelae of thoracic surgery. There is no optimal method of follow-up and surveillance after lung cancer resection. In Denmark, patients are monitored for five years with CT scans and regular outpatient visit at either the Department of Respiratory Diseases or Department of Oncology.In this study 50 patients were seen 3 months following lung cancer resection in the Department of Respiratory Diseases. They filled out a quality of life questionnaire focusing on physical and mental issues following lung cancer investigation and operation. They performed a spirometry and inhalation medicine and tobacco use was recorded.The majority of patients had physical symptoms (86%), main complaints were shortness of breath, fatigue, cough and weight loss. On the contrary, only 38% of patients had mental complaints at follow-up, the main issue being emotional distress (34%). Only 22% of patients used inhalation medicine (SABA, LABA or LAMA), despite the fact that 48% was obstructive on spirometry and mean mMRC score was 1. 14% of patients were active smokers while 46% had smoked during the past 12 months.The majority of patients presented with physical symptoms, while a minority had mental problems after lung cancer resection. Hence, the outpatient visits should focus on physical issues, rehabilitation, smoking cessation and prescription of inhalation medicine; while screening for patients with mental problems.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 1630.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session “Respiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" era”.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Attauabi, M.; Dahlerup, J. F.; Poulsen, A.; Hansen, M. Rosager; Vester-Andersen, M. K.; Eraslan, S.; Prahm, A. P.; Pedersen, N.; Larsen, L.; Jess, T.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Attauabi, M.; Dahlerup, J. F.; Poulsen, A.; Hansen, M. R.; Vester-Andersen, M. K.; Eraslan, S.; Prahm, A. P.; Pedersen, N.; Larsen, L.; Jess, T.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Ulla Møller Weinreich; Rina Juel Kaptajn; Tina Helle;
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    Background: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) impairs patients’ activity of daily living (ADL) and increases dependence on help from others; home care service, private household service, relatives, friends and neighbors.Aim: To describe the magnitude of the need for help in terms of who provides the help, how much time is used on help and help to which ADLs.Methods: One hundred patients (n=100) living with COPD as their primary diagnosis, living in ordinary housing, in the age of 50+ participated in this descriptive, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey addressing the need for help and assistance.Results: Baseline characteristics: 36% male, 64% female, mean age 71 years old (±10), mean FEV1% 69 (±14), 42% lived alone. ADL-I demonstrated that patients indicated need of help for cleaning (70%); home maintenance (36%); personal care (33%), of those 12% for bathing and 7% for getting dressed; shopping (31%) and laundry (14%). Patients received help from relatives (52%), private housekeeping (26%) and home care service (22%). The help from relatives was the most prevalent help on a daily basis: 21.3% of patients received help once or several times per day, whereas home service primarily was provided every fortnight (24%).Conclusion: In COPD even patients with mild lung function are dependent on and need help for daily activities. Help from relatives should not be underestimated, since they are the main caregivers. Yet, this is critical as almost half of this population live alone.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 955.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session “Respiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" era”.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).