Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
37 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Closed Access
  • Conference object
  • DK
  • COVID-19

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Glintborg, B.; Jensen, D. V.; Engel, S.; Terslev, L.; Jensen, M. Pfeiffer; Hendricks, O.; Ostergaard, M.; Rasmussen, S. H.; Adelsten, T.; Danebod, K.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Louise Redder; Sören Möller; Mary Ellen Jarden; Cl, Andersen; Henrik Frederiksen; Henrik Gregersen; Anja Klostergaard; Morten Saaby Steffensen; Per Trøllund Pedersen; Maja Hinge; +6 more
    Publisher: Danish Comprehensive Cancer Center
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Henning Jørgensen;
    Country: Denmark

    Activation has no real answer to the new challenges in the labour market after covid-19 and new efforts are to be foreseen.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shulzhenko, Elena; Secchi, Davide; Senderovitz, Martin; Hansen, Kristian Rune; van Bakel, Marian;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Olesen, T. W.; Tyler, P. D.; Lassen, A. T.; Shapiro I, N.; Burke, R. C.; Wolfe, R. E.;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2021
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Søren Hansen; Karl Damkjær Hansen;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery
    Country: Denmark

    This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment. This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Hugo Garcia Tonioli Defendi; Leonardo Santiago;
    Publisher: IEEE

    In this paper, we focus on the development and manufacturing of a vaccine to combat the COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccine has been considered by many specialists as the best strategy to face the pandemic. Developing a safe and effective vaccine to combat COVID-19 in a timely manner is as daunting as scaling-up manufacturing to produce billions of doses. To accomplish such a goal, pharmaceutical companies have to prepare themselves in terms of infrastructure to ramp-up production as quickly as possible. One potential alternative to do that is to build a network of manufacturing partners. We consider the question of how to speed up technology transfer to ramp-up production under time pressure. We explore the main factors that enact the execution of technology transfer, with particular focus on the managerial and strategic dimensions to support a swift vaccine technology transfer. We conduct an in-depth case study between a multinational pharmaceutical industry and a research and production institute, located in an emerging country. In spite of the present paper still being an ongoing research, we believe our results already shed light on how to prepare for the effective fight against pandemics that may arise in the future.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Simon Hansen; H. Bjarke Vaegter; Morten Høgh; Søren Thorgaard Skou; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Kristian Kjær Petersen;
    Country: Denmark

    Purpose: Exercise therapy in combination with education is recommended as first-line treatment for painful knee osteoarthritis (KOA). In clinical practice, supervised exercise therapy and education demonstrate approx. 25% pain relief following an 8-week treatment program. Studies indicate that some patients with KOA experience larger pain relief compared to others. Assessments of peripheral and central pain mechanisms has been used to predict responders and non-responders to treatment. Studies on surgery and treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with KOA have indicated that patients with higher levels of pain sensitivity might respond less positive. The primary aim of this observational study was to investigative if measures of pre-treatment pain sensitivity was associated with clinical outcomes after supervised exercise therapy and education. Methods: Patients with painful KOA (numeric rating scale [NRS, 0-10] ≥ 3) were included, and examined before and 1-2 weeks after 6-8 weeks of supervised exercise therapy (2 sessions of 1 hour per week) and 2 sessions of patient education. Handheld pressure pain threshold (PPT) was assessed locally at the most painful knee at 4 peripatellar sites (knee) and at two remote sites at the m. tibialis anterior (TA) and the contralateral m. extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL). Further, computer-controlled cuff algometry at the lower leg with the most intense knee pain was used to assess pain detection threshold (cPDT), pain tolerance threshold (cPTT) and conditioned pain modulation (cCPM). Peak pain intensity within the last 24 hours (NRS, 0-10), PainDetect questionnaire (PDQ, 0-38) and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were assessed as clinical measures. PDQ assesses the pain phenotype with a score ≤ 12 indicating probably nociceptive pain, 13-18 uncertain pain phenotype and ≥ 19 probably neuropathic pain. KOOS4 was defined as the average score of the subscale scores for Pain, Symptoms, Activity of Daily Living and Quality of Life (0-100 with 0 indicating extreme problems and 100 indicating no problems). Physical performance was assessed using the 40-meter walk test (40MWT). A treatment attendance score (%) was calculated for each patient by dividing the number of sessions attended by the number of sessions scheduled (twice per week). This study was approved by the local ethical committee (N-20190045) and pre-registered at (NCT04123756). All participants gave oral and written informed consent prior to enrollment. Results: This interim analysis reports on the first patients recruited for this observational study. Eleven KOA patients (6 women) with mean peak pain intensity of 6.0 ± 1.5, median pain duration 17.0 months (range: 5-120) and body mass index of 30.3 ± 5.7 were included in this interim analysis. In one subject, follow-up was made by telephone due to the COVID-19 situation, leaving 10 subject for the analysis on changes in pain sensitivity measures. Attendance score was 98.1 ± 18.1% during 7.1 ± 0.7 weeks. Following treatment, improvements were observed in KOOS4 (57.1 ± 10.0 at baseline vs. 65.3 ± 13.1 at follow-up, P 0.15). Pre-treatment cPDT (rs 0.05). Conclusions: These results indicate that patients with higher pre-treatment pressure pain sensitivity have worse KOOS4 scores following supervised exercise therapy and education.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Niels Jacobsen; Pia Iben Pietersen; Christian Pállson Nolsøe; Lars Konge; Ole Graumann; Christian B. Laursen;
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is utilized in an increasing array of medical fields, including respiratory medicine. However, the technique is still relatively new and only sporadically mentioned in current guidelines and recommendations.Aims and Objective: The aim of this systematic review is to provide a literature overview and critical appraisal of the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced thoracic ultrasound (CETUS).Methods: A systematic literature search using major electronic databases and in accordance with PRISMA guidelines was performed. Studies with primary focus of CETUS of thoracic disorders compared to standard reference test were included. The QUADAS-2 tool was used for quality assessment of the studies.Results: The search identified 43 articles. One randomized controlled study, six non-randomized controlled studies, 16 non-randomized non-controlled studies, five case series, 10 single case reports, and five animal studies. The risk of bias was overall judged high. The most frequent clinical application of CETUS was guidance during biopsy procedures. Six studies compared CETUS-guided vs. ultrasound-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of thoracic masses. CETUS-guidance increased the diagnostic accuracy by 14.6 percentage points on average, but the studies were too heterogeneous for meta-analysis.Conclusions: The current literature of CETUS is overall heterogeneous with few high evidence level studies, small study populations and high risk of bias. CETUS-guided biopsy is the most frequent clinical application and increases diagnostic accuracy compared to ultrasound-guidance.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 2785.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session textquotedblleftRespiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" eratextquotedblright.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Karin Rosenkilde Laursen; Jakob Hjort Bønløkke; Merete Bilde; Marianne Glasius; Elisabeth Bendstrup; Søren K. Kjærgaard; Anna-Carin Olin; Torben Sigsgaard;
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    Background: E-cigarette use is dramatically increasing and often permitted in smoke-free areas causing passive vape exposure. Little is known about potential adverse health effects of passive vape and people with respiratory diseases may be more susceptible. Our aim was to investigate local and systemic effects of short-term passive exposure to vape among patients with mild or moderate COPD.Methods: In a randomised double-blinded crossover study non-smoking COPD patients were exposed for four hours at two different exposure conditions separated by 14 days; A) clean filtered air (particles concentration <6 µg/m3) and B) passive vaping (median: 18 µg/m3 (range: 8-333)). E-cigarette users in an adjacent chamber were vaping in situation B and vape-polluted air was passed to the exposure chamber. Health effects including FEV1/FVC, FeNO, Surfactant Protein-A (SP-A) in Particles in Exhaled Air (PExA) and plasma biomarkers were evaluated before, after, and 24 h. after exposures.Results: 16 patients (mean age 68) participated. Exposure to passive vape did not alter FEV1/FVC or FeNO. SP-A in exhaled air was negatively affected by time and exposure to vape, and some plasma biomarkers (citrate, phospholipids and free cholesterol in very large HDL plus triglycerides in medium HDL) increased significantly after exposure to vape alone.Conclusions: At the exposure levels in the study, SP-A in exhaled particles, citrate and some plasma biomarkers in patients with COPD were affected by passive vaping indicating inflammation and atherogene activity. We recommend that passive vape exposure should be further studied.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 4387.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session “Respiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" era”.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
37 Research products, page 1 of 4
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Glintborg, B.; Jensen, D. V.; Engel, S.; Terslev, L.; Jensen, M. Pfeiffer; Hendricks, O.; Ostergaard, M.; Rasmussen, S. H.; Adelsten, T.; Danebod, K.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Louise Redder; Sören Möller; Mary Ellen Jarden; Cl, Andersen; Henrik Frederiksen; Henrik Gregersen; Anja Klostergaard; Morten Saaby Steffensen; Per Trøllund Pedersen; Maja Hinge; +6 more
    Publisher: Danish Comprehensive Cancer Center
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Henning Jørgensen;
    Country: Denmark

    Activation has no real answer to the new challenges in the labour market after covid-19 and new efforts are to be foreseen.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shulzhenko, Elena; Secchi, Davide; Senderovitz, Martin; Hansen, Kristian Rune; van Bakel, Marian;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Olesen, T. W.; Tyler, P. D.; Lassen, A. T.; Shapiro I, N.; Burke, R. C.; Wolfe, R. E.;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2021
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Søren Hansen; Karl Damkjær Hansen;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery
    Country: Denmark

    This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment. This demo is the result of a two-day evaluation of a humanoid robot in a Danish citizens service centre. Due to COVID-19, the goal was to reduce the number of personal contacts between staff and visitors in the centre using verbal interaction with the robot. The robot was pre-programmed with a number of typical questions and answers related to the center. A total of 263 citizens attended the centre during the two days. Visitors would have to pass the robot to enter the center, and is was estimated that 5 percent of the visitors interacted with the robot. The most common interaction patterns were greetings and casual chatting, although questions about the facilities at the centre were also observed. However, most visitors ignored the robot and focused on their scheduled appointment.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Hugo Garcia Tonioli Defendi; Leonardo Santiago;
    Publisher: IEEE

    In this paper, we focus on the development and manufacturing of a vaccine to combat the COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccine has been considered by many specialists as the best strategy to face the pandemic. Developing a safe and effective vaccine to combat COVID-19 in a timely manner is as daunting as scaling-up manufacturing to produce billions of doses. To accomplish such a goal, pharmaceutical companies have to prepare themselves in terms of infrastructure to ramp-up production as quickly as possible. One potential alternative to do that is to build a network of manufacturing partners. We consider the question of how to speed up technology transfer to ramp-up production under time pressure. We explore the main factors that enact the execution of technology transfer, with particular focus on the managerial and strategic dimensions to support a swift vaccine technology transfer. We conduct an in-depth case study between a multinational pharmaceutical industry and a research and production institute, located in an emerging country. In spite of the present paper still being an ongoing research, we believe our results already shed light on how to prepare for the effective fight against pandemics that may arise in the future.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Simon Hansen; H. Bjarke Vaegter; Morten Høgh; Søren Thorgaard Skou; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Kristian Kjær Petersen;
    Country: Denmark

    Purpose: Exercise therapy in combination with education is recommended as first-line treatment for painful knee osteoarthritis (KOA). In clinical practice, supervised exercise therapy and education demonstrate approx. 25% pain relief following an 8-week treatment program. Studies indicate that some patients with KOA experience larger pain relief compared to others. Assessments of peripheral and central pain mechanisms has been used to predict responders and non-responders to treatment. Studies on surgery and treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with KOA have indicated that patients with higher levels of pain sensitivity might respond less positive. The primary aim of this observational study was to investigative if measures of pre-treatment pain sensitivity was associated with clinical outcomes after supervised exercise therapy and education. Methods: Patients with painful KOA (numeric rating scale [NRS, 0-10] ≥ 3) were included, and examined before and 1-2 weeks after 6-8 weeks of supervised exercise therapy (2 sessions of 1 hour per week) and 2 sessions of patient education. Handheld pressure pain threshold (PPT) was assessed locally at the most painful knee at 4 peripatellar sites (knee) and at two remote sites at the m. tibialis anterior (TA) and the contralateral m. extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL). Further, computer-controlled cuff algometry at the lower leg with the most intense knee pain was used to assess pain detection threshold (cPDT), pain tolerance threshold (cPTT) and conditioned pain modulation (cCPM). Peak pain intensity within the last 24 hours (NRS, 0-10), PainDetect questionnaire (PDQ, 0-38) and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were assessed as clinical measures. PDQ assesses the pain phenotype with a score ≤ 12 indicating probably nociceptive pain, 13-18 uncertain pain phenotype and ≥ 19 probably neuropathic pain. KOOS4 was defined as the average score of the subscale scores for Pain, Symptoms, Activity of Daily Living and Quality of Life (0-100 with 0 indicating extreme problems and 100 indicating no problems). Physical performance was assessed using the 40-meter walk test (40MWT). A treatment attendance score (%) was calculated for each patient by dividing the number of sessions attended by the number of sessions scheduled (twice per week). This study was approved by the local ethical committee (N-20190045) and pre-registered at (NCT04123756). All participants gave oral and written informed consent prior to enrollment. Results: This interim analysis reports on the first patients recruited for this observational study. Eleven KOA patients (6 women) with mean peak pain intensity of 6.0 ± 1.5, median pain duration 17.0 months (range: 5-120) and body mass index of 30.3 ± 5.7 were included in this interim analysis. In one subject, follow-up was made by telephone due to the COVID-19 situation, leaving 10 subject for the analysis on changes in pain sensitivity measures. Attendance score was 98.1 ± 18.1% during 7.1 ± 0.7 weeks. Following treatment, improvements were observed in KOOS4 (57.1 ± 10.0 at baseline vs. 65.3 ± 13.1 at follow-up, P 0.15). Pre-treatment cPDT (rs 0.05). Conclusions: These results indicate that patients with higher pre-treatment pressure pain sensitivity have worse KOOS4 scores following supervised exercise therapy and education.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Niels Jacobsen; Pia Iben Pietersen; Christian Pállson Nolsøe; Lars Konge; Ole Graumann; Christian B. Laursen;
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is utilized in an increasing array of medical fields, including respiratory medicine. However, the technique is still relatively new and only sporadically mentioned in current guidelines and recommendations.Aims and Objective: The aim of this systematic review is to provide a literature overview and critical appraisal of the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced thoracic ultrasound (CETUS).Methods: A systematic literature search using major electronic databases and in accordance with PRISMA guidelines was performed. Studies with primary focus of CETUS of thoracic disorders compared to standard reference test were included. The QUADAS-2 tool was used for quality assessment of the studies.Results: The search identified 43 articles. One randomized controlled study, six non-randomized controlled studies, 16 non-randomized non-controlled studies, five case series, 10 single case reports, and five animal studies. The risk of bias was overall judged high. The most frequent clinical application of CETUS was guidance during biopsy procedures. Six studies compared CETUS-guided vs. ultrasound-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of thoracic masses. CETUS-guidance increased the diagnostic accuracy by 14.6 percentage points on average, but the studies were too heterogeneous for meta-analysis.Conclusions: The current literature of CETUS is overall heterogeneous with few high evidence level studies, small study populations and high risk of bias. CETUS-guided biopsy is the most frequent clinical application and increases diagnostic accuracy compared to ultrasound-guidance.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 2785.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session textquotedblleftRespiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" eratextquotedblright.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Karin Rosenkilde Laursen; Jakob Hjort Bønløkke; Merete Bilde; Marianne Glasius; Elisabeth Bendstrup; Søren K. Kjærgaard; Anna-Carin Olin; Torben Sigsgaard;
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    Background: E-cigarette use is dramatically increasing and often permitted in smoke-free areas causing passive vape exposure. Little is known about potential adverse health effects of passive vape and people with respiratory diseases may be more susceptible. Our aim was to investigate local and systemic effects of short-term passive exposure to vape among patients with mild or moderate COPD.Methods: In a randomised double-blinded crossover study non-smoking COPD patients were exposed for four hours at two different exposure conditions separated by 14 days; A) clean filtered air (particles concentration <6 µg/m3) and B) passive vaping (median: 18 µg/m3 (range: 8-333)). E-cigarette users in an adjacent chamber were vaping in situation B and vape-polluted air was passed to the exposure chamber. Health effects including FEV1/FVC, FeNO, Surfactant Protein-A (SP-A) in Particles in Exhaled Air (PExA) and plasma biomarkers were evaluated before, after, and 24 h. after exposures.Results: 16 patients (mean age 68) participated. Exposure to passive vape did not alter FEV1/FVC or FeNO. SP-A in exhaled air was negatively affected by time and exposure to vape, and some plasma biomarkers (citrate, phospholipids and free cholesterol in very large HDL plus triglycerides in medium HDL) increased significantly after exposure to vape alone.Conclusions: At the exposure levels in the study, SP-A in exhaled particles, citrate and some plasma biomarkers in patients with COPD were affected by passive vaping indicating inflammation and atherogene activity. We recommend that passive vape exposure should be further studied.FootnotesCite this article as: European Respiratory Journal 2020; 56: Suppl. 64, 4387.This abstract was presented at the 2020 ERS International Congress, in session “Respiratory viruses in the "pre COVID-19" era”.This is an ERS International Congress abstract. No full-text version is available. Further material to accompany this abstract may be available at www.ers-education.org (ERS member access only).