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699 Research products, page 1 of 70

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  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Wunsch, Natasha;
    Countries: United Kingdom, France, France

    contribution à un site web; Several countries in the Western Balkans have responded to the Covid-19 outbreak with draconian measures that entail a further erosion of democracy, writes Natasha Wunsch. She argues the pandemic is shining a spotlight on the impact of geopolitical competition in the Western Balkans, where authoritarian forces are undermining the EU’s democracy promotion efforts.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Bear, Laura; Simpson, Nikita; Angland, Michael; Bhogal, Jaskiran K.; Bowers, Rebecca; Cannell, Fenella; Gardner, Katy; Lohiya, Anishka; James, Deborah; Jivraj, Naseem; +8 more
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Dealing with death and bereavement in the context of the Covid-19 Pandemic will present significant challenges for at least the next three months. The current situation does not allow for families andbcommunities to be involved in the process of death in ways in which they would normally hope or expect to be. In addition, mortality rates will disproportionately affect vulnerable households. The government has identified the following communities as being at increased risk: single parent households; multi-generational Black and Minority Ethnic groups; men without degrees in lone households and/or in precarious work; small family business owners in their 50s; and elderlyhouseholds. Our study focused on these groups. This report presents a summary of findings and key recommendations by a team of anthropologists from the London School of Economics who conducted a public survey and 58 cross-community interviews between 3 and 9 April 2020. It explores ways to prepare these communities and households for impending deaths with communications and policy support. More information on the research methodology, data protection and ethical procedures is available in Appendix 1. A summary of relevant existing research can be found in Appendix 2. A list of key contacts across communities for consultation is available on request. Research was focused on “what a good death looks like” for people across all faiths and for vulnerable groups. It examined how communities were already adapting how they dealt with processes of dying, burials, funerals and bereavement during the pandemic, and responding to new government regulations. It specifically focused on five transitions in the process of death, and what consultation processes, policies and communications strategies could be mobilised to support communities through these phases.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Layard, Richard; Clark, Andrew E.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Krekel, Christian; Fancourt, Daisy; Hey, Nancy; O'Donnell, Gus;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    In choosing when to end the lockdown, policy-makers have to balance the impact of the decision upon incomes, unemployment, mental health, public confidence and many other factors, as well as (of course) upon the number of deaths from COVID-19. To facilitate the decision it is helpful to forecast each factor using a single metric. We use as our metric the number of Wellbeing-Years resulting from each date of ending the lockdown. This new metric makes it possible to compare the impact of each factor in a way that is relevant to all public policy decisions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reeves, A; McKee, M; Mackenbach, J; Whitehead, M; Stuckler, D;
    Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
    Countries: United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, Netherlands, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | DEMETRIQ (278511), WT

    BACKGROUND: Since the onset of the Great Recession in Europe, unmet need for medical care has been increasing, especially in persons aged 65 or older. It is possible that public pensions buffer access to healthcare in older persons during times of economic crisis, but to our knowledge, this has not been tested empirically in Europe. METHODS: We integrated panel data on 16 European countries for years 2004-2010 with indicators of public pension, unemployment insurance and sickness insurance entitlement from the Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset and unmet need (due to cost) prevalence rates from EuroStat 2014 edition. Using country-level fixed-effects regression models, we evaluate whether greater public pension entitlement, which helps reduce old-age poverty, reduces the prevalence of unmet medical need in older persons and whether it reduces inequalities in unmet medical need across the income distribution. RESULTS: We found that each 1-unit increase in public pension entitlement is associated with a 1.11 percentage-point decline in unmet medical need due to cost among over 65s (95% CI -0.55 to -1.66). This association is strongest for the lowest income quintile (1.65 percentage points, 95% CI -1.19 to -2.10). Importantly, we found consistent evidence that out-of-pocket payments were linked with greater unmet needs, but that this association was mitigated by greater public pension entitlement (β=-1.21 percentage points, 95% CI -0.37 to -2.06). CONCLUSIONS: Greater public pension entitlement plays a crucial role in reducing inequalities in unmet medical need among older persons, especially in healthcare systems which rely heavily on out-of-pocket payments.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hamilton, Alexander;
    Publisher: LSE Middle East Centre
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper examines the fiscal and economic implications of Iraq’s current demographic trajectory. We find that, given Iraq’s almost total dependence on oil for government revenues, slight changes in the demographic transition rate could result in significant cumulative per capita expenditure changes- equivalent to $2.9bn, or approximately 7% of the current health budget, 9% of the current defence budget, or 17% of current aid flows. Furthermore, evidence from the entire Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, suggests that Iraq’s relatively slow demographic transition is reducing per capita economic growth, especially as it is combined with a hostile business environment. Specifically, using a panel dataset, we find that the interactive effect of a 1% decrease in the dependency ratio and a 1% decrease in the unit costs of starting and running a business could add, on average, 1.2% to GDP per capita in a typical MENA country. Therefore, investing in Iraq’s demographic transition could potentially yield significant economic returns. This is especially pertinent if the COVID-19 induced recession results in a significant increase in the budget deficit. As reducing demographic momentum will be equivalent to a per capita increase in resources available for basic services. Evidence from other MENA countries, especially neighbouring Iran, suggests that interventions that support a faster demographic transition, by promoting reproductive rights, are feasible to implement and could, therefore, have quite a profound effect on future economic growth.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Timothy Besley; Nicholas Stern;
    Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Inc.
    Country: United Kingdom

    Abstract In this paper, we suggest an approach to analysing policies relating to the COVID‐19 pandemic. We discuss the formulation of policy and sketch how the approach can be applied to different specific challenges as policymakers try to make difficult choices for managing the pandemic and protecting the economy and society.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Bhalotia, Shania; Dhingra, Swati; Kondirolli, Fjola;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has decimated livelihoods in urban India and created a new underclass of workers who are being pushed into poverty. Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli (LSE) say a national work guarantee is needed to prevent mass long-term unemployment and poverty.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Anson, Ian; Kane, John;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Last week President Trump signed an unprecedented $2 trillion stimulus bill aimed at protecting workers and businesses threatened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Perhaps equally surprising was the relative lack of opposition from Republicans, who at other times are opposed to increased government spending and growing deficits. Drawing on their work on how party-supporters feel about budget deficits and how the media reports on them, Ian G. Anson and John V. Kane write that these supporters are less concerned about deficits when a president from their own party holds the White House. The role of conservative media, they comment, means that this effect is especially stark for a Republican president like Donald Trump.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Gift, Thomas;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    This past weekend, on the eve of Independence Day celebrations, President Trump took a divisive tone by attacking his opponents on the left. In this Q&A, Thomas Gift writes that Trump’s poor polling against his Democratic presidential challenger, former Vice President Joe Biden, and the ongoing criticisms of his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, mean that he is likely to continue to hit out at opponents to galvanize his political base ahead of the election.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Donadelli, Flavia;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    An underlying assumption of modern political states is that they are rational systems that ‘follow the science’ to achieve optimal outcomes for their citizens. Whilst COVID-19 continues to foreground the strengths and weaknesses of different national scientific advice systems, Flavia Donadelli draws on evidence from Brazilian policymaking to argue that evidence informed policymaking is a far more ephemeral process and heavily dependent on institutional and political contexts for it to operate effectively.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
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Searching FieldsTerms
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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
699 Research products, page 1 of 70
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Wunsch, Natasha;
    Countries: United Kingdom, France, France

    contribution à un site web; Several countries in the Western Balkans have responded to the Covid-19 outbreak with draconian measures that entail a further erosion of democracy, writes Natasha Wunsch. She argues the pandemic is shining a spotlight on the impact of geopolitical competition in the Western Balkans, where authoritarian forces are undermining the EU’s democracy promotion efforts.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Bear, Laura; Simpson, Nikita; Angland, Michael; Bhogal, Jaskiran K.; Bowers, Rebecca; Cannell, Fenella; Gardner, Katy; Lohiya, Anishka; James, Deborah; Jivraj, Naseem; +8 more
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Dealing with death and bereavement in the context of the Covid-19 Pandemic will present significant challenges for at least the next three months. The current situation does not allow for families andbcommunities to be involved in the process of death in ways in which they would normally hope or expect to be. In addition, mortality rates will disproportionately affect vulnerable households. The government has identified the following communities as being at increased risk: single parent households; multi-generational Black and Minority Ethnic groups; men without degrees in lone households and/or in precarious work; small family business owners in their 50s; and elderlyhouseholds. Our study focused on these groups. This report presents a summary of findings and key recommendations by a team of anthropologists from the London School of Economics who conducted a public survey and 58 cross-community interviews between 3 and 9 April 2020. It explores ways to prepare these communities and households for impending deaths with communications and policy support. More information on the research methodology, data protection and ethical procedures is available in Appendix 1. A summary of relevant existing research can be found in Appendix 2. A list of key contacts across communities for consultation is available on request. Research was focused on “what a good death looks like” for people across all faiths and for vulnerable groups. It examined how communities were already adapting how they dealt with processes of dying, burials, funerals and bereavement during the pandemic, and responding to new government regulations. It specifically focused on five transitions in the process of death, and what consultation processes, policies and communications strategies could be mobilised to support communities through these phases.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Layard, Richard; Clark, Andrew E.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Krekel, Christian; Fancourt, Daisy; Hey, Nancy; O'Donnell, Gus;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    In choosing when to end the lockdown, policy-makers have to balance the impact of the decision upon incomes, unemployment, mental health, public confidence and many other factors, as well as (of course) upon the number of deaths from COVID-19. To facilitate the decision it is helpful to forecast each factor using a single metric. We use as our metric the number of Wellbeing-Years resulting from each date of ending the lockdown. This new metric makes it possible to compare the impact of each factor in a way that is relevant to all public policy decisions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reeves, A; McKee, M; Mackenbach, J; Whitehead, M; Stuckler, D;
    Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
    Countries: United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, Netherlands, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | DEMETRIQ (278511), WT

    BACKGROUND: Since the onset of the Great Recession in Europe, unmet need for medical care has been increasing, especially in persons aged 65 or older. It is possible that public pensions buffer access to healthcare in older persons during times of economic crisis, but to our knowledge, this has not been tested empirically in Europe. METHODS: We integrated panel data on 16 European countries for years 2004-2010 with indicators of public pension, unemployment insurance and sickness insurance entitlement from the Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset and unmet need (due to cost) prevalence rates from EuroStat 2014 edition. Using country-level fixed-effects regression models, we evaluate whether greater public pension entitlement, which helps reduce old-age poverty, reduces the prevalence of unmet medical need in older persons and whether it reduces inequalities in unmet medical need across the income distribution. RESULTS: We found that each 1-unit increase in public pension entitlement is associated with a 1.11 percentage-point decline in unmet medical need due to cost among over 65s (95% CI -0.55 to -1.66). This association is strongest for the lowest income quintile (1.65 percentage points, 95% CI -1.19 to -2.10). Importantly, we found consistent evidence that out-of-pocket payments were linked with greater unmet needs, but that this association was mitigated by greater public pension entitlement (β=-1.21 percentage points, 95% CI -0.37 to -2.06). CONCLUSIONS: Greater public pension entitlement plays a crucial role in reducing inequalities in unmet medical need among older persons, especially in healthcare systems which rely heavily on out-of-pocket payments.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hamilton, Alexander;
    Publisher: LSE Middle East Centre
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper examines the fiscal and economic implications of Iraq’s current demographic trajectory. We find that, given Iraq’s almost total dependence on oil for government revenues, slight changes in the demographic transition rate could result in significant cumulative per capita expenditure changes- equivalent to $2.9bn, or approximately 7% of the current health budget, 9% of the current defence budget, or 17% of current aid flows. Furthermore, evidence from the entire Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, suggests that Iraq’s relatively slow demographic transition is reducing per capita economic growth, especially as it is combined with a hostile business environment. Specifically, using a panel dataset, we find that the interactive effect of a 1% decrease in the dependency ratio and a 1% decrease in the unit costs of starting and running a business could add, on average, 1.2% to GDP per capita in a typical MENA country. Therefore, investing in Iraq’s demographic transition could potentially yield significant economic returns. This is especially pertinent if the COVID-19 induced recession results in a significant increase in the budget deficit. As reducing demographic momentum will be equivalent to a per capita increase in resources available for basic services. Evidence from other MENA countries, especially neighbouring Iran, suggests that interventions that support a faster demographic transition, by promoting reproductive rights, are feasible to implement and could, therefore, have quite a profound effect on future economic growth.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Timothy Besley; Nicholas Stern;
    Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Inc.
    Country: United Kingdom

    Abstract In this paper, we suggest an approach to analysing policies relating to the COVID‐19 pandemic. We discuss the formulation of policy and sketch how the approach can be applied to different specific challenges as policymakers try to make difficult choices for managing the pandemic and protecting the economy and society.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Bhalotia, Shania; Dhingra, Swati; Kondirolli, Fjola;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has decimated livelihoods in urban India and created a new underclass of workers who are being pushed into poverty. Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli (LSE) say a national work guarantee is needed to prevent mass long-term unemployment and poverty.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Anson, Ian; Kane, John;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Last week President Trump signed an unprecedented $2 trillion stimulus bill aimed at protecting workers and businesses threatened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Perhaps equally surprising was the relative lack of opposition from Republicans, who at other times are opposed to increased government spending and growing deficits. Drawing on their work on how party-supporters feel about budget deficits and how the media reports on them, Ian G. Anson and John V. Kane write that these supporters are less concerned about deficits when a president from their own party holds the White House. The role of conservative media, they comment, means that this effect is especially stark for a Republican president like Donald Trump.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Gift, Thomas;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    This past weekend, on the eve of Independence Day celebrations, President Trump took a divisive tone by attacking his opponents on the left. In this Q&A, Thomas Gift writes that Trump’s poor polling against his Democratic presidential challenger, former Vice President Joe Biden, and the ongoing criticisms of his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, mean that he is likely to continue to hit out at opponents to galvanize his political base ahead of the election.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Donadelli, Flavia;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    An underlying assumption of modern political states is that they are rational systems that ‘follow the science’ to achieve optimal outcomes for their citizens. Whilst COVID-19 continues to foreground the strengths and weaknesses of different national scientific advice systems, Flavia Donadelli draws on evidence from Brazilian policymaking to argue that evidence informed policymaking is a far more ephemeral process and heavily dependent on institutional and political contexts for it to operate effectively.