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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
181 Research products, page 1 of 19

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
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  • 2018-2022
  • Conference object
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  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Birgith Pedersen; Birgitte Lerbæk; Lone Jørgensen; Helle Haslund-Thomsen; Charlotte Brun Thorup; Maja Thomsen Albrechtsen; Sara Jacobsen; Marie Germund Nielsen; Kathrine Hoffmann Kusk; Britt Laugesen; +3 more
    Country: Denmark

    COVID-19 restrictions prevented relatives from visiting and accompanying patients to hospital and required that nurses wore personal protective equipment. These changes affected patients’ relationships with relatives and challenged their ability to connect with nurses. Individual, semi-structured interviews with 15 patients were carried out to explore patients’ experiences of their relationships with relatives and their collaboration with nurses during in- and outpatient contacts in non-COVID-19 hospital wards. The analysis of data was guided by phenomenological hermeneutic frame of reference and the study was reported according to the COREQ checklist. The findings illustrated that patients felt lonely and insecure when separated from relatives, caught between relatives and professionals during information exchange, and experienced the absence of relatives as both beneficial and burdening. Visitor restrictions provided patients with time to heal but prevented provision of informal care. Patients had to take responsibility for maintaining contact with relatives independent of their health condition. COVID-19 restrictions created distance with nurses, which potentially led to insufficient physical and psychosocial care.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Stender, Marie; Nordberg, Lene Wiell;
    Country: Denmark

    Covid19 was not equally distributed among neighbourhoods in Denmark – the disadvantaged neighbourhoods on the Government’s so-called ‘parallel society list’ was recurrently pointed out as ‘Corona ghettos’ with high levels of infection and long-term lock-downs. Media and politicians were especially concerned with how people in such neighbourhoods live in crowded homes or have deviant cultural norms and social conventions, hence contesting their ways of residing and living. Yet researchers have argued that the high infection rates also had to do with the fact that residents in these areas mainly have jobs in the service industry and cannot work from home. Based on architectural-anthropological fieldwork in a range of disadvantaged neighbourhoods during and after the pandemic, this paper focuses on how the Covid19 lock-down was experienced from within: How did people handle being stuck within the boundaries of the home, and what was the impact of the pandemic on the stigmatization, density and social infrastructure of these neighbourhoods? The study presents findings on different levels: First of all, we need to question prevalent notions of the home as a shelter and safe haven. For many people not least vulnerable groups, pandemic stuckness (Steiner & Veel 2021) at home was a frustrating or even tragic experience. Second, the pandemic demonstrated that home is not necessarily delimited by the four walls of the house. In the disadvantaged neighbourhoods many residents have social relations outside Denmark, and during the pandemic, they were not just stuck behind domestic boundaries, but also national boundaries. However, as other places, the pandemic also paved way for new community activities and practical help among neighbours, rendering visible valuable social infrastructure that may remain unnoticed in pre- and post-pandemic times.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Björn Thór Jónsson; Magda Pischetola; Nanna Inie; Mats Daniels; Claus Brabrand;
    Country: Denmark

    We present a long-term study of how university students experienced teaching/learning activities throughout the Covid-19 pandemic in Denmark1. We collected data through questionnaires from N=365 students enrolled in the “Intro- duction to Database Systems” course during four consecutive semesters (Spring 2020 to Fall 2021). The two years span the entire period of the pandemic’s interruption of normal on-site teaching, until restrictions were completely lifted in Denmark. The study investigates student preferences for online versus on- site teaching, and identifies the advantages of both, as well as changes in preferences throughout the pandemic. Quantitatively, the results demonstrate a preference for on-site over online teaching which was more pronounced for exercise classes than for lectures. Qualitatively, the study identifies several advantages of both online and on-site teaching; including a more engaging learning environment and better teacher-student interaction for on-site lectures, and flexibility and self-paced learning for online teaching. The primary changes identified were an increased sense of being able to focus online and a decrease in ease of asking questions online towards the later stages of the pandemic. Finally, we highlight the opportunity for universities to provide hybrid models of teaching, in order to care for diverse student preferences and needs.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Melanie Duckert; Eve Hoggan; Louise Barkhuus; Pernille Bjørn; Nina Boulus-Rodje; Susanne Bødker; Naja Holten Møller; Irina Shklovski;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.
    Country: Denmark

    Remote and hybrid work has received significant attention in the last years in both academic and industrial contexts, especially due to the COVID-19 pandemic and attendant lockdown. Some of the remaining challenges in current remote technologies include limited embodiment, hierarchy and agency issues, and significant technological limitations. In this workshop, we will, together with the participants, explore how to design socio-technical systems that connect people and artefacts during collaborative activities. The workshop will use provocations, artefacts, and group work to imagine the futures of work with a focus on hybrid work practices.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nana Ernst Toldam; Christian Graugaard; Rikke Meyer; Louise Thomsen; Sabine Dreier; Emmanuele A. Jannini; Annamaria Giraldi;
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted profoundly on the wellbeing and social interactions of the world population, and all dimensions of sexual health were potentially affected by globally implemented preventive measures. Objectives: The scoping review aimed to compile existing research investigating possible effects of COVID-19 lockdowns on adult sexual health, that is, sexual behavior, functioning, and satisfaction. Further, studies on the interplay between mental health and sexual well-being during the pandemic were reviewed. Methods: The review was conducted in accordance with guidelines established by the Joanna Briggs Institute and the Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) Checklist. On October 11–12, 2021, PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl, Cochrane, Sociological Abstracts and Scopus were systematically searched for relevant peer-reviewed papers employing quantitative methodology. Additionally, unpublished (“grey”) research studies on the subject were retrieved. The screening, data extraction, and analysis of evidence were conducted by 4 independent reviewers using an iterative approach. Results: Based on 107 studies included, the scoping review showed that the pandemic had had a wide impact on all dimensions of sexual health. Except for solo sex activities, mainly negative COVID-19 implications were identified, although findings were, in sum, characterized by complexity and unpredictability. Thus, sexual behavior, functioning, and satisfaction during the pandemic appeared to be mitigated by a broad range of sociodemographic and contextual factors. Finally, sexual health seemed deeply entwined with overall mental health. Conclusion: The scoping review revealed a broad range of COVID-19-related effects on sexual health, including an overall decline in partnered sex and a concurrent increase in solo sex activities. It also emphasized a need for future research to shed light on possible long-term consequences of the pandemic in various population groups and on all aspects of sexual health. Toldam NE, Graugaard C, Meyer R, et al. Sexual Health During COVID-19: A Scoping Review. Sex Med Rev 2022;10:714–753.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Terese L. Katzenstein; Jan Christensen; Thomas Kromann Lund; Anna Kalhauge; Frederikke Rönsholt; Daria Podlekareva; Elisabeth Arndal; Ronan M. G. Berg; Thora Wesenberg Helt; Anne-Mette Lebech; +1 more
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    A large proportion of patients exhibit persistently reduced pulmonary diffusion capacity after COVID-19. It is unknown whether this is due to a post-COVID restrictive lung disease and/or pulmonary vascular disease. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between initial COVID-19 severity and haemoglobin-corrected diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLco) reduction at follow-up. Furthermore, to analyse if DLco reduction could be linked to pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and/or thromboembolic disease within the first months after the illness, a total of 67 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 from March to December 2020 were included across three severity groups: 12 not admitted to hospital (Group I), 40 admitted to hospital without intensive care unit (ICU) admission (Group II), and 15 admitted to hospital with ICU admission (Group III). At first follow-up, 5 months post SARS-CoV-2 positive testing/4 months after discharge, lung function testing, including DLco, high-resolution CT chest scan (HRCT) and ventilation-perfusion (VQ) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT were conducted. DLco was reduced in 42% of the patients; the prevalence and extent depended on the clinical severity group and was typically observed as part of a restrictive pattern with reduced total lung capacity. Reduced DLco was associated with the extent of ground-glass opacification and signs of PF on HRCT, but not with mismatched perfusion defects on VQ SPECT/CT. The severity-dependent decline in DLco observed early after COVID-19 appears to be caused by restrictive and not pulmonary vascular disease.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ebbesen, Brian Duborg; Giordano, Rocco; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Nielsen, Henrik; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Helene Balslev Clausen; Vibeke Andersson;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Conference object . 2022
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Høeg, Emil Rosenlund; Lange, Belinda;
    Country: Denmark

    The COVID-19 pandemic has increased awareness of hygiene and safety associated with Virtual Reality (VR) usage across many domains. Despite the growing need for solutions, the research on cleaning efficacy is severely lacking. To understand the impact of the issue we developed a survey to gather information on the hygiene practices in several domains. Preliminary results indicate that hygiene practices vary, with many practitioners and researchers calling for access to empirically supported best practice guidelines.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Geoffrey Olok Tabo; Lone Dirckinck-Holmfeld; Anne Bygholm;
    Publisher: Commonwealth of Learning
    Country: Denmark

    PCF10 Sub-theme: Inspiring Innovations // We explore the impact of blended learning in higher education as as innovative pedagogy integrating problem-based learning and student-centred learning in teaching and learning, during the Covid-19 pandemic. New information technology tools and applications were experimented in teaching and learning at Gulu University between 2020 and 2021 at the peak of the pandemic. The study used qualitative methods and drew on constructivism where knowledge is co-constructed through interacting systems and actors in higher education environment. It is motivating and inspirational to deploy various methods of teaching and learning during the lockdowns. Inspiring innovation such as zero-rating, MEET tool and blended learning were used to address gaps in teaching and learning in university programmes. Preferences for blended learning grew even if institutions operate in resource constrained settings. // We used online training workshops to train teachers on basic ICT tools for content development and digitisation of teachers’ teaching and learning materials. Our findings indicate that lecturers progressively develop ICT skills, attitudes, and knowledge and innovative practices to teaching and learning using available free online applications and ICT resources at their disposal. Students’ attendance was low because of lack of access to the internet and ownership of computers for blended learning. // Paper ID 5677

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
181 Research products, page 1 of 19
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Birgith Pedersen; Birgitte Lerbæk; Lone Jørgensen; Helle Haslund-Thomsen; Charlotte Brun Thorup; Maja Thomsen Albrechtsen; Sara Jacobsen; Marie Germund Nielsen; Kathrine Hoffmann Kusk; Britt Laugesen; +3 more
    Country: Denmark

    COVID-19 restrictions prevented relatives from visiting and accompanying patients to hospital and required that nurses wore personal protective equipment. These changes affected patients’ relationships with relatives and challenged their ability to connect with nurses. Individual, semi-structured interviews with 15 patients were carried out to explore patients’ experiences of their relationships with relatives and their collaboration with nurses during in- and outpatient contacts in non-COVID-19 hospital wards. The analysis of data was guided by phenomenological hermeneutic frame of reference and the study was reported according to the COREQ checklist. The findings illustrated that patients felt lonely and insecure when separated from relatives, caught between relatives and professionals during information exchange, and experienced the absence of relatives as both beneficial and burdening. Visitor restrictions provided patients with time to heal but prevented provision of informal care. Patients had to take responsibility for maintaining contact with relatives independent of their health condition. COVID-19 restrictions created distance with nurses, which potentially led to insufficient physical and psychosocial care.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Stender, Marie; Nordberg, Lene Wiell;
    Country: Denmark

    Covid19 was not equally distributed among neighbourhoods in Denmark – the disadvantaged neighbourhoods on the Government’s so-called ‘parallel society list’ was recurrently pointed out as ‘Corona ghettos’ with high levels of infection and long-term lock-downs. Media and politicians were especially concerned with how people in such neighbourhoods live in crowded homes or have deviant cultural norms and social conventions, hence contesting their ways of residing and living. Yet researchers have argued that the high infection rates also had to do with the fact that residents in these areas mainly have jobs in the service industry and cannot work from home. Based on architectural-anthropological fieldwork in a range of disadvantaged neighbourhoods during and after the pandemic, this paper focuses on how the Covid19 lock-down was experienced from within: How did people handle being stuck within the boundaries of the home, and what was the impact of the pandemic on the stigmatization, density and social infrastructure of these neighbourhoods? The study presents findings on different levels: First of all, we need to question prevalent notions of the home as a shelter and safe haven. For many people not least vulnerable groups, pandemic stuckness (Steiner & Veel 2021) at home was a frustrating or even tragic experience. Second, the pandemic demonstrated that home is not necessarily delimited by the four walls of the house. In the disadvantaged neighbourhoods many residents have social relations outside Denmark, and during the pandemic, they were not just stuck behind domestic boundaries, but also national boundaries. However, as other places, the pandemic also paved way for new community activities and practical help among neighbours, rendering visible valuable social infrastructure that may remain unnoticed in pre- and post-pandemic times.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Björn Thór Jónsson; Magda Pischetola; Nanna Inie; Mats Daniels; Claus Brabrand;
    Country: Denmark

    We present a long-term study of how university students experienced teaching/learning activities throughout the Covid-19 pandemic in Denmark1. We collected data through questionnaires from N=365 students enrolled in the “Intro- duction to Database Systems” course during four consecutive semesters (Spring 2020 to Fall 2021). The two years span the entire period of the pandemic’s interruption of normal on-site teaching, until restrictions were completely lifted in Denmark. The study investigates student preferences for online versus on- site teaching, and identifies the advantages of both, as well as changes in preferences throughout the pandemic. Quantitatively, the results demonstrate a preference for on-site over online teaching which was more pronounced for exercise classes than for lectures. Qualitatively, the study identifies several advantages of both online and on-site teaching; including a more engaging learning environment and better teacher-student interaction for on-site lectures, and flexibility and self-paced learning for online teaching. The primary changes identified were an increased sense of being able to focus online and a decrease in ease of asking questions online towards the later stages of the pandemic. Finally, we highlight the opportunity for universities to provide hybrid models of teaching, in order to care for diverse student preferences and needs.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Melanie Duckert; Eve Hoggan; Louise Barkhuus; Pernille Bjørn; Nina Boulus-Rodje; Susanne Bødker; Naja Holten Møller; Irina Shklovski;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.
    Country: Denmark

    Remote and hybrid work has received significant attention in the last years in both academic and industrial contexts, especially due to the COVID-19 pandemic and attendant lockdown. Some of the remaining challenges in current remote technologies include limited embodiment, hierarchy and agency issues, and significant technological limitations. In this workshop, we will, together with the participants, explore how to design socio-technical systems that connect people and artefacts during collaborative activities. The workshop will use provocations, artefacts, and group work to imagine the futures of work with a focus on hybrid work practices.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nana Ernst Toldam; Christian Graugaard; Rikke Meyer; Louise Thomsen; Sabine Dreier; Emmanuele A. Jannini; Annamaria Giraldi;
    Country: Denmark

    Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted profoundly on the wellbeing and social interactions of the world population, and all dimensions of sexual health were potentially affected by globally implemented preventive measures. Objectives: The scoping review aimed to compile existing research investigating possible effects of COVID-19 lockdowns on adult sexual health, that is, sexual behavior, functioning, and satisfaction. Further, studies on the interplay between mental health and sexual well-being during the pandemic were reviewed. Methods: The review was conducted in accordance with guidelines established by the Joanna Briggs Institute and the Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) Checklist. On October 11–12, 2021, PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl, Cochrane, Sociological Abstracts and Scopus were systematically searched for relevant peer-reviewed papers employing quantitative methodology. Additionally, unpublished (“grey”) research studies on the subject were retrieved. The screening, data extraction, and analysis of evidence were conducted by 4 independent reviewers using an iterative approach. Results: Based on 107 studies included, the scoping review showed that the pandemic had had a wide impact on all dimensions of sexual health. Except for solo sex activities, mainly negative COVID-19 implications were identified, although findings were, in sum, characterized by complexity and unpredictability. Thus, sexual behavior, functioning, and satisfaction during the pandemic appeared to be mitigated by a broad range of sociodemographic and contextual factors. Finally, sexual health seemed deeply entwined with overall mental health. Conclusion: The scoping review revealed a broad range of COVID-19-related effects on sexual health, including an overall decline in partnered sex and a concurrent increase in solo sex activities. It also emphasized a need for future research to shed light on possible long-term consequences of the pandemic in various population groups and on all aspects of sexual health. Toldam NE, Graugaard C, Meyer R, et al. Sexual Health During COVID-19: A Scoping Review. Sex Med Rev 2022;10:714–753.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Terese L. Katzenstein; Jan Christensen; Thomas Kromann Lund; Anna Kalhauge; Frederikke Rönsholt; Daria Podlekareva; Elisabeth Arndal; Ronan M. G. Berg; Thora Wesenberg Helt; Anne-Mette Lebech; +1 more
    Publisher: European Respiratory Society
    Country: Denmark

    A large proportion of patients exhibit persistently reduced pulmonary diffusion capacity after COVID-19. It is unknown whether this is due to a post-COVID restrictive lung disease and/or pulmonary vascular disease. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between initial COVID-19 severity and haemoglobin-corrected diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLco) reduction at follow-up. Furthermore, to analyse if DLco reduction could be linked to pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and/or thromboembolic disease within the first months after the illness, a total of 67 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 from March to December 2020 were included across three severity groups: 12 not admitted to hospital (Group I), 40 admitted to hospital without intensive care unit (ICU) admission (Group II), and 15 admitted to hospital with ICU admission (Group III). At first follow-up, 5 months post SARS-CoV-2 positive testing/4 months after discharge, lung function testing, including DLco, high-resolution CT chest scan (HRCT) and ventilation-perfusion (VQ) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT were conducted. DLco was reduced in 42% of the patients; the prevalence and extent depended on the clinical severity group and was typically observed as part of a restrictive pattern with reduced total lung capacity. Reduced DLco was associated with the extent of ground-glass opacification and signs of PF on HRCT, but not with mismatched perfusion defects on VQ SPECT/CT. The severity-dependent decline in DLco observed early after COVID-19 appears to be caused by restrictive and not pulmonary vascular disease.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ebbesen, Brian Duborg; Giordano, Rocco; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Nielsen, Henrik; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Helene Balslev Clausen; Vibeke Andersson;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Conference object . 2022
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Høeg, Emil Rosenlund; Lange, Belinda;
    Country: Denmark

    The COVID-19 pandemic has increased awareness of hygiene and safety associated with Virtual Reality (VR) usage across many domains. Despite the growing need for solutions, the research on cleaning efficacy is severely lacking. To understand the impact of the issue we developed a survey to gather information on the hygiene practices in several domains. Preliminary results indicate that hygiene practices vary, with many practitioners and researchers calling for access to empirically supported best practice guidelines.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Geoffrey Olok Tabo; Lone Dirckinck-Holmfeld; Anne Bygholm;
    Publisher: Commonwealth of Learning
    Country: Denmark

    PCF10 Sub-theme: Inspiring Innovations // We explore the impact of blended learning in higher education as as innovative pedagogy integrating problem-based learning and student-centred learning in teaching and learning, during the Covid-19 pandemic. New information technology tools and applications were experimented in teaching and learning at Gulu University between 2020 and 2021 at the peak of the pandemic. The study used qualitative methods and drew on constructivism where knowledge is co-constructed through interacting systems and actors in higher education environment. It is motivating and inspirational to deploy various methods of teaching and learning during the lockdowns. Inspiring innovation such as zero-rating, MEET tool and blended learning were used to address gaps in teaching and learning in university programmes. Preferences for blended learning grew even if institutions operate in resource constrained settings. // We used online training workshops to train teachers on basic ICT tools for content development and digitisation of teachers’ teaching and learning materials. Our findings indicate that lecturers progressively develop ICT skills, attitudes, and knowledge and innovative practices to teaching and learning using available free online applications and ICT resources at their disposal. Students’ attendance was low because of lack of access to the internet and ownership of computers for blended learning. // Paper ID 5677