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53 Research products, page 1 of 6

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aneta Afelt; Christian Devaux; Jordi Serra-Cobo; Roger Frutos;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Spain, France, Spain

    During the past decade, bats were shown to a major source for new viruses. Among them are well known coronaviruses such as SRAS or MERS but also Ebola. At the same time, no direct infection from bat to human has been demonstrated. The dynamic of transmission of bat-borne viruses is therefore a complex process involving both sylvatic and urban cycles, and intermediate hosts not always identified. The threat potentially exists, and drivers must be sought for man-made environmental changes. Anthropized environments are mosaic landscapes attracting at the same place different bat species usually not found together. Anthropized landscape is also characterized by a higher density of bat-borne viruses. The threat of new bat-borne virus outbreaks has greatly increased in the recent years along with media anthropization and the extremely rapid deforestation process. Deforestation could be a major contributing factor to new viral emergences due to more frequent contacts of livestock and humans with bats possibly containing infectious viruses.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Giuliano Bobba; Nicolas Hubé;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Italy, France, France
    Project: EC | DEMOS (822590)

    This chapter addresses the general research questions of the book, namely the possibility that populists in Europe can profit from a peculiar crisis such as COVID-19, and it wonders whether populists reacted in a similar way across countries or whether the institutional role they play at the national level has affected their reactions. Findings show that while populists have tried to take advantage of the crisis situation, the impossibility of taking ownership of the COVID-19 issue has made the crisis hard to be exploited. In particular, populists in power have tried to depoliticize the pandemic, whereas radical right-populists in opposition tried to politicize the crisis without gaining relevant public support though.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jean-François Vautherot; M. F. Madelaine; J. Laporte;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were selected which reacted with bovine enteric coronavirus S and HE. Mabs to S were used to identify 2 cleavage products of S, S/gp105 and S/gp90. Monoclonals to S/gp105 and HE neutralised the virus; only Mabs to the latter inhibited haemagglutination and acetyl-esterase activity. Topological distribution of epitopes was studied on these 3 glycoproteins by means of competition binding experiments. Two independent epitopes were characterised on HE, 4 on S/gp105, and 2 on S/gp90. Neutralising Mabs defined one major site on both S/gp105 and HE; however a minor neutralisation epitope was also delineated on S/gp105. Functional mapping using neutralisation-resistant mutants confirmed the topological distribution of epitopes on S/gp105.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Keller, Damián; Costalonga, Leandro; Messina, Marcello;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons
    Country: France

    {"references": ["Abolhasani, M., Oakes, S., & Oakes, H. (2017). Music in advertising and consumer identity: The search for Heideggerian authenticity. Marketing Theory 17 (4), 473-490. (Doi: 10.1177/1470593117692021.)", "Aliel, L., Keller, D., & Alvim, V. (2019). A Soundtrack for Atravessamentos : Expanding ecologically grounded methods for ubiquitous music collaborations. In 14th International Symposium on Computer Music Multidisciplinary Research .", "Aliel, L., & Fornari, J. (2015). Creating an ecologically modeled performance through the remote manipulation of multiple soundscapes. NICS Reports , (12), 2.", "Brooks, R. A. (1991). Intelligence without representation. Artificial Intelligence 47 (1), 139-159.", "Brown, A. R., Stewart, D., Hansen, A., & Stewart, A. (2014). Making meaningful musical experiences accessible using the iPad. In Keller, D., Lazzarini, V., & Pimenta, M. S. (Eds.). Ubiquitous music (pp. 65-81). Cham, Springer.", "Carson, T. (2020). On Ecocomposition. Journal of Digital Media & Interaction , 3(5), 133-142.", "Keller, D. (2000). Compositional processes from an ecological perspective. Leonardo Music Journal , 55-60.", "Keller, D. (2001). Social and perceptual dynamics in ecologically-based composition. Electronic Musicological Review , 6.", "Keller, D., Gomes, C., & Aliel, L. (2019). The Handy Metaphor: Bimanual, touchless interaction for the internet of musical things. Journal of New Music Research, 48(4), 385-396.", "Keller, D., Messina, M., & Oliveira, F. Z. (2020). Second Wave Ubiquitous Music. Journal of Digital Media & Interaction , 3(5), 5-20.", "Messina, M., & Aliel, L. (2019). Ubiquitous Music, Gelassenheit and the Metaphysics of Presence: Hijacking the Live Score Piece Ntrallazzu 4. In 14th International Symposium on Computer Music Multidisciplinary Research , 685-695.", "Messina, M., Svidzinski, J., de Menezes Bezerra, D., & da Costa, D. F. (2019). Live Patching and Remote Interaction: A Practice-Based, Intercontinental Approach to Kiwi. In 14th International Symposium on Computer Music Multidisciplinary Research , 696-703.", "Mesz, B., Sigman, M., & Trevisan, M. (2012). A composition algorithm based on crossmodal taste-music correspondences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience , 6, 71.", "Turchet, L., Fischione, C., Essl, G., Keller, D., & Barthet, M. (2018). Internet of musical things: Vision and challenges. IEEE Access , 6, 61994-62017."]} Picture a world with no mobility. Planes are landed. Urban transportation stopped. Large gatherings are non-existent and everybody is at home. That’s 2020, today. Most countries have reduced social interactions to a minimum. Food markets, drugstores and gas stations remain open. But shopping malls, cinemas, coffee shops and pubs have closed their doors for the foreseeable future. The Covid-19 pandemic is among us, ready to strike the most vulnerable and sometimes also the healthy, rich and posh. Covid-19 impacts every social strata. This is a key difference between this disease and the plagues that have been taking lives in the peripheral countries for decades. Pulmonary and respiratory diseases are among the leading causes of death worldwide. But according to the WHO 1 (2018), the so-called Group I conditions (communicable diseases, maternal conditions arising during pregnancy and childbirth, and nutritional deficiencies) are particularly devastating among the low-income populations. Until today, music making has predominantly been done through face-to-face, synchronous interactions. While it is true that some forms of music making ⎼ for instance, studio post-production or karaoké ⎼ rely on resources that are prepared offline, the implicit target of musical activity is to make sound together, if possible in person and at the same time. The current pandemic has turned the traditional forms of music making into high-risk and in some cases potentially deadly activities. So is music making becoming an activity for a select elite, secluded from the mundane buzz and divorced from community exchanges, again? The answer from the ubimus community is a strong no!

  • Publication . Article . Part of book or chapter of book . Preprint . Conference object . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Shinan Liu; Paul Schmitt; Francesco Bronzino; Nick Feamster;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: France

    The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in dramatic changes to the daily habits of billions of people. Users increasingly have to rely on home broadband Internet access for work, education, and other activities. These changes have resulted in corresponding changes to Internet traffic patterns. This paper aims to characterize the effects of these changes with respect to Internet service providers in the United States. We study three questions: (1) How did traffic demands change in the United States as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic?; (2) What effects have these changes had on Internet performance?; (3) How did service providers respond to these changes? We study these questions using data from a diverse collection of sources. Our analysis of interconnection data for two large ISPs in the United States shows a 30–60% increase in peak traffic rates in the first quarter of 2020. In particular, we observe traffic downstream peak volumes for a major ISP increase of 13–20% while upstream peaks increased by more than 30%. Further, we observe significant variation in performance across ISPs in conjunction with the traffic volume shifts, with evident latency increases after stay-at-home orders were issued, followed by a stabilization of traffic after April. Finally, we observe that in response to changes in usage, ISPs have aggressively augmented capacity at interconnects, at more than twice the rate of normal capacity augmentation. Similarly, video conferencing applications have increased their network footprint, more than doubling their advertised IP address space.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jean Pierre Doussoulin;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The current crisis dominates everything from health to day-today life. But it will pass over within a relatively short space of time and the economic recession seems likely to reverse the long-standing pattern. Given the gravity of the circumstances, nations have been constrained to undertake unusual approach arrangements. This article proposes a framework of the COVID-19 effect following analysis and comparison of the most prominent concepts of the public health and circular economy. Our paper helps to identify the positions of each of these concepts with regard to public health, environmental sustainability and economic growth. This study enriches the literature on the environmental sciences and public health by providing analysis of the effects of the policies. Finally, this article recognizes that there must be local action priorities that allow for small and sequential wins in economic, health and environmental aspects in the territory.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Franco Barbanera; Ivan Lanese; Emilio Tuosto;
    Publisher: Springer
    Countries: Italy, France
    Project: EC | BEHAPI (778233)

    Conference moved to 2021 due to covid-19; International audience; Communicating systems are nowadays part of everyday life, yet programming and analysing them is difficult. One of the many reasons for this difficulty is their size, hence compositional approaches are a need. We discuss how to ensure relevant communication properties such as deadlock freedom in a compositional way. The idea is that communicating systems can be composed by taking two of their participants and transforming them into coupled forwarders connecting the two systems. It has been shown that, for asynchronous communications, if the participants are "compatible" then composition satisfies relevant communication properties provided that the single systems satisfy them. We show that such a result changes considerably for synchronous communications. We also discuss a different form of composition, where a unique forwarder is used.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brunet, Sylvia;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; To deal with the health crisis that has struck France since March 2020 as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, lockdown periods have been implemented and a new, exceptional, state-of-emergency legal regime has been created. The decisions for such measures, which severely limit rights and freedoms, are not taken by Parliament or local elected councils but by the President of the Republic, surrounded by a few ministers and advised by experts. The management of the crisis is, therefore, centralised and technocratic. This mode of operation, unprecedented in various ways, disrupts the usual decision-making processes within the executive branch, weakens national and local democratic bodies and undermines the rule of law.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Richard Paul; Olivier Telle; Samuel Benkimoun;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has led to the implementation of unprecedented public health intervention measures, not least the lockdown of countries worldwide. In our hyperconnected world exemplified by social media, it is now possible to derive quantitative measures of human mobilities at useful spatial scales. In this chapter we discuss how the use of Facebook data enables us not only to capture the impact of lockdown on human mobility but also to assess how changes in mobility contribute to the spread of the virus. By performing a comparative analysis across four countries of differing levels of lockdown—Sweden, US, France and Colombia—we show that mobility contributes a substantial amount to the spread of the disease. This contribution is strongest when the local number of cases is low, but, importantly, is maintained even when the virus is widespread. Current epidemiological models do not take into account such mobility patterns and yet there exists a developed theoretical framework within which mobility can be included. Inclusion of mobility data would allow public health authorities to focus on highly connected hubs of infection and, because mobility patterns are relatively stable over time, would also enable forecasting of how the spread of this or another novel virus is going to occur. Anticipating epidemics and their spread is key for developing suitable but targeted intervention strategies and avoiding draconian lockdowns that are so harmful to the economy.

  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marco Nunes; António Abreu; Jelena Bagnjuk;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: France

    International audience; The pandemics situationhas brought unforeseen challenges to all organizations at a global scale. While some strongly profit from it, others thrive to survive or already died. In suchtimesthe bulk of leadership and management related skills,gains a disproportional importance especially for organizations where most of their workforce stronglydepends on remote collaboration.Being aware of the difficultiesto manage collaboration within and between teams in “normal times”,the “still”ongoing situation hasonlybroughtmore complexityto organizationsin that aspect. In this work is proposed a model to manage organizational remote collaborative networks in order to identify collaboration extremes(lack of collaboration, or collaborative overload) which emerges as people work together in projects or operations,developed based in three pillars (collaborative networks, social network analysis, and business intelligence). A real case study is presented toillustrate the functioning principles of the model.