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1,126 Research products, page 1 of 113

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
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  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lina Miyakawa; Adam Rothman; Vishad Sheth; Paru Patrawalla; David Steiger; Nan Li; Jigna Zatakia; Joseph P. Mathew; Young Im Lee;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Archana Pattupara; Vivek Modi; Julia Goldberg; Kam Sing Ho; Kirtipal Bhatia; Yasmin Herrera; Joseph Ghassibi;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Avni Agrawal; Novera Shahid; Venkata Thammineni; Luis Rangel;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jasmine Sekhon; Divya Vangipuram; Kendall Creed; Hazim Bukamur;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jenna Dumovich; Justin Haloot; Pankaj Aggarwal; Jane O'rorke;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    TOPIC: Lung Pathology TYPE: Medical Student/Resident Case Reports INTRODUCTION: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a well-known risk of intravenous infusions, but the true incidence is poorly defined. With the arrival of COVID-19, a new intravenous medication, Banlamivimab, may be associated with TRALI. We present a unique case of Banlamivimab TRALI from COVID-19 treatment. CASE PRESENTATION: A 69-year-old female presented to the Emergency Department with complaints of fevers, generalized weakness, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnea on exertion. She was febrile to 101.2 Fahrenheit and maintaining a normal oxygen saturation level on ambient air. Laboratory tests were positive for SARS-COV-2, elevated CRP, and troponin up to 1.37 ng/mL. Complete blood count and chemistry were both normal. Chest x-ray was unremarkable. Initially, she was set to be discharged home. Infectious Disease was consulted regarding her COVID infection and recommended Banlamivimab infusion prior to discharge. Approximately 45 minutes after starting the infusion, the patient experienced sudden onset shortness of breath and rigors. She was hypoxic to 85% on ambient air, tachypneic, febrile to 102.9 Fahrenheit, hypertensive and in acute respiratory distress. She had no evidence of an allergic reaction nor anaphylaxis. The infusion was stopped immediately and she was given Solumedrol and Benadryl. Her troponin increased to 3.23 ng/mL, white blood cell count rose to 19,300/mL and her lactic acid was 6.8. Chest x-ray showed new pulmonary edema. Echocardiogram showed normal systolic and diastolic function. She was diagnosed with transfusion related lung injury and fully recovered with supportive treatment. DISCUSSION: Banlamivimab is an investigational medicine used in patients who are considered high risk for being hospitalized or progressing to severe COVID-19 infection. Although TRALI is a well-defined risk factor of blood transfusions, there is insufficient data related to transfusion related lung injuries caused by Banlamivimab infusion or other human monoclonal antibodies. When treating COVID-19 patients with Banlamivimab, TRALI must be a side effect taken into consideration due to the possibility of causing a second hit to COVID-19 damaged lungs. As highlighted by the acuity of our patient's illness, it is feasible that such an event could increase patient mortality. CONCLUSIONS: This case uniquely demonstrates the possibility of TRALI with Banlamivimab infusions and highlights the importance of early recognition and management. Furthermore, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for TRALI in patients receiving not only blood transfusions, but also any human monoclonal antibody infusions. REFERENCE #1: (2021, March 18). FACT SHEET FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS EMERGENCY USE AUTHORIZATION (EUA) OF BAMLANIVIMAB AND ETESEVIMAB. Eli Lilly and Company. Retrieved April 30, 2021, from https://www.covid19.lilly.com/bam-ete/getting-started REFERENCE #2: Petraszko, T. (2019, February 26). Transfusion-related acute lung Injury (trali). Retrieved April 30, 2021, from https://professionaleducation.blood.ca/en/transfusion/publications/transfusion-related-acute-lung-injury-trali REFERENCE #3: Kleinman, S., MD. (n.d.). Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Retrieved April 30, 2021, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/transfusion-related-acute-lung-injury-trali#H1588910 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Pankaj Aggarwal, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Jenna Dumovich, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Justin Haloot, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Jane O'Rorke, source=Web Response

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Brandon Jakubowski; Rosechelle M. Ruggiero;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    TOPIC: Lung Cancer TYPE: Fellow Case Reports INTRODUCTION: Mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), is a system of lymphoid tissue found within various organs that plays a role in regulating local immunity. As this tissue contains T, B, and plasma cells, it is the potential site for the development of lymphoma. MALT lymphomas are a form of B-cell extranodal lymphoma that can originate from marginal zone lymphocytes within the lung, referred to as pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma (PMZL). CASE PRESENTATION: We present a 42-year-old female referred to our clinic for evaluation of pulmonary nodules and mediastinal adenopathy. She had a one year history of Sjogren's syndrome. At that time she had no pulmonary or B symptoms. To evaluate her mediastinal adenopathy, she was referred for endobronchial ultrasound where pathologic evaluation revealed only a polymorphous lymphoid population and was negative for malignancy. She had several endobronchial hypervascular and polypoid nodules within the mainstem airways. Pathology from these nodules demonstrated an atypical lymphoid infiltrate, but was unable to be characterized any further.Given ongoing concern for a lymphoproliferative process, she was referred for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Pathology from her left upper and lower lobar wedge resections demonstrated follicular bronchiolitis. Biopsy of a pleural nodule demonstrated a lymphoproliferative process concerning for a low-grade B-cell neoplasm, thought to be extranodal PMZL. She was referred to oncology where PET/FDG demonstrated hypermetabolic multi-station adenopathy suggesting stage IV disease. Given her asymptomatic nature and anticipated indolent course, it was decided to defer chemotherapy pending resolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. DISCUSSION: MALT lymphoma can develop in response to continuous antigen stimulation, as is seen in Sjogren's syndrome or tobacco use. Radiographic features of MALT lymphoma are numerous, including consolidations, nodules, and masses being the most frequent patterns observed in ~50% of patients. Endobronchial lesions as observed in this patient occur in ~85% of cases. PET/FDG imaging commonly demonstrates mild uptake within identifiable lesions. It has a very favorable prognosis with an overall 5-year survival of 90% due to its indolent nature and excellent response rate to chemoimmunotherapy, typically combination Bendamustine and Rituximab. CONCLUSIONS: MALT lymphoma is an uncommon neoplasm that can occur due to chronic antigen stimulation, especially in patients with Sjogren's syndrome. It has numerous radiographic features, the most common being endobronchial lesions. When given these clinical features, establishing a diagnosis is of utmost importance due to the excellent response rate to therapy and favorable long-term prognosis. REFERENCE #1: Borie R, Wislez M, Thabut G, et al. Clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of pulmonary MALT lymphoma. Eur Respir J. 2009;34(6):1408-1416. REFERENCE #2: Husnain M, Kuker R, Reis IM, et al. Clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma: A single center analysis. Cancer Med. 2020;9(14):5051-5064. REFERENCE #3: Stefanovic A, Morgensztern D, Fong T, Lossos IS. Pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma: a single centre experience and review of the SEER database. Leuk Lymphoma. 2008;49(7):1311-1320. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Brandon Jakubowski, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Rosechelle Ruggiero, source=Web Response

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thayyil Jayakrishnan; Thejus; Haag; Aaron; Mealy; Shane; Minich; Corbyn; Attah; Abraham; +26 more
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Veronica L. Chan; Judy Y. Lam; Wah-Shing Leung; Alsa W. Lin; Chung-Ming Chu;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kanak Parmar; Kenneth Iwuji; Gaspar Del Rio-Pertuz; Anasua Deb; Mostafa Abohelwa; Cristina Morataya; Kenneth Nugent;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sarah Martell; Hannah Karpel; Elana Kreiger-Benson; Kelsey Luoma; Vikramjit Mukherjee;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,126 Research products, page 1 of 113
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lina Miyakawa; Adam Rothman; Vishad Sheth; Paru Patrawalla; David Steiger; Nan Li; Jigna Zatakia; Joseph P. Mathew; Young Im Lee;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Archana Pattupara; Vivek Modi; Julia Goldberg; Kam Sing Ho; Kirtipal Bhatia; Yasmin Herrera; Joseph Ghassibi;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Avni Agrawal; Novera Shahid; Venkata Thammineni; Luis Rangel;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jasmine Sekhon; Divya Vangipuram; Kendall Creed; Hazim Bukamur;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jenna Dumovich; Justin Haloot; Pankaj Aggarwal; Jane O'rorke;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    TOPIC: Lung Pathology TYPE: Medical Student/Resident Case Reports INTRODUCTION: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a well-known risk of intravenous infusions, but the true incidence is poorly defined. With the arrival of COVID-19, a new intravenous medication, Banlamivimab, may be associated with TRALI. We present a unique case of Banlamivimab TRALI from COVID-19 treatment. CASE PRESENTATION: A 69-year-old female presented to the Emergency Department with complaints of fevers, generalized weakness, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnea on exertion. She was febrile to 101.2 Fahrenheit and maintaining a normal oxygen saturation level on ambient air. Laboratory tests were positive for SARS-COV-2, elevated CRP, and troponin up to 1.37 ng/mL. Complete blood count and chemistry were both normal. Chest x-ray was unremarkable. Initially, she was set to be discharged home. Infectious Disease was consulted regarding her COVID infection and recommended Banlamivimab infusion prior to discharge. Approximately 45 minutes after starting the infusion, the patient experienced sudden onset shortness of breath and rigors. She was hypoxic to 85% on ambient air, tachypneic, febrile to 102.9 Fahrenheit, hypertensive and in acute respiratory distress. She had no evidence of an allergic reaction nor anaphylaxis. The infusion was stopped immediately and she was given Solumedrol and Benadryl. Her troponin increased to 3.23 ng/mL, white blood cell count rose to 19,300/mL and her lactic acid was 6.8. Chest x-ray showed new pulmonary edema. Echocardiogram showed normal systolic and diastolic function. She was diagnosed with transfusion related lung injury and fully recovered with supportive treatment. DISCUSSION: Banlamivimab is an investigational medicine used in patients who are considered high risk for being hospitalized or progressing to severe COVID-19 infection. Although TRALI is a well-defined risk factor of blood transfusions, there is insufficient data related to transfusion related lung injuries caused by Banlamivimab infusion or other human monoclonal antibodies. When treating COVID-19 patients with Banlamivimab, TRALI must be a side effect taken into consideration due to the possibility of causing a second hit to COVID-19 damaged lungs. As highlighted by the acuity of our patient's illness, it is feasible that such an event could increase patient mortality. CONCLUSIONS: This case uniquely demonstrates the possibility of TRALI with Banlamivimab infusions and highlights the importance of early recognition and management. Furthermore, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for TRALI in patients receiving not only blood transfusions, but also any human monoclonal antibody infusions. REFERENCE #1: (2021, March 18). FACT SHEET FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS EMERGENCY USE AUTHORIZATION (EUA) OF BAMLANIVIMAB AND ETESEVIMAB. Eli Lilly and Company. Retrieved April 30, 2021, from https://www.covid19.lilly.com/bam-ete/getting-started REFERENCE #2: Petraszko, T. (2019, February 26). Transfusion-related acute lung Injury (trali). Retrieved April 30, 2021, from https://professionaleducation.blood.ca/en/transfusion/publications/transfusion-related-acute-lung-injury-trali REFERENCE #3: Kleinman, S., MD. (n.d.). Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Retrieved April 30, 2021, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/transfusion-related-acute-lung-injury-trali#H1588910 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Pankaj Aggarwal, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Jenna Dumovich, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Justin Haloot, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Jane O'Rorke, source=Web Response

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Brandon Jakubowski; Rosechelle M. Ruggiero;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    TOPIC: Lung Cancer TYPE: Fellow Case Reports INTRODUCTION: Mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), is a system of lymphoid tissue found within various organs that plays a role in regulating local immunity. As this tissue contains T, B, and plasma cells, it is the potential site for the development of lymphoma. MALT lymphomas are a form of B-cell extranodal lymphoma that can originate from marginal zone lymphocytes within the lung, referred to as pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma (PMZL). CASE PRESENTATION: We present a 42-year-old female referred to our clinic for evaluation of pulmonary nodules and mediastinal adenopathy. She had a one year history of Sjogren's syndrome. At that time she had no pulmonary or B symptoms. To evaluate her mediastinal adenopathy, she was referred for endobronchial ultrasound where pathologic evaluation revealed only a polymorphous lymphoid population and was negative for malignancy. She had several endobronchial hypervascular and polypoid nodules within the mainstem airways. Pathology from these nodules demonstrated an atypical lymphoid infiltrate, but was unable to be characterized any further.Given ongoing concern for a lymphoproliferative process, she was referred for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Pathology from her left upper and lower lobar wedge resections demonstrated follicular bronchiolitis. Biopsy of a pleural nodule demonstrated a lymphoproliferative process concerning for a low-grade B-cell neoplasm, thought to be extranodal PMZL. She was referred to oncology where PET/FDG demonstrated hypermetabolic multi-station adenopathy suggesting stage IV disease. Given her asymptomatic nature and anticipated indolent course, it was decided to defer chemotherapy pending resolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. DISCUSSION: MALT lymphoma can develop in response to continuous antigen stimulation, as is seen in Sjogren's syndrome or tobacco use. Radiographic features of MALT lymphoma are numerous, including consolidations, nodules, and masses being the most frequent patterns observed in ~50% of patients. Endobronchial lesions as observed in this patient occur in ~85% of cases. PET/FDG imaging commonly demonstrates mild uptake within identifiable lesions. It has a very favorable prognosis with an overall 5-year survival of 90% due to its indolent nature and excellent response rate to chemoimmunotherapy, typically combination Bendamustine and Rituximab. CONCLUSIONS: MALT lymphoma is an uncommon neoplasm that can occur due to chronic antigen stimulation, especially in patients with Sjogren's syndrome. It has numerous radiographic features, the most common being endobronchial lesions. When given these clinical features, establishing a diagnosis is of utmost importance due to the excellent response rate to therapy and favorable long-term prognosis. REFERENCE #1: Borie R, Wislez M, Thabut G, et al. Clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of pulmonary MALT lymphoma. Eur Respir J. 2009;34(6):1408-1416. REFERENCE #2: Husnain M, Kuker R, Reis IM, et al. Clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma: A single center analysis. Cancer Med. 2020;9(14):5051-5064. REFERENCE #3: Stefanovic A, Morgensztern D, Fong T, Lossos IS. Pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma: a single centre experience and review of the SEER database. Leuk Lymphoma. 2008;49(7):1311-1320. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Brandon Jakubowski, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Rosechelle Ruggiero, source=Web Response

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thayyil Jayakrishnan; Thejus; Haag; Aaron; Mealy; Shane; Minich; Corbyn; Attah; Abraham; +26 more
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Veronica L. Chan; Judy Y. Lam; Wah-Shing Leung; Alsa W. Lin; Chung-Ming Chu;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kanak Parmar; Kenneth Iwuji; Gaspar Del Rio-Pertuz; Anasua Deb; Mostafa Abohelwa; Cristina Morataya; Kenneth Nugent;
    Publisher: American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sarah Martell; Hannah Karpel; Elana Kreiger-Benson; Kelsey Luoma; Vikramjit Mukherjee;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV