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17 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • COVID-19
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sherry Shiqian Gao; Gwendolyn Amarquaye; Gwendolyn Amarquaye; Peter Arrow; Peter Arrow; Peter Arrow; Kalpana Bansal; Raman Bedi; Raman Bedi; Guglielmo Campus; +24 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
    Country: Switzerland

    Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) was developed in Japan in the 1960s. It is a clear solution containing silver and fluoride ions. Because of its anti-bacterial and remineralizing effect, silver diamine fluoride has been used in managing dental caries for decades worldwide. This paper aims to summarize and discuss the global policies, guidelines, and relevant information on utilizing SDF for caries management. SDF can be used for treating dental caries in most countries. However, it is not permitted to be used in mainland China. Several manufacturers, mainly in Australia, Brazil, India, Japan, and the United States, produce SDF at different concentrations that are commercially available around the world. The prices differ between contents and brands. Different government organizations and dental associations have developed guidelines for clinical use of SDF. Dental professionals can refer to the specific guidelines in their own countries or territories. Training for using SDF is part of undergraduate and/or postgraduate curriculums in almost all countries. However, real utilization of SDF of dentists, especially in the private sector, remains unclear in most places because little research has been conducted. There are at least two ongoing regional-wide large-scale oral health programs, using SDF as one of the components to manage dental caries in young children (one in Hong Kong and one in Mongolia). Because SDF treatment does not require caries removal, and it is simple, non-invasive, and inexpensive, SDF is a valuable strategy for caries management in young children, elderly people, and patients with special needs. In addition, to reduce the risk of bacteria or virus transmission in dental settings, using SDF as a non-aerosol producing procedure should be emphasized under the COVID-19 outbreak.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arianna Taddei; Esmeralda Azahar López; Rebeca Abigail Recinos Reyes;
    Publisher: FrancoAngeli
    Country: Italy

    The COVID-19 has dramatically increased the inequalities of the opportunities to education and health services of the children with disabilities. The data collected from international agencies between 2020 and 2021 demonstrate the danger of further rising the risk of exclusion of children with disabilities especially in developing countries. The marginalization of people with sensory disabilities during the Pandemic have further expanded compared to the pre-Covid situation. The article aims to investigate the barriers that children with hearing disabilities have encountered in accessing socio-educational and rehabilitation services and reflect on the importance of social support flexibly from different local actors. In this perspective, the Center of Attention for Communication, Hearing and Language of the Central American University José Simeón Cañas of El Salvador provides educational and rehabilitation service aimed to children with hearing disabilities transforming their methodologies and practices. Based on this analysis, perspectives of action and research will be envisaged to plan the future starting from the lessons learned.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    José Luis Rocha;
    Publisher: Centro Scalabriniano de Estudos Migratórios

    Resumen La pandemia del COVID-19 y las medidas para enfrentarla han trastocado innumerables procesos sociales. La migración hacia los Estados Unidos está lejos de ser la excepción. Después de aportar cifras que apoyan la hipótesis del descenso del flujo migratorio hacia los Estados Unidos en 2020 debido al temor al coronavirus y a una contracción del mercado laboral, este texto compara la situación de los migrantes centroamericanos en dos ubicaciones: los suburbios de Virginia y la ciudad de Los Angeles. Cuatro centroamericanos proporcionan información fresca sobre cómo están lidiando con las restricciones impuestas por los diferentes niveles del Estado y la reducción de las oportunidades de empleo. Sus declaraciones permiten identificar algunos factores de elevada influencia en un incremento de riesgos y daños en la ciudad de Los Angeles: densidad poblacional, desacuerdos entre las autoridades estatales y un estilo de vida de intensa socialización típico de una megalópolis. Por esta razón el impacto del COVID-19 en los lugares aquí mencionados es una historia de dos ciudades con fuertes contrastes. Quedan muchas preguntas para seguir investigando. Este texto ante todo muestra un retrato de cómo los asuntos relacionados con la pandemia son enfrentados por los migrantes en la vida cotidiana, según sus propias palabras.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Guglielmo Campus; M Diaz Betancourt; MG Cagetti; Rodrigo A. Giacaman; David J. Manton; Gva Douglas; Thiago Saads Carvalho; JC Carvalho; Ana Vukovic; FJ Cortés-Martinicorena; +122 more
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Spain, Switzerland

    OBJECTIVES: A multicentre survey was designed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 outbreak on dental practice worldwide, estimate the COVID-19 related symptoms/signs, work attitudes and behaviour and the routine use of protective measures and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). METHODS: A global survey using a standardized questionnaire with research groups from 36 countries was designed. The questionnaire was developed and pretested during April 2020 and contained three domains: 1) Personal data; 2) COVID-19 positive rate and symptoms/signs presumably related to the coronavirus; 3) Working conditions and PPE adopted after the outbreak. Countries' data were grouped by the Country Positive Rate (CPR) during the survey period and by Gross-National-Income per capita. An ordinal multinomial logistic regression model was carried out with COVID-19 self-reported rate referred by dental professionals as dependent variable to assess the association with questionnaire items. RESULTS: A total of 52,491 questionnaires were returned with a male/female ratio of 0.63. Out of the total respondents, 7,859 dental professionals (15%) reported symptoms/signs compatible with COVID-19. More than half of the sample (n = 27,818; 53%) stated to use FFP2/N95 masks, while 21,558 (41.07%) used eye protection. In the bivariate analysis, CPR and N95/FFP2 were significantly associated (OR = 1.80 95%CI = 1.60/2.82 and OR = 5.20 95%CI = 1.44/18.80, respectively), while Gross-National-Income was not statistically associated with CPR (OR = 1.09 95%CI = 0.97/1.60). The same significant associations were observed in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Oral health service provision has not been significantly affected by COVID-19, although access to routine dental care was reduced due to country-specific temporary lockdown periods. While the dental profession has been identified at high-risk, the reported rates of COVID-19 for dental professionals were not significantly different to those reported for the general population in each country. These findings may help to better plan oral health care for future pandemic events. ispartof: JOURNAL OF DENTISTRY vol:114 ispartof: location:England status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Memish, Ziad A.; Cotten, Matthew; Meyer, Benjamin; Watson, Simon J.; Alsahafi, Abdullah J.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Corman, Victor Max; Sieberg, Andrea; Makhdoom, Hatem Q.; Assiri, Abdullah; +10 more
    Countries: Netherlands, Netherlands, United Kingdom
    Project: WT , EC | ANTIGONE (278976), EC | EMPERIE (223498)

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species transmission. Camels may act as a direct source of human MERS-CoV infection.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Basem Alraddadi; Hanadi Alsalmi; Kara Jacobs-Slifka; Rachel B. Slayton; Concepcion F. Estivariz; Andrew I. Geller; Hanan H. Al-Turkistani; Sanaa S. Al-Rehily; Haleema Ali Alserehi; Ghassan Wali; +6 more
    Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Healthcare settings can amplify transmission of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), but knowledge gaps about the epidemiology of transmission remain. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among healthcare personnel in hospital units that treated MERS-CoV patients. Participants were interviewed about exposures to MERS-CoV patients, use of personal protective equipment, and signs and symptoms of illness after exposure. Infection status was determined by the presence of antibodies against MERS-CoV. To assess risk factors, we compared infected and uninfected participants. Healthcare personnel caring for MERS-CoV patients were at high risk for infection, but infection most often resulted in a relatively mild illness that might be unrecognized. In the healthcare personnel cohort reported here, infections occurred exclusively among those who had close contact with MERS-CoV patients. Infections occurred exclusively among personnel who had close contact with MERS-CoV patients.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sree Pooja Varahachalam; Behnaz Lahooti; Masoumeh Chamaneh; Sounak Bagchi; Tanya Chhibber; Kevin Morris; Joe F. Bolanos; Nam-Young Kim; Ajeet Kaushik;
    Publisher: Dove

    Sree Pooja Varahachalam,1 Behnaz Lahooti,1 Masoumeh Chamaneh,1 Sounak Bagchi,1 Tanya Chhibber,1 Kevin Morris,2 Joe F Bolanos,3 Nam-Young Kim,4 Ajeet Kaushik5 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jerry H. Hodge School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC), Amarillo, TX 79106, USA; 2Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS), Nashik, Maharashtra 422004, India; 3Facultad De Ciencias De La Salud “Dr.Luis Edmundo Vasquez” Santa Tecla, Universidad Dr. Jose Matias Delgado, Cd Merliot, El Salvador; 4RFIC Bio Center, Department of Electronics Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897, South Korea; 5NanoBioTech Laboratory, Department of Natural Sciences, Division of Sciences, Art, and Mathematics, Florida Polytechnic University, Lakeland, FL 3385, USACorrespondence: Ajeet KaushikNanoBioTech Laboratory, Department of Natural Sciences, Division of Sciences, Art, and Mathematics, Florida Polytechnic University, Lakeland, FL 3385, USAEmail akaushik@floridapoly.eduAbstract: The newly emerged ribonucleic acid (RNA) enveloped human beta-coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection caused the COVID-19 pandemic, severely affects the respiratory system, and may lead to death. Lacking effective diagnostics and therapies made this pandemic challenging to manage since the SARS-CoV-2 transmits via human-to-human, enters via ACE2 and TMPSSR2 receptors, and damages organs rich in host cells, spreads via symptomatic carriers and is prominent in an immune-compromised population. New SARS-CoV-2 informatics (structure, strains, like-cycles, functional sites) motivated bio-pharma experts to investigate novel therapeutic agents that act to recognize, inhibit, and knockdown combinations of drugs, vaccines, and antibodies, have been optimized to manage COVID-19. However, successful targeted delivery of these agents to avoid off-targeting and unnecessary drug ingestion is very challenging. To overcome these obstacles, this mini-review projects nanomedicine technology, a pharmacologically relevant cargo of size within 10 to 200 nm, for site-specific delivery of a therapeutic agent to recognize and eradicate the SARS-CoV-2, and improving the human immune system. Such combinational therapy based on compartmentalization controls the delivery and releases of a drug optimized based on patient genomic profile and medical history. Nanotechnology could help combat COVID-19 via various methods such as avoiding viral contamination and spraying by developing personal protective equipment (PPE) to increase the protection of healthcare workers and produce effective antiviral disinfectants surface coatings capable of inactivating and preventing the virus from spreading. To quickly recognize the infection or immunological response, design highly accurate and sensitive nano-based sensors. Development of new drugs with improved activity, reduced toxicity, and sustained release to the lungs, as well as tissue targets; and development of nano-based immunizations to improve humoral and cellular immune responses. The desired and controlled features of suggested personalized therapeutics, nanomedicine, is a potential therapy to manage COVID-19 successfully. The state-of-the-art nanomedicine, challenges, and prospects of nanomedicine are carefully and critically discussed in this report, which may serve as a key platform for scholars to investigate the role of nanomedicine for higher efficacy to manage the COVID-19 pandemic.Keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2 viral infection, nanomedicine, personalized COVID-19 management, drug delivery

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Manuel Cardona; Fernando Cortez; Andres Palacios; Kevin Cerros;
    Publisher: Editorial Universidad Don Bosco
    Country: El Salvador

    This article presents an investigation about the different applications of mobile robots in the fight against the Covid- 19 pandemic. It shows the different contributions of companies around the world that seek to adapt to the new needs in order to be able to mitigate the progress of the Covid-19 using mobile robots as a tool, focusing primarily in the area of health and service.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anita Cicero; Diane Meyer; Matthew P. Shearer; Sazaly AbuBakar; Ken Bernard; W. Seth Carus; Chee Kheong Chong; Julie E. Fischer; Noreen A. Hynes; Thomas V. Inglesby; +9 more
    Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    A strategic multilateral dialogue related to biosecurity risks in Southeast Asia, established in 2014, now includes participants from Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, and the United States. This dialogue is conducted at the nonministerial level, enabling participants to engage without the constraints of operating in their official capacities. Participants reflect on mechanisms to detect, mitigate, and respond to biosecurity risks and highlight biosecurity issues for national leadership. Participants have also identified factors to improve regional and global biosecurity, including improved engagement and collaboration across relevant ministries and agencies, sustainable funding for biosecurity programs, enhanced information sharing for communicable diseases, and increased engagement in international biosecurity forums.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bounlay Phommasack; Chuleeporn Jiraphongsa; Moe Ko Oo; Katherine C. Bond; Natalie Phaholyothin; Rapeepong Suphanchaimat; Kumnuan Ungchusak; Sarah B. Macfarlane;
    Publisher: Emerging Health Threats Journal

    The Mekong Basin Disease Surveillance (MBDS) network was formally established in 2001 through a Memorandum of Understanding signed by six Ministers of Health of the countries in the Greater Mekong sub-region: Cambodia, China (Yunnan and Guangxi), Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. The main areas of focus of the network are to: i) improve cross-border infectious disease outbreak investigation and response by sharing surveillance data and best practices in disease recognition and reporting, and by jointly responding to outbreaks; ii) develop expertise in epidemiological surveillance across the countries; and iii) enhance communication between the countries. Comprised of senior health officials, epidemiologists, health practitioners, and other professionals, the MBDS has grown and matured over the years into an entity based on mutual trust that can be sustained into the future. Other regions have started emulating the network's pioneering work. In this paper, we describe the development of MBDS, the way in which it operates today, and some of its achievements. We present key challenges the network has faced and lessons its members have learned about how to develop sufficient trust for health and other professionals to alert each other to disease threats across national borders and thereby more effectively combat these threats. Keywords: MBDS; trust-based collaboration; Mekong Basin; infectious disease surveillance; regional network; cross-border; human resource; outbreak investigation and response; FETP; epidemiological capacity (Published: 25 January 2013) Citation: Emerg Health Threats J 2013, 6 : 19944 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ehtj.v6i0.19944

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
17 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sherry Shiqian Gao; Gwendolyn Amarquaye; Gwendolyn Amarquaye; Peter Arrow; Peter Arrow; Peter Arrow; Kalpana Bansal; Raman Bedi; Raman Bedi; Guglielmo Campus; +24 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
    Country: Switzerland

    Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) was developed in Japan in the 1960s. It is a clear solution containing silver and fluoride ions. Because of its anti-bacterial and remineralizing effect, silver diamine fluoride has been used in managing dental caries for decades worldwide. This paper aims to summarize and discuss the global policies, guidelines, and relevant information on utilizing SDF for caries management. SDF can be used for treating dental caries in most countries. However, it is not permitted to be used in mainland China. Several manufacturers, mainly in Australia, Brazil, India, Japan, and the United States, produce SDF at different concentrations that are commercially available around the world. The prices differ between contents and brands. Different government organizations and dental associations have developed guidelines for clinical use of SDF. Dental professionals can refer to the specific guidelines in their own countries or territories. Training for using SDF is part of undergraduate and/or postgraduate curriculums in almost all countries. However, real utilization of SDF of dentists, especially in the private sector, remains unclear in most places because little research has been conducted. There are at least two ongoing regional-wide large-scale oral health programs, using SDF as one of the components to manage dental caries in young children (one in Hong Kong and one in Mongolia). Because SDF treatment does not require caries removal, and it is simple, non-invasive, and inexpensive, SDF is a valuable strategy for caries management in young children, elderly people, and patients with special needs. In addition, to reduce the risk of bacteria or virus transmission in dental settings, using SDF as a non-aerosol producing procedure should be emphasized under the COVID-19 outbreak.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arianna Taddei; Esmeralda Azahar López; Rebeca Abigail Recinos Reyes;
    Publisher: FrancoAngeli
    Country: Italy

    The COVID-19 has dramatically increased the inequalities of the opportunities to education and health services of the children with disabilities. The data collected from international agencies between 2020 and 2021 demonstrate the danger of further rising the risk of exclusion of children with disabilities especially in developing countries. The marginalization of people with sensory disabilities during the Pandemic have further expanded compared to the pre-Covid situation. The article aims to investigate the barriers that children with hearing disabilities have encountered in accessing socio-educational and rehabilitation services and reflect on the importance of social support flexibly from different local actors. In this perspective, the Center of Attention for Communication, Hearing and Language of the Central American University José Simeón Cañas of El Salvador provides educational and rehabilitation service aimed to children with hearing disabilities transforming their methodologies and practices. Based on this analysis, perspectives of action and research will be envisaged to plan the future starting from the lessons learned.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    José Luis Rocha;
    Publisher: Centro Scalabriniano de Estudos Migratórios

    Resumen La pandemia del COVID-19 y las medidas para enfrentarla han trastocado innumerables procesos sociales. La migración hacia los Estados Unidos está lejos de ser la excepción. Después de aportar cifras que apoyan la hipótesis del descenso del flujo migratorio hacia los Estados Unidos en 2020 debido al temor al coronavirus y a una contracción del mercado laboral, este texto compara la situación de los migrantes centroamericanos en dos ubicaciones: los suburbios de Virginia y la ciudad de Los Angeles. Cuatro centroamericanos proporcionan información fresca sobre cómo están lidiando con las restricciones impuestas por los diferentes niveles del Estado y la reducción de las oportunidades de empleo. Sus declaraciones permiten identificar algunos factores de elevada influencia en un incremento de riesgos y daños en la ciudad de Los Angeles: densidad poblacional, desacuerdos entre las autoridades estatales y un estilo de vida de intensa socialización típico de una megalópolis. Por esta razón el impacto del COVID-19 en los lugares aquí mencionados es una historia de dos ciudades con fuertes contrastes. Quedan muchas preguntas para seguir investigando. Este texto ante todo muestra un retrato de cómo los asuntos relacionados con la pandemia son enfrentados por los migrantes en la vida cotidiana, según sus propias palabras.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Guglielmo Campus; M Diaz Betancourt; MG Cagetti; Rodrigo A. Giacaman; David J. Manton; Gva Douglas; Thiago Saads Carvalho; JC Carvalho; Ana Vukovic; FJ Cortés-Martinicorena; +122 more
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Spain, Switzerland

    OBJECTIVES: A multicentre survey was designed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 outbreak on dental practice worldwide, estimate the COVID-19 related symptoms/signs, work attitudes and behaviour and the routine use of protective measures and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). METHODS: A global survey using a standardized questionnaire with research groups from 36 countries was designed. The questionnaire was developed and pretested during April 2020 and contained three domains: 1) Personal data; 2) COVID-19 positive rate and symptoms/signs presumably related to the coronavirus; 3) Working conditions and PPE adopted after the outbreak. Countries' data were grouped by the Country Positive Rate (CPR) during the survey period and by Gross-National-Income per capita. An ordinal multinomial logistic regression model was carried out with COVID-19 self-reported rate referred by dental professionals as dependent variable to assess the association with questionnaire items. RESULTS: A total of 52,491 questionnaires were returned with a male/female ratio of 0.63. Out of the total respondents, 7,859 dental professionals (15%) reported symptoms/signs compatible with COVID-19. More than half of the sample (n = 27,818; 53%) stated to use FFP2/N95 masks, while 21,558 (41.07%) used eye protection. In the bivariate analysis, CPR and N95/FFP2 were significantly associated (OR = 1.80 95%CI = 1.60/2.82 and OR = 5.20 95%CI = 1.44/18.80, respectively), while Gross-National-Income was not statistically associated with CPR (OR = 1.09 95%CI = 0.97/1.60). The same significant associations were observed in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Oral health service provision has not been significantly affected by COVID-19, although access to routine dental care was reduced due to country-specific temporary lockdown periods. While the dental profession has been identified at high-risk, the reported rates of COVID-19 for dental professionals were not significantly different to those reported for the general population in each country. These findings may help to better plan oral health care for future pandemic events. ispartof: JOURNAL OF DENTISTRY vol:114 ispartof: location:England status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Memish, Ziad A.; Cotten, Matthew; Meyer, Benjamin; Watson, Simon J.; Alsahafi, Abdullah J.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Corman, Victor Max; Sieberg, Andrea; Makhdoom, Hatem Q.; Assiri, Abdullah; +10 more
    Countries: Netherlands, Netherlands, United Kingdom
    Project: WT , EC | ANTIGONE (278976), EC | EMPERIE (223498)

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species transmission. Camels may act as a direct source of human MERS-CoV infection.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Basem Alraddadi; Hanadi Alsalmi; Kara Jacobs-Slifka; Rachel B. Slayton; Concepcion F. Estivariz; Andrew I. Geller; Hanan H. Al-Turkistani; Sanaa S. Al-Rehily; Haleema Ali Alserehi; Ghassan Wali; +6 more
    Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Healthcare settings can amplify transmission of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), but knowledge gaps about the epidemiology of transmission remain. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among healthcare personnel in hospital units that treated MERS-CoV patients. Participants were interviewed about exposures to MERS-CoV patients, use of personal protective equipment, and signs and symptoms of illness after exposure. Infection status was determined by the presence of antibodies against MERS-CoV. To assess risk factors, we compared infected and uninfected participants. Healthcare personnel caring for MERS-CoV patients were at high risk for infection, but infection most often resulted in a relatively mild illness that might be unrecognized. In the healthcare personnel cohort reported here, infections occurred exclusively among those who had close contact with MERS-CoV patients. Infections occurred exclusively among personnel who had close contact with MERS-CoV patients.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sree Pooja Varahachalam; Behnaz Lahooti; Masoumeh Chamaneh; Sounak Bagchi; Tanya Chhibber; Kevin Morris; Joe F. Bolanos; Nam-Young Kim; Ajeet Kaushik;
    Publisher: Dove

    Sree Pooja Varahachalam,1 Behnaz Lahooti,1 Masoumeh Chamaneh,1 Sounak Bagchi,1 Tanya Chhibber,1 Kevin Morris,2 Joe F Bolanos,3 Nam-Young Kim,4 Ajeet Kaushik5 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jerry H. Hodge School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC), Amarillo, TX 79106, USA; 2Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS), Nashik, Maharashtra 422004, India; 3Facultad De Ciencias De La Salud “Dr.Luis Edmundo Vasquez” Santa Tecla, Universidad Dr. Jose Matias Delgado, Cd Merliot, El Salvador; 4RFIC Bio Center, Department of Electronics Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897, South Korea; 5NanoBioTech Laboratory, Department of Natural Sciences, Division of Sciences, Art, and Mathematics, Florida Polytechnic University, Lakeland, FL 3385, USACorrespondence: Ajeet KaushikNanoBioTech Laboratory, Department of Natural Sciences, Division of Sciences, Art, and Mathematics, Florida Polytechnic University, Lakeland, FL 3385, USAEmail akaushik@floridapoly.eduAbstract: The newly emerged ribonucleic acid (RNA) enveloped human beta-coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection caused the COVID-19 pandemic, severely affects the respiratory system, and may lead to death. Lacking effective diagnostics and therapies made this pandemic challenging to manage since the SARS-CoV-2 transmits via human-to-human, enters via ACE2 and TMPSSR2 receptors, and damages organs rich in host cells, spreads via symptomatic carriers and is prominent in an immune-compromised population. New SARS-CoV-2 informatics (structure, strains, like-cycles, functional sites) motivated bio-pharma experts to investigate novel therapeutic agents that act to recognize, inhibit, and knockdown combinations of drugs, vaccines, and antibodies, have been optimized to manage COVID-19. However, successful targeted delivery of these agents to avoid off-targeting and unnecessary drug ingestion is very challenging. To overcome these obstacles, this mini-review projects nanomedicine technology, a pharmacologically relevant cargo of size within 10 to 200 nm, for site-specific delivery of a therapeutic agent to recognize and eradicate the SARS-CoV-2, and improving the human immune system. Such combinational therapy based on compartmentalization controls the delivery and releases of a drug optimized based on patient genomic profile and medical history. Nanotechnology could help combat COVID-19 via various methods such as avoiding viral contamination and spraying by developing personal protective equipment (PPE) to increase the protection of healthcare workers and produce effective antiviral disinfectants surface coatings capable of inactivating and preventing the virus from spreading. To quickly recognize the infection or immunological response, design highly accurate and sensitive nano-based sensors. Development of new drugs with improved activity, reduced toxicity, and sustained release to the lungs, as well as tissue targets; and development of nano-based immunizations to improve humoral and cellular immune responses. The desired and controlled features of suggested personalized therapeutics, nanomedicine, is a potential therapy to manage COVID-19 successfully. The state-of-the-art nanomedicine, challenges, and prospects of nanomedicine are carefully and critically discussed in this report, which may serve as a key platform for scholars to investigate the role of nanomedicine for higher efficacy to manage the COVID-19 pandemic.Keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2 viral infection, nanomedicine, personalized COVID-19 management, drug delivery

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Manuel Cardona; Fernando Cortez; Andres Palacios; Kevin Cerros;
    Publisher: Editorial Universidad Don Bosco
    Country: El Salvador

    This article presents an investigation about the different applications of mobile robots in the fight against the Covid- 19 pandemic. It shows the different contributions of companies around the world that seek to adapt to the new needs in order to be able to mitigate the progress of the Covid-19 using mobile robots as a tool, focusing primarily in the area of health and service.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anita Cicero; Diane Meyer; Matthew P. Shearer; Sazaly AbuBakar; Ken Bernard; W. Seth Carus; Chee Kheong Chong; Julie E. Fischer; Noreen A. Hynes; Thomas V. Inglesby; +9 more
    Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    A strategic multilateral dialogue related to biosecurity risks in Southeast Asia, established in 2014, now includes participants from Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, and the United States. This dialogue is conducted at the nonministerial level, enabling participants to engage without the constraints of operating in their official capacities. Participants reflect on mechanisms to detect, mitigate, and respond to biosecurity risks and highlight biosecurity issues for national leadership. Participants have also identified factors to improve regional and global biosecurity, including improved engagement and collaboration across relevant ministries and agencies, sustainable funding for biosecurity programs, enhanced information sharing for communicable diseases, and increased engagement in international biosecurity forums.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bounlay Phommasack; Chuleeporn Jiraphongsa; Moe Ko Oo; Katherine C. Bond; Natalie Phaholyothin; Rapeepong Suphanchaimat; Kumnuan Ungchusak; Sarah B. Macfarlane;
    Publisher: Emerging Health Threats Journal

    The Mekong Basin Disease Surveillance (MBDS) network was formally established in 2001 through a Memorandum of Understanding signed by six Ministers of Health of the countries in the Greater Mekong sub-region: Cambodia, China (Yunnan and Guangxi), Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. The main areas of focus of the network are to: i) improve cross-border infectious disease outbreak investigation and response by sharing surveillance data and best practices in disease recognition and reporting, and by jointly responding to outbreaks; ii) develop expertise in epidemiological surveillance across the countries; and iii) enhance communication between the countries. Comprised of senior health officials, epidemiologists, health practitioners, and other professionals, the MBDS has grown and matured over the years into an entity based on mutual trust that can be sustained into the future. Other regions have started emulating the network's pioneering work. In this paper, we describe the development of MBDS, the way in which it operates today, and some of its achievements. We present key challenges the network has faced and lessons its members have learned about how to develop sufficient trust for health and other professionals to alert each other to disease threats across national borders and thereby more effectively combat these threats. Keywords: MBDS; trust-based collaboration; Mekong Basin; infectious disease surveillance; regional network; cross-border; human resource; outbreak investigation and response; FETP; epidemiological capacity (Published: 25 January 2013) Citation: Emerg Health Threats J 2013, 6 : 19944 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ehtj.v6i0.19944