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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
851 Research products, page 1 of 86

  • COVID-19
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  • 2017-2021
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  • English
    Authors: 
    Hintermann, Christian; Cloughesy, Kevin; Rosenast, Guido; Laamanen, Tomi; Isenring-Szabó, Kata; Maureau, Galdric; Ruhstaller, Stefan;
    Publisher: KPMG AG Schweiz
    Country: Switzerland

    The crisis came after a period of generally favorable financial markets in 2019, which had already built greater confidence among Swiss banks. As a result of the Covid-19 related lockdown, banks swiftly implemented crisis management measures. This enabled them to continue serving clients from home offices without significant disruption. The speed with which change has been implemented following the lockdown - and the benefits this change has already begun to produce - has given banks the confidence that change is possible, and that it can deliver tangible results in a very short timeframe.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dempsey, Majella; Burke, Jolanta;
    Publisher: Maynooth University
    Country: Ireland

    This research report looks at leadership and wellbeing in Primary Schools two months after the COVID-19 school closures, in total 939 leaders completed the survey. It follows a previous report on practice in Primary Schools two weeks after school closures (Burke and Dempsey, 2020). It reports on the changes in communication, concerns and wellbeing from week two to month two after the COVID-19 school closure; the wellbeing of school leaders in the middle of the COVID-19 school closure; and, investigates the intricacies in wellbeing between teaching and administrative principals, given that their daily duties differ significantly. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS, and qualitative data was analysed using MAXQDA. It found that principals are adapting to the impact of the pandemic, both professionally and personally, however there have been significant challenges noted. It was noted that social wellbeing is the biggest challenge for principals, however seven out of 10 principals have taken specific actions to address this challenge during the lockdown. Lack of time was an issue for those principals who have not taken positive action regarding their wellbeing, with some fulfilling multiple professional and personal roles. While there have been challenges associated with the adaptation and implementation of new online practices, and some schools lack technology, there has been a positive move to online learning.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Allen, Ruth; Wiśniowski, Arkadiusz; Aparicio-Castro, Andrea; Olsen, Wendy; Islam, Maydul;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This rapid review summarises the economic impacts of the pandemic on ethnic minorities, focusing on the city of Manchester. It utilises multiple reporting sources to explore various dimensions of the economic shock in the UK, linking this to studies of pre-COVID-19 economic and ethnic composition in Manchester and in the combined authority area of Greater Manchester. We then make inferences about the pandemic’s impact specific to the city region. Greater Manchester has seen some of the highest rates of COVID-19 and as a result has faced particularly stringent 'lockdown' regulations.Manchester is the sixth most deprived Local Authority in England (according to 2019 English Indices of Multiple Deprivation). As a consequence, many neighbourhoods in the city were always going to be less resilient to the economic shock caused by the pandemic compared with other, less-deprived, areas. Particular challenges for Manchester include the prevalence of poor health, low-paid work, low qualifications, poor housing conditions and overcrowding. Ethnic minority groups also faced disparities long before the onset of the pandemic. Within the UK, ethnic minorities have been found to be most disadvantaged in terms of employment and housing – particularly in large urban areas containing traditional settlement areas for ethnic minorities. Further, all Black, Asian, and Minority ethnic (BAME) groups in Greater Manchester have been found to be less likely to be employed pre-pandemic compared with White people. For example, people of Pakistani and Bangladeshi ethnic backgrounds, especially women, have the lowest levels of employment in Greater Manchester. Finally, unprecedented cuts to public spending as a result of austerity have also disproportionately affected women of an ethnic minority background alongside women, disabled people, the young and those with no or low-level qualifications. This environment has created and sustained a multiplicative disadvantage for Manchester’s ethnic minority residents through the course of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cazenave, Tristan; Teytaud, Olivier; Winands, Mark H.M.;
    Publisher: Springer, Cham
    Country: Netherlands

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First Workshop on Monte Carlo Search, MCS 2020, organized in conjunction with IJCAI 2020. The event was supposed to take place in Yokohama, Japan, in July 2020, but due to the Covid-19 pandemic was held virtually on January 7, 2021. The 9 full papers of the specialized project were carefully reviewed and selected from 15 submissions. The following topics are covered in the contributions: discrete mathematics in computer science, games, optimization, search algorithms, Monte Carlo methods, neural networks, reinforcement learning, machine learning.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chew Cheng Hoon; Yip Yan Yee; Mohd Saleh Syahirah Farhana; Ishak Khairul Nisa'; Muhamad Nawawai Anis Suraya; Chew Chun Keat; Chow Ting Soo; Lim Richard Boon Leong; Goh Bak Leong; Goh Pik Pin; +1 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The COVID-19 pandemic started more than a year ago, but until today, we did not have a definitive cure for this disease. The SARS-CoV-2 virus constantly mutated over time, infecting more people and causing tremendous stress on the existing scarcity of healthcare resources all around the world. Here, the experts from ground zero will share their first-hand experience of clinical trials looking for a cure for COVID-19, like the WHO's Solidarity Trial and the role of palliative care in COVID-19 as part of humanitarian crisis management. To download this eBook in other formats, please go to https://books2read.com/u/3ya9rn or https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1103401

  • Publication . Book . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Raffaele Manna; Antonio Pascucci; Wanda Punzi Zarino; Vincenzo Simoniello; Johanna Monti;
    Publisher: Accademia University Press
    Country: Italy

    This paper presents the results of research carried out on the UNIOR Eye corpus, a corpus which has been built by downloading tweets related to environmental crimes. The corpus is made up of 228,412 tweets organized into four different subsections, each one concerning a specific environmental crime. For the current study we focused on the subsection of waste crimes, composed of 86,206 tweets which were tagged according to the two labels alert and no alert. The aim is to build a model able to detect which class a tweet belongs to.

  • Publication . Book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: International Association for the Study of Popular Music
    Country: Germany

    This Special Issue is motivated by, but not limited to, the current processes and effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the global civic rights movement related to “Black Lives Matter”, which highlights systemic racism as an epidemic in many societies around the world. It gathers a broad range of scholarly and artistic perspectives on crises in popular music composition and production, labour, business, education, societies and cultures. It contains five articles, four statements on the crises specificities from different parts of the world, one of which in podcast format, and two book reviews.

  • Publication . Book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Paor-Evans, Adam; Palmer, Luke;
    Publisher: Squagle House
    Country: United Kingdom

    It was Thursday 12th March 2020, a day when severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2, or COVID-19 as it became commonly known, was still relatively minor news in Bristol, England. At the time there were no more than 500 cases within the UK and fewer than a handful of fatalities. I had barely given it a second thought, my diary was filling up and there was work to do; a growing number of Collaborative Painting UK workshops to facilitate, large-scale office murals to paint, and showcases at festivals to organise. Summer 2020 was shaping up to be the break I had been working so hard to secure ever since quitting my job as a lecturer two years earlier.\ud \ud I was on my way to meet my friend and fellow artist Felix Braun at the Royal West of England Academy (RWA) to finalise plans for our co-curation of the ‘Streets Ahead’ exhibition, a full gallery takeover during the summer, showcasing 20 local contemporary artists exploring the future of street art. As I climbed the huge marble staircase, Felix came into view. He was sat at a table, but looked slightly odd. I then realised he was wearing blue rubber gloves, the kind I wear when spray-painting \ud murals and canvases. I mentally made the connection to COVID-19 and shot him a wry smile in recognition of his vehement health and safety efforts. “I’ll offer no apology,” he said without hesitation, “I’ll do everything I can to not spread this thing.”\ud \ud Challenges were addressed, exhibiting artists’ progress discussed and further plans were made before we left the building and wandered outside into the unusually warm early springtime sunshine. Felix spoke up and told me of his concern that Coronavirus might actually stop the exhibition happening at all. My wry smile turned into a nervous laugh. This simply was not a possibility in my mind. We owed it to the artists to make the show happen, we had all done so much work towards it already, and surely this was just a flu variant that would pass in no time at all. I looked him square in the eye: “It’ll be fine…\ud you worry too much.”\ud \ud As I returned to my car, I checked my phone and opened a new email. It was from a client for whom I was working the following week, facilitating a Collaborative Painting workshop for 60 participants underneath the wings of Concorde at Bristol Aerospace Museum: “Due to many of our colleagues travelling from various countries around Europe, we regret to inform you that we are cancelling all of our plans to hold our event in Bristol next week.” My heart sank and my palms began to sweat. Could Felix have been right to have been so cautious?\ud \ud Eleven days later on the 23rd March 2020, the United \ud Kingdom was put into full lockdown and every citizen \ud in the country was ordered to stay at home, only being \ud permitted to leave for a short amount of exercise, \ud essential shopping and work that could not be done \ud from home. One by one, the cancellations came in until \ud my diary was completely clear again; no workshops, no \ud festivals, no commissions, and no RWA exhibition. I felt \ud like everything I had worked for was slipping away and \ud there was nothing I could do to stop it.\ud \ud How was I to save Collaborative Painting UK, and more \ud importantly, my sanity, during a pandemic that made \ud contact with humans outside of my own immediate \ud family, effectively illegal?\ud \ud This book is a document of the small, personalised \ud projects I facilitated between April 2020 and April 2021, \ud an entire year during which the United Kingdom was \ud subjected to varying degrees of lockdown restrictions. \ud Its content is divided into two main sections, Lockdown \ud Collaborations: a series of canvases and digital images \ud that I started and then passed on to other visual artists \ud to complete, and #A4FOR5: a team activity whereby six \ud people each make five new artworks at A4 size and then \ud distribute them a week later to the rest of their group.\ud \ud These projects were not pre-planned. They were a \ud spontaneous response to losing my usual practice of \ud facilitating team-building workshops, art projects for \ud young people and community groups, and delivering \ud arts in health sessions for inpatients at Bristol Children’s \ud Hospital. For reasons associated with my own mental \ud health, I needed to keep myself busy, engaged with \ud making art, connected other creative people, and most \ud importantly remain feeling like I was still an active artist. \ud As the months passed, the entire world was bombarded \ud on a daily basis with ascending line graphs, terrifying \ud statistics and real life stories of pain, loss, and struggling \ud just to get by, the only comfort being a shared \ud knowingness that we were all fighting the same battle \ud together, despite being as unprepared and unsure of \ud what would happen next as each other.\ud \ud Developing systems to facilitate new ways to collaborate \ud with other artists began as a selfish act, imagined solely \ud to give me a reason to keep painting, keep conversations \ud with other artists going, and to have some positive \ud outcomes to look forward to. To begin with, I hadn’t \ud considered the effects these small projects would have \ud on my collaborators, but soon I would receive feedback \ud from participants informing me that the lockdown \ud collaborations were affecting more than just my own \ud need to keep active.\ud \ud Luke Palmer/Acerone\ud May 2021.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dayson, Christopher; Batty, Elaine;
    Publisher: Sheffield Hallam University, Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Publication . Book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Zdravstvena fakulteta
    Country: Slovenia

    The publication covers scientific research in the field of biophysics, ecology, physiotherapy and the COVID-19 epidemic. Zbornik pokriva znanstveno raziskovanje s področja biofizike, ekologije, fizioterapije in epidemije COVID-19.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
851 Research products, page 1 of 86
  • English
    Authors: 
    Hintermann, Christian; Cloughesy, Kevin; Rosenast, Guido; Laamanen, Tomi; Isenring-Szabó, Kata; Maureau, Galdric; Ruhstaller, Stefan;
    Publisher: KPMG AG Schweiz
    Country: Switzerland

    The crisis came after a period of generally favorable financial markets in 2019, which had already built greater confidence among Swiss banks. As a result of the Covid-19 related lockdown, banks swiftly implemented crisis management measures. This enabled them to continue serving clients from home offices without significant disruption. The speed with which change has been implemented following the lockdown - and the benefits this change has already begun to produce - has given banks the confidence that change is possible, and that it can deliver tangible results in a very short timeframe.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dempsey, Majella; Burke, Jolanta;
    Publisher: Maynooth University
    Country: Ireland

    This research report looks at leadership and wellbeing in Primary Schools two months after the COVID-19 school closures, in total 939 leaders completed the survey. It follows a previous report on practice in Primary Schools two weeks after school closures (Burke and Dempsey, 2020). It reports on the changes in communication, concerns and wellbeing from week two to month two after the COVID-19 school closure; the wellbeing of school leaders in the middle of the COVID-19 school closure; and, investigates the intricacies in wellbeing between teaching and administrative principals, given that their daily duties differ significantly. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS, and qualitative data was analysed using MAXQDA. It found that principals are adapting to the impact of the pandemic, both professionally and personally, however there have been significant challenges noted. It was noted that social wellbeing is the biggest challenge for principals, however seven out of 10 principals have taken specific actions to address this challenge during the lockdown. Lack of time was an issue for those principals who have not taken positive action regarding their wellbeing, with some fulfilling multiple professional and personal roles. While there have been challenges associated with the adaptation and implementation of new online practices, and some schools lack technology, there has been a positive move to online learning.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Allen, Ruth; Wiśniowski, Arkadiusz; Aparicio-Castro, Andrea; Olsen, Wendy; Islam, Maydul;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This rapid review summarises the economic impacts of the pandemic on ethnic minorities, focusing on the city of Manchester. It utilises multiple reporting sources to explore various dimensions of the economic shock in the UK, linking this to studies of pre-COVID-19 economic and ethnic composition in Manchester and in the combined authority area of Greater Manchester. We then make inferences about the pandemic’s impact specific to the city region. Greater Manchester has seen some of the highest rates of COVID-19 and as a result has faced particularly stringent 'lockdown' regulations.Manchester is the sixth most deprived Local Authority in England (according to 2019 English Indices of Multiple Deprivation). As a consequence, many neighbourhoods in the city were always going to be less resilient to the economic shock caused by the pandemic compared with other, less-deprived, areas. Particular challenges for Manchester include the prevalence of poor health, low-paid work, low qualifications, poor housing conditions and overcrowding. Ethnic minority groups also faced disparities long before the onset of the pandemic. Within the UK, ethnic minorities have been found to be most disadvantaged in terms of employment and housing – particularly in large urban areas containing traditional settlement areas for ethnic minorities. Further, all Black, Asian, and Minority ethnic (BAME) groups in Greater Manchester have been found to be less likely to be employed pre-pandemic compared with White people. For example, people of Pakistani and Bangladeshi ethnic backgrounds, especially women, have the lowest levels of employment in Greater Manchester. Finally, unprecedented cuts to public spending as a result of austerity have also disproportionately affected women of an ethnic minority background alongside women, disabled people, the young and those with no or low-level qualifications. This environment has created and sustained a multiplicative disadvantage for Manchester’s ethnic minority residents through the course of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cazenave, Tristan; Teytaud, Olivier; Winands, Mark H.M.;
    Publisher: Springer, Cham
    Country: Netherlands

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First Workshop on Monte Carlo Search, MCS 2020, organized in conjunction with IJCAI 2020. The event was supposed to take place in Yokohama, Japan, in July 2020, but due to the Covid-19 pandemic was held virtually on January 7, 2021. The 9 full papers of the specialized project were carefully reviewed and selected from 15 submissions. The following topics are covered in the contributions: discrete mathematics in computer science, games, optimization, search algorithms, Monte Carlo methods, neural networks, reinforcement learning, machine learning.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chew Cheng Hoon; Yip Yan Yee; Mohd Saleh Syahirah Farhana; Ishak Khairul Nisa'; Muhamad Nawawai Anis Suraya; Chew Chun Keat; Chow Ting Soo; Lim Richard Boon Leong; Goh Bak Leong; Goh Pik Pin; +1 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The COVID-19 pandemic started more than a year ago, but until today, we did not have a definitive cure for this disease. The SARS-CoV-2 virus constantly mutated over time, infecting more people and causing tremendous stress on the existing scarcity of healthcare resources all around the world. Here, the experts from ground zero will share their first-hand experience of clinical trials looking for a cure for COVID-19, like the WHO's Solidarity Trial and the role of palliative care in COVID-19 as part of humanitarian crisis management. To download this eBook in other formats, please go to https://books2read.com/u/3ya9rn or https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1103401

  • Publication . Book . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Raffaele Manna; Antonio Pascucci; Wanda Punzi Zarino; Vincenzo Simoniello; Johanna Monti;
    Publisher: Accademia University Press
    Country: Italy

    This paper presents the results of research carried out on the UNIOR Eye corpus, a corpus which has been built by downloading tweets related to environmental crimes. The corpus is made up of 228,412 tweets organized into four different subsections, each one concerning a specific environmental crime. For the current study we focused on the subsection of waste crimes, composed of 86,206 tweets which were tagged according to the two labels alert and no alert. The aim is to build a model able to detect which class a tweet belongs to.

  • Publication . Book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: International Association for the Study of Popular Music
    Country: Germany

    This Special Issue is motivated by, but not limited to, the current processes and effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the global civic rights movement related to “Black Lives Matter”, which highlights systemic racism as an epidemic in many societies around the world. It gathers a broad range of scholarly and artistic perspectives on crises in popular music composition and production, labour, business, education, societies and cultures. It contains five articles, four statements on the crises specificities from different parts of the world, one of which in podcast format, and two book reviews.

  • Publication . Book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Paor-Evans, Adam; Palmer, Luke;
    Publisher: Squagle House
    Country: United Kingdom

    It was Thursday 12th March 2020, a day when severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2, or COVID-19 as it became commonly known, was still relatively minor news in Bristol, England. At the time there were no more than 500 cases within the UK and fewer than a handful of fatalities. I had barely given it a second thought, my diary was filling up and there was work to do; a growing number of Collaborative Painting UK workshops to facilitate, large-scale office murals to paint, and showcases at festivals to organise. Summer 2020 was shaping up to be the break I had been working so hard to secure ever since quitting my job as a lecturer two years earlier.\ud \ud I was on my way to meet my friend and fellow artist Felix Braun at the Royal West of England Academy (RWA) to finalise plans for our co-curation of the ‘Streets Ahead’ exhibition, a full gallery takeover during the summer, showcasing 20 local contemporary artists exploring the future of street art. As I climbed the huge marble staircase, Felix came into view. He was sat at a table, but looked slightly odd. I then realised he was wearing blue rubber gloves, the kind I wear when spray-painting \ud murals and canvases. I mentally made the connection to COVID-19 and shot him a wry smile in recognition of his vehement health and safety efforts. “I’ll offer no apology,” he said without hesitation, “I’ll do everything I can to not spread this thing.”\ud \ud Challenges were addressed, exhibiting artists’ progress discussed and further plans were made before we left the building and wandered outside into the unusually warm early springtime sunshine. Felix spoke up and told me of his concern that Coronavirus might actually stop the exhibition happening at all. My wry smile turned into a nervous laugh. This simply was not a possibility in my mind. We owed it to the artists to make the show happen, we had all done so much work towards it already, and surely this was just a flu variant that would pass in no time at all. I looked him square in the eye: “It’ll be fine…\ud you worry too much.”\ud \ud As I returned to my car, I checked my phone and opened a new email. It was from a client for whom I was working the following week, facilitating a Collaborative Painting workshop for 60 participants underneath the wings of Concorde at Bristol Aerospace Museum: “Due to many of our colleagues travelling from various countries around Europe, we regret to inform you that we are cancelling all of our plans to hold our event in Bristol next week.” My heart sank and my palms began to sweat. Could Felix have been right to have been so cautious?\ud \ud Eleven days later on the 23rd March 2020, the United \ud Kingdom was put into full lockdown and every citizen \ud in the country was ordered to stay at home, only being \ud permitted to leave for a short amount of exercise, \ud essential shopping and work that could not be done \ud from home. One by one, the cancellations came in until \ud my diary was completely clear again; no workshops, no \ud festivals, no commissions, and no RWA exhibition. I felt \ud like everything I had worked for was slipping away and \ud there was nothing I could do to stop it.\ud \ud How was I to save Collaborative Painting UK, and more \ud importantly, my sanity, during a pandemic that made \ud contact with humans outside of my own immediate \ud family, effectively illegal?\ud \ud This book is a document of the small, personalised \ud projects I facilitated between April 2020 and April 2021, \ud an entire year during which the United Kingdom was \ud subjected to varying degrees of lockdown restrictions. \ud Its content is divided into two main sections, Lockdown \ud Collaborations: a series of canvases and digital images \ud that I started and then passed on to other visual artists \ud to complete, and #A4FOR5: a team activity whereby six \ud people each make five new artworks at A4 size and then \ud distribute them a week later to the rest of their group.\ud \ud These projects were not pre-planned. They were a \ud spontaneous response to losing my usual practice of \ud facilitating team-building workshops, art projects for \ud young people and community groups, and delivering \ud arts in health sessions for inpatients at Bristol Children’s \ud Hospital. For reasons associated with my own mental \ud health, I needed to keep myself busy, engaged with \ud making art, connected other creative people, and most \ud importantly remain feeling like I was still an active artist. \ud As the months passed, the entire world was bombarded \ud on a daily basis with ascending line graphs, terrifying \ud statistics and real life stories of pain, loss, and struggling \ud just to get by, the only comfort being a shared \ud knowingness that we were all fighting the same battle \ud together, despite being as unprepared and unsure of \ud what would happen next as each other.\ud \ud Developing systems to facilitate new ways to collaborate \ud with other artists began as a selfish act, imagined solely \ud to give me a reason to keep painting, keep conversations \ud with other artists going, and to have some positive \ud outcomes to look forward to. To begin with, I hadn’t \ud considered the effects these small projects would have \ud on my collaborators, but soon I would receive feedback \ud from participants informing me that the lockdown \ud collaborations were affecting more than just my own \ud need to keep active.\ud \ud Luke Palmer/Acerone\ud May 2021.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dayson, Christopher; Batty, Elaine;
    Publisher: Sheffield Hallam University, Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Publication . Book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Zdravstvena fakulteta
    Country: Slovenia

    The publication covers scientific research in the field of biophysics, ecology, physiotherapy and the COVID-19 epidemic. Zbornik pokriva znanstveno raziskovanje s področja biofizike, ekologije, fizioterapije in epidemije COVID-19.