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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • COVID-19
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  • Article
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  • Journal of Business Venturing Insights

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sara Thorgren; Trenton A. Williams;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    What measures are SMEs most likely to take in order to make ends meet in the face of a “black swan” external shock? That is the question we explore in this study, drawing upon unique data from 456 SMEs in the midst of an unfolding crisis. Our findings demonstrate how SMEs acted immediately by deferring investments, reducing labor costs, reducing expenses, and negotiating contracts and terms. Moreover, the data highlight how SMEs in an unfolding crisis are reluctant to commit to any action that will increase their debt-to-equity ratio. The findings suggest new questions to be explored in relation to actions during an unfolding crisis, post-crisis businesses, entrepreneurial failure, and entrepreneur/entrepreneurial team characteristics. Implications for policy and practice are provided. Highlights • SMEs focused upon reducing negative cash flow and tied-up capital. • SMEs refrained from increasing their debt-to-equity ratio. • SMEs rarely responded to the crisis by innovation and revenue focused actions. • Surprisingly many SMEs did not take any immediate actions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Katharina Scheidgen; Ali Aslan Gümüsay; Franziska Günzel-Jensen; Gorgi Krlev; Miriam Wolf;
    Countries: Denmark, Germany

    Abstract As physical distancing is a core measure of containing the spread of COVID-19, this pandemic is a crisis that has uprooted social interaction. While current research mainly focuses on crises as a challenge for entrepreneurial ventures and potential regulatory response mechanisms, we complement this research by addressing the question of how crises in general—and COVID-19’s physical distancing measures in particular—shape entrepreneurial opportunities for social innovation. Based on two rounds of data collection—desktop research mapping out 95 entrepreneurial activities in Germany and four focus groups—we find first that entrepreneurs are proactive agents in alleviating the negative consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. They do so by creating two types of digital social innovation: digital brokering and digitized services. Second, we note that negative societal consequences of crises can be buffered by shifts in entrepreneurs’ strategic orientation through improvised venturing, rapid pivoting and pro-social product extension. Third, we note variance in the persistence of changes with consequences for entrepreneurial opportunities and social innovation: Whereas some social innovation are rather ephemeral, others might endure and promise long-term impacts. We offer key insights for the literature on crisis, social innovation and hybrid organizing as well as on the implications for entrepreneurship practice and policy.

Advanced search in Research products
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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sara Thorgren; Trenton A. Williams;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    What measures are SMEs most likely to take in order to make ends meet in the face of a “black swan” external shock? That is the question we explore in this study, drawing upon unique data from 456 SMEs in the midst of an unfolding crisis. Our findings demonstrate how SMEs acted immediately by deferring investments, reducing labor costs, reducing expenses, and negotiating contracts and terms. Moreover, the data highlight how SMEs in an unfolding crisis are reluctant to commit to any action that will increase their debt-to-equity ratio. The findings suggest new questions to be explored in relation to actions during an unfolding crisis, post-crisis businesses, entrepreneurial failure, and entrepreneur/entrepreneurial team characteristics. Implications for policy and practice are provided. Highlights • SMEs focused upon reducing negative cash flow and tied-up capital. • SMEs refrained from increasing their debt-to-equity ratio. • SMEs rarely responded to the crisis by innovation and revenue focused actions. • Surprisingly many SMEs did not take any immediate actions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Katharina Scheidgen; Ali Aslan Gümüsay; Franziska Günzel-Jensen; Gorgi Krlev; Miriam Wolf;
    Countries: Denmark, Germany

    Abstract As physical distancing is a core measure of containing the spread of COVID-19, this pandemic is a crisis that has uprooted social interaction. While current research mainly focuses on crises as a challenge for entrepreneurial ventures and potential regulatory response mechanisms, we complement this research by addressing the question of how crises in general—and COVID-19’s physical distancing measures in particular—shape entrepreneurial opportunities for social innovation. Based on two rounds of data collection—desktop research mapping out 95 entrepreneurial activities in Germany and four focus groups—we find first that entrepreneurs are proactive agents in alleviating the negative consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. They do so by creating two types of digital social innovation: digital brokering and digitized services. Second, we note that negative societal consequences of crises can be buffered by shifts in entrepreneurs’ strategic orientation through improvised venturing, rapid pivoting and pro-social product extension. Third, we note variance in the persistence of changes with consequences for entrepreneurial opportunities and social innovation: Whereas some social innovation are rather ephemeral, others might endure and promise long-term impacts. We offer key insights for the literature on crisis, social innovation and hybrid organizing as well as on the implications for entrepreneurship practice and policy.