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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
323 Research products, page 1 of 33

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
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  • 2021-2021
  • Open Access
  • DK
  • University of Southern Denmark Research Output

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Inge K. Holden; Claus Bistrup; Anna Nilsson; Janne Fuglsang Hansen; Rozeta Abazi; Jesper Rømhild Davidsen; Mikael Kjær Poulsen; Susan Olaf Lindvig; Ulrik Stenz Justesen; Isik Somuncu Johansen;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Denmark

    Background It is currently not well described if a two-dose regimen of a Covid-19 vaccine is sufficient to elicit an immune response in SOT recipients. Results A total of 80 solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients completed a two-dose regimen with SARS-CoV-2 messenger RNA vaccine. Only 35.0% (n = 28) were able to mount a positive IgG immune response six weeks after the second dose of vaccine. Conclusion This emphasizes that SOT recipients need continued use of personal protective measures. Future studies need to closely examine the cellular immune response in patients with compromised antibody response to Covid-19 vaccination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kenneth Lundstrom; Debmalya Barh; Bruce D. Uhal; Kazuo Takayama; Alaa A. A. Aljabali; Tarek Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Amos Lal; Elrashdy M. Redwan; Parise Adadi; Gaurav Chauhan; +16 more
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Materialteori
    Countries: Sweden, Denmark

    Two adenovirus-based vaccines, ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and Ad26.COV2.S, and two mRNA-based vaccines, BNT162b2 and mRNA.1273, have been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and are invaluable in preventing and reducing the incidence of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Recent reports have pointed to thrombosis with associated thrombocytopenia as an adverse effect occurring at a low frequency in some individuals after vaccination. The causes of such events may be related to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein interactions with different C-type lectin receptors, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and the CD147 receptor, or to different soluble splice variants of the spike protein, adenovirus vector interactions with the CD46 receptor or platelet factor 4 antibodies. Similar findings have been reported for several viral diseases after vaccine administration. In addition, immunological mechanisms elicited by viral vectors related to cellular delivery could play a relevant role in individuals with certain genetic backgrounds. Although rare, the potential COVID-19 vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) requires immediate validation, especially in risk groups, such as the elderly, chronic smokers, and individuals with pre-existing incidences of thrombocytopenia; and if necessary, a reformulation of existing vaccines.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Qvortrup, Ane; Lomholt, Rune;
    Publisher: Syddansk Universitet. Institut for Kulturvidenskaber
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kamille Fogh; Jarl E. Strange; Bibi F. S. S. Scharff; Alexandra R. R. Eriksen; Rasmus B. Hasselbalch; Henning Bundgaard; Susanne D. Nielsen; Charlotte S. Jørgensen; Christian Erikstrup; Jakob Norsk; +24 more
    Country: Denmark

    "Testing Denmark" is a national, large-scale, epidemiological surveillance study of SARS-CoV-2 in the Danish population. Between September and October 2020, approximately 1.3 million people (age >15 years) were randomly invited to fill in an electronic questionnaire covering COVID-19 exposures and symptoms. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was determined by point-of care rapid test (POCT) distributed to participants' home addresses. In total, 318,552 participants (24.5% invitees) completed the study and 2,519 (0.79%) were seropositive. Of the participants with a prior positive PCR test (n = 1,828), 29.1% were seropositive in the POCT. Although seropositivity increased with age, participants 61 years and over reported fewer symptoms and were tested less frequently. Seropositivity was associated with physical contact with SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals (risk ratio [RR] 7.43, 95% CI: 6.57-8.41), particular in household members (RR 17.70, 95% CI: 15.60-20.10). A greater risk of seropositivity was seen in home care workers (RR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.58-2.78) compared to office workers. A high degree of adherence with national preventive recommendations was reported (e.g., >80% use of face masks), but no difference were found between seropositive and seronegative participants. The seroprevalence result was somewhat hampered by a lower-than-expected performance of the POCT. This is likely due to a low sensitivity of the POCT or problems reading the test results, and the main findings therefore relate to risk associations. More emphasis should be placed on age, occupation, and exposure in local communities. IMPORTANCE To date, including 318,522 participants, this is the largest population-based study with broad national participation where tests and questionnaires have been sent to participants' homes. We found that more emphasis from national and local authorities toward the risk of infection should be placed on age of tested individuals, type of occupation, as well as exposure in local communities and households. To meet the challenge that broad nationwide information can be difficult to gather. This study design sets the stage for a novel way of conducting studies. Additionally, this study design can be used as a supplementary model in future general test strategy for ongoing monitoring of COVID-19 immunity in the population, both from past infection and from vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, however, with attention to the complexity of performing and reading the POCT at home.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hans Eguia; Franco Vinciarelli; Marina Bosque-Prous; Troels Kristensen; Francesc Saigí-Rubió;
    Countries: Spain, Denmark

    (1) Background: This study aims to delineate a pattern on vaccine hesitancy in a sample of the Spanish population, considering age groups and status as healthcare workers. (2) Methods: Participants were recruited using Twitter® as a dissemination tool to reach as many respondents as possible in different parts of the Spanish territory. The participants were recruited in a cross-sectional study, which included answering an online questionnaire. Data were collected from 10 September through 23 November 2020. Respondents answered questions asking whether they intended to be vaccinated and provided the main reason for their answers. To estimate associations between vaccination hesitancy and independent variables, we fit Poisson regression models with robust variance. (3) Results: One thousand and two responses were obtained, of which only 731 were validated. One hundred and sixty-four participants stated that they would not be vaccinated (22.43%), of which 20–24% were non-health workers or unemployed, 17.5% physicians, 31.5% other health workers, and almost 35% nurses. Concerns about lack of effectiveness of the vaccination, lack of safety when vaccinating and possibly dangerous adverse effects were the main causes provided. (4) Conclusions: This study indicates that more interventions are needed to achieve better communication with the population and health professionals. Receptiveness to the message of the importance and security of the COVID-19 vaccination could be an important strategy for improving these results.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Heiberg Brix; Laszlo Hegedüs; Jesper Hallas; Lars Christian Lund;
    Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Caroline Klint Johannesen; Omid Rezahosseini; Mikkel Gybel-Brask; Jonas H Kristensen; Rasmus Bo Hasselbalch; Mia Pries-Heje; Pernille B Nielsen; Andreas Knudsen; Kamille Fogh; Jakob B Norsk; +21 more
    Country: Denmark

    ABSTRACT Most individuals seroconvert after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but being seronegative is observed in 1 to 9%. We aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with being seronegative following PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. In a prospective cohort study, we screened health care workers (HCW) in the Capital Region of Denmark for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. We performed three rounds of screening from April to October 2020 using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method targeting SARS-CoV-2 total antibodies. Data on all participants’ PCR for SARS-CoV-2 RNA were captured from national registries. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models were applied to investigate the probability of being seronegative and the related risk factors, respectively. Of 36,583 HCW, 866 (2.4%) had a positive PCR before or during the study period. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 866 HCW was 42 (31 to 53) years, and 666 (77%) were female. After a median of 132 (range, 35 to 180) days, 21 (2.4%) of 866 were seronegative. In a multivariable model, independent risk factors for being seronegative were self-reported asymptomatic or mild infection hazard ratio (HR) of 6.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6 to 17; P < 0.001) and body mass index (BMI) of ≥30, HR 3.1 (95% CI, 1.1 to 8.8; P = 0.039). Only a few (2.4%) HCW were not seropositive. Asymptomatic or mild infection as well as a BMI above 30 were associated with being seronegative. Since the presence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 reduces the risk of reinfection, efforts to protect HCW with risk factors for being seronegative may be needed in future COVID-19 surges. IMPORTANCE Most individuals seroconvert after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but negative serology is observed in 1 to 9%. We found that asymptomatic or mild infection as well as a BMI above 30 were associated with being seronegative. Since the presence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 reduces the risk of reinfection, efforts to protect HCW with risk factors for being seronegative may be needed in future COVID-19 surges.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Qvortrup, Ane; Lundtofte, Thomas Enemark; Christensen, Vibeke; Lomholt, Rune; Nielsen, Anni; Qvortrup, Lars; Wistoft, Karen; Clark, Aske;
    Publisher: Syddansk Universitet. Institut for Kulturvidenskaber
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Viola Priesemann; Melanie M. Brinkmann; Sandra Ciesek; Sarah Cuschieri; Thomas Czypionka; Giulia Giordano; Claudia Hanson; Niel Hens; Emil Iftekhar; Peter Klimek; +8 more
    Countries: Denmark, Germany

    No abstract available

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Roel; Andrea Pistillo; Martina Recalde; Anthony G. Sena; Sergio Fernandez-Bertolin; María Aragón; Diana Puente; Waheed Ul Rahman Ahmed; Heba Alghoul; Osaid Alser; +43 more
    Publisher: American Association for Cancer Research
    Countries: United Kingdom, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Denmark, Denmark
    Project: EC | EHDEN (806968), EC | EHDEN (806968)

    Abstract Background: We described the demographics, cancer subtypes, comorbidities, and outcomes of patients with a history of cancer and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Second, we compared patients hospitalized with COVID-19 to patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and patients hospitalized with influenza. Methods: We conducted a cohort study using eight routinely collected health care databases from Spain and the United States, standardized to the Observational Medical Outcome Partnership common data model. Three cohorts of patients with a history of cancer were included: (i) diagnosed with COVID-19, (ii) hospitalized with COVID-19, and (iii) hospitalized with influenza in 2017 to 2018. Patients were followed from index date to 30 days or death. We reported demographics, cancer subtypes, comorbidities, and 30-day outcomes. Results: We included 366,050 and 119,597 patients diagnosed and hospitalized with COVID-19, respectively. Prostate and breast cancers were the most frequent cancers (range: 5%–18% and 1%–14% in the diagnosed cohort, respectively). Hematologic malignancies were also frequent, with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma being among the five most common cancer subtypes in the diagnosed cohort. Overall, patients were aged above 65 years and had multiple comorbidities. Occurrence of death ranged from 2% to 14% and from 6% to 26% in the diagnosed and hospitalized COVID-19 cohorts, respectively. Patients hospitalized with influenza (n = 67,743) had a similar distribution of cancer subtypes, sex, age, and comorbidities but lower occurrence of adverse events. Conclusions: Patients with a history of cancer and COVID-19 had multiple comorbidities and a high occurrence of COVID-19-related events. Hematologic malignancies were frequent. Impact: This study provides epidemiologic characteristics that can inform clinical care and etiologic studies.