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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,304 Research products, page 1 of 131

  • COVID-19
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  • 2013-2022
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  • English
    Authors: 
    Donadelli, Flavia;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    An underlying assumption of modern political states is that they are rational systems that ‘follow the science’ to achieve optimal outcomes for their citizens. Whilst COVID-19 continues to foreground the strengths and weaknesses of different national scientific advice systems, Flavia Donadelli draws on evidence from Brazilian policymaking to argue that evidence informed policymaking is a far more ephemeral process and heavily dependent on institutional and political contexts for it to operate effectively.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rotar, Olga;
    Country: United Kingdom

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, massive open online courses (MOOCs) assisted HEIs in delivering remote teaching in the situations where university could not provide it in a traditional setting. Even before the pandemic there has been an interest in the MOOCs usage in different national contexts, with an expansion of research on the use of MOOCs in non-Western countries (see Altalhi, 2021; Fianu et al. 2018; Hamdan et al. 2018; Roshchina, Roshchin, & Rudakov, 2018). Building on the previous research, this study aims to analyse MOOCs acceptance and usage among academics in Russian higher education by applying the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model (Venkatesh et al., 2003) to answer the following research question: What factors affect academics’ acceptance and usage of MOOCs in Russian Tertiary Education? By doing so, the study intends to explore factors that influence MOOCs usage among academics in Russia and provide insights on how to support the adoption and the usage of MOOCs within higher educational institutions. Furthermore, the study can contribute to the methodological discussion on the research of MOOCs using UTAUT model and test the model in the context of Russian higher education.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bolli, Thomas; id_orcid0000-0002-7317-6862; Caves, Katherine Marie; id_orcid0000-0002-3450-5942; Dändliker, Lena; id_orcid0000-0001-6926-7297; Morlet, Guillaume Maxence Augusti; id_orcid0000-0001-6679-8156; Rageth, Ladina; id_orcid0000-0002-5431-0843; Renold, Ursula; id_orcid0000-0003-4196-0019; Sritharan, Aranya; id_orcid0000-0002-8085-5644;
    Publisher: ETH Zurich, Chair of Education Systems
    Country: Switzerland

    As part of the research project Apprenticeship Pulse, this fact sheet provides an overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on basic vocational education in Switzerland in March 2022 and compares these results with those of earlier surveys, in particular with those of the previous month (February 2022) and a year ago (March 2021).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Karwowski, Ewa;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The global COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated a trend underway for the last decade: the enlistment of private-sector commercial finance for development. This finance can be brought in through (1) regular cross-border flows, (2) blended finance, and (3) impact bonds. This briefing argues that intensified foreign financial inflows are likely to draw African economies further into financialization, which increases financial instability and can undermine the democratic process, jeopardizing just socio-economic development. Specifically, the short-termism of portfolio flows requires costly reserve accumulation; FDI exposes firms to demands for shareholder value generation; and external debt introduces exchange rate risk for domestic borrowers. Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hunger, Sophia; Hutter, Swen;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Fridays for Future, which was set up to campaign against climate change, has had a major impact across Europe. Yet the Covid-19 outbreak has forced the movement to adopt new strategies beyond public demonstrations. Sophia Hunger and Swen Hutter examine how supporters were mobilised in Germany during a recent online climate strike.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Das, Ranjana;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    As the COVID-19 pandemic creates an array of unprecedented pressures on society, and on parents and children, its impacts are likely to be felt intensely in pregnancy and maternity. To mark Maternal Mental Health Awareness Week, Dr Ranjana Das, Reader in Media and Communication at the University of Surrey and LSE alumni, outlines the potential impacts from the rapid move to online support to meet the needs of isolated new mums. Discussing her new book, Early Motherhood in Digital Societies: Ideals, Anxieties and Ties of the Perinatal, she argues in favour of a strategy for maternal digital well-being which distinguishes the specific needs of mothers and offers integrated digital and offline service provision.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Rose, Louise; Xyrichis, Andreas; Metaxa, Victoria; Pattison, Natalie; Graham, Tanya; Ramsay, Pam; Saha, Sian; Meyer, Joel;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Objective: To gain perspectives from family members about barriers and facilitators to virtual visit set up and conduct across intensive care unit settings in the United Kingdom to inform understanding of best practices. Methods: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study recruiting a purposive sample of family members of adult intensive care unit patients experiencing virtual visiting during Jan to May 2021 of the COVID-19 pandemic. We used semi-structured qualitative interviews and a standard Thematic Analysis approach. Results: We recruited 41 family-member participants from 16 hospitals in the United Kingdom. Facilitators to successful virtual visit set-up were preparation of the family, negotiating a preferred time, and easy-to-use technology. Facilitators to successful conduct were intensive care unit team member presence; enabling family involvement in care; inclusivity, accessibility, and flexibility; and having a sense of control. Barriers that created distress or conflict included restrictive virtual visiting practices; raising expectations then failing to meet them; lack of virtual visit pre-planning; and failing to prepare the patient. Barriers to visit conduct were incorrect camera positioning, insufficient technical and staff resources, issues with three-way connectivity, and lack of call closure. Recommendations included emotional self-preparation, increased technology availability, and preparing conversation topics. Conclusion: These data may guide virtual visiting practices during the ongoing pandemic but also to continue virtual visiting outside of pandemic conditions. This will benefit family members suffering from ill health, living at a distance, unable to afford travel, and those with work and care commitments, thereby reducing inequities of access and promoting family-centered care. 2022 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This is the accepted manuscript version of an article which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2022.103264 Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Drury, John; Rogers, M. Brooke; Marteau, Theresa M.; Yardley, Lucy; Reicher, Stephen; Stott, Clifford;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The work of Drury, Reicher, and Stott on this paper was supported by funding from UK Research and Innovation/Economic and Social Research Council (grant reference number ES/V005383/1). This article reviews the behavioural risks and possible mitigations for re-opening large venues for sports and music events when Covid-19 infection rates and hospitalizations begin to decline. We describe the key variables that we suggest will affect public behaviour relevant to the spread of the virus, drawing upon four sources: (1) relevant evidence and recommendations from the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours produced for the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE); (2) research evidence from non-pandemic conditions; (3) research on behaviour during the pandemic; and (4) relevant theory. We first outline some basic risks and a framework for understanding collective behaviour at live events. We then survey some trends in UK public behaviour observed over 2020 and how these might interact with the opening of live events and venues. We present a range of mitigation strategies, based on the framework for collective behaviour and on what is known about non-pharmaceutical (i.e. behavioural) interventions in relation to Covid-19. Publisher PDF Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Mion, Giordano;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Trade recovered quickly after 2008 because the collapse wasn't long enough for firms to dismantle their portfolios, writes Giordano Mion

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hengel, Erin; Milas, Costas;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Erin Hengel and Costas Milas discuss some ways through which economists can improve their quantitative models in order to help policymakers tackle today’s economic challenges, as well as to equip future economists for situations similar to the COVID-19 crisis.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,304 Research products, page 1 of 131
  • English
    Authors: 
    Donadelli, Flavia;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    An underlying assumption of modern political states is that they are rational systems that ‘follow the science’ to achieve optimal outcomes for their citizens. Whilst COVID-19 continues to foreground the strengths and weaknesses of different national scientific advice systems, Flavia Donadelli draws on evidence from Brazilian policymaking to argue that evidence informed policymaking is a far more ephemeral process and heavily dependent on institutional and political contexts for it to operate effectively.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rotar, Olga;
    Country: United Kingdom

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, massive open online courses (MOOCs) assisted HEIs in delivering remote teaching in the situations where university could not provide it in a traditional setting. Even before the pandemic there has been an interest in the MOOCs usage in different national contexts, with an expansion of research on the use of MOOCs in non-Western countries (see Altalhi, 2021; Fianu et al. 2018; Hamdan et al. 2018; Roshchina, Roshchin, & Rudakov, 2018). Building on the previous research, this study aims to analyse MOOCs acceptance and usage among academics in Russian higher education by applying the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model (Venkatesh et al., 2003) to answer the following research question: What factors affect academics’ acceptance and usage of MOOCs in Russian Tertiary Education? By doing so, the study intends to explore factors that influence MOOCs usage among academics in Russia and provide insights on how to support the adoption and the usage of MOOCs within higher educational institutions. Furthermore, the study can contribute to the methodological discussion on the research of MOOCs using UTAUT model and test the model in the context of Russian higher education.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bolli, Thomas; id_orcid0000-0002-7317-6862; Caves, Katherine Marie; id_orcid0000-0002-3450-5942; Dändliker, Lena; id_orcid0000-0001-6926-7297; Morlet, Guillaume Maxence Augusti; id_orcid0000-0001-6679-8156; Rageth, Ladina; id_orcid0000-0002-5431-0843; Renold, Ursula; id_orcid0000-0003-4196-0019; Sritharan, Aranya; id_orcid0000-0002-8085-5644;
    Publisher: ETH Zurich, Chair of Education Systems
    Country: Switzerland

    As part of the research project Apprenticeship Pulse, this fact sheet provides an overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on basic vocational education in Switzerland in March 2022 and compares these results with those of earlier surveys, in particular with those of the previous month (February 2022) and a year ago (March 2021).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Karwowski, Ewa;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The global COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated a trend underway for the last decade: the enlistment of private-sector commercial finance for development. This finance can be brought in through (1) regular cross-border flows, (2) blended finance, and (3) impact bonds. This briefing argues that intensified foreign financial inflows are likely to draw African economies further into financialization, which increases financial instability and can undermine the democratic process, jeopardizing just socio-economic development. Specifically, the short-termism of portfolio flows requires costly reserve accumulation; FDI exposes firms to demands for shareholder value generation; and external debt introduces exchange rate risk for domestic borrowers. Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hunger, Sophia; Hutter, Swen;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Fridays for Future, which was set up to campaign against climate change, has had a major impact across Europe. Yet the Covid-19 outbreak has forced the movement to adopt new strategies beyond public demonstrations. Sophia Hunger and Swen Hutter examine how supporters were mobilised in Germany during a recent online climate strike.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Das, Ranjana;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    As the COVID-19 pandemic creates an array of unprecedented pressures on society, and on parents and children, its impacts are likely to be felt intensely in pregnancy and maternity. To mark Maternal Mental Health Awareness Week, Dr Ranjana Das, Reader in Media and Communication at the University of Surrey and LSE alumni, outlines the potential impacts from the rapid move to online support to meet the needs of isolated new mums. Discussing her new book, Early Motherhood in Digital Societies: Ideals, Anxieties and Ties of the Perinatal, she argues in favour of a strategy for maternal digital well-being which distinguishes the specific needs of mothers and offers integrated digital and offline service provision.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Rose, Louise; Xyrichis, Andreas; Metaxa, Victoria; Pattison, Natalie; Graham, Tanya; Ramsay, Pam; Saha, Sian; Meyer, Joel;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Objective: To gain perspectives from family members about barriers and facilitators to virtual visit set up and conduct across intensive care unit settings in the United Kingdom to inform understanding of best practices. Methods: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study recruiting a purposive sample of family members of adult intensive care unit patients experiencing virtual visiting during Jan to May 2021 of the COVID-19 pandemic. We used semi-structured qualitative interviews and a standard Thematic Analysis approach. Results: We recruited 41 family-member participants from 16 hospitals in the United Kingdom. Facilitators to successful virtual visit set-up were preparation of the family, negotiating a preferred time, and easy-to-use technology. Facilitators to successful conduct were intensive care unit team member presence; enabling family involvement in care; inclusivity, accessibility, and flexibility; and having a sense of control. Barriers that created distress or conflict included restrictive virtual visiting practices; raising expectations then failing to meet them; lack of virtual visit pre-planning; and failing to prepare the patient. Barriers to visit conduct were incorrect camera positioning, insufficient technical and staff resources, issues with three-way connectivity, and lack of call closure. Recommendations included emotional self-preparation, increased technology availability, and preparing conversation topics. Conclusion: These data may guide virtual visiting practices during the ongoing pandemic but also to continue virtual visiting outside of pandemic conditions. This will benefit family members suffering from ill health, living at a distance, unable to afford travel, and those with work and care commitments, thereby reducing inequities of access and promoting family-centered care. 2022 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This is the accepted manuscript version of an article which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2022.103264 Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Drury, John; Rogers, M. Brooke; Marteau, Theresa M.; Yardley, Lucy; Reicher, Stephen; Stott, Clifford;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The work of Drury, Reicher, and Stott on this paper was supported by funding from UK Research and Innovation/Economic and Social Research Council (grant reference number ES/V005383/1). This article reviews the behavioural risks and possible mitigations for re-opening large venues for sports and music events when Covid-19 infection rates and hospitalizations begin to decline. We describe the key variables that we suggest will affect public behaviour relevant to the spread of the virus, drawing upon four sources: (1) relevant evidence and recommendations from the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours produced for the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE); (2) research evidence from non-pandemic conditions; (3) research on behaviour during the pandemic; and (4) relevant theory. We first outline some basic risks and a framework for understanding collective behaviour at live events. We then survey some trends in UK public behaviour observed over 2020 and how these might interact with the opening of live events and venues. We present a range of mitigation strategies, based on the framework for collective behaviour and on what is known about non-pharmaceutical (i.e. behavioural) interventions in relation to Covid-19. Publisher PDF Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Mion, Giordano;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Trade recovered quickly after 2008 because the collapse wasn't long enough for firms to dismantle their portfolios, writes Giordano Mion

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hengel, Erin; Milas, Costas;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Erin Hengel and Costas Milas discuss some ways through which economists can improve their quantitative models in order to help policymakers tackle today’s economic challenges, as well as to equip future economists for situations similar to the COVID-19 crisis.