Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • COVID-19
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
  • FR
  • English
  • Mémoires en Sciences de l'Information et de la Communication
  • Hal-Diderot
  • Hyper Article en Ligne

Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    KEUCHEYAN, Razmig;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    The COVID-19 pandemic has brought a change of priorities, as states buy up masks and ventilators regardless of the cost. Basing economic decisions on human need, not our ability to pay, imposes a principle of equality — allowing us collectively to decide what kinds of production we really need.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Germes, Mélina;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    This text is a report about the "Sex Drugs and the City" Event. // Only the half of the “Sex, Drugs and the City” event could take place. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we had to cancel the participative discussion planned for the broader public in the evening. The academic afternoon took place on October 22, 2020, in Bordeaux under the title “Alcohol and drugs in affective or sexual relationships: transactions, consent, grey zones?” A video recording of the event is available in French via the Narcotic City webpage. “Alcohol and Drugs in Affective or Sexual Relationships: Transactions, Consent, Grey Zones?”

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Blanquart, Corinne; Chen, Chia-Lin; de URENA, José Maria; Delaplace, Marie; Gastineau, Pascal; Koning, Martin; LIEDTKE, Gernot; Pagliara, Francesca; YOSHINO, Naoyuki;
    Publisher: T20 Saudia
    Country: France

    _; This proposal adopts a holistic approach to strategic transport investment by discussing the wider economic impacts (WEIs) analysis method in terms of several dominant and emerging methods. The WEIs analysis goes beyond the effects captured in a standard cost-benefit analysis (CBA). A CBA addresses the market for transport services and infrastructure access but neglects the wider impacts on other markets. These wider impacts usually relate to agglomeration, market power, and the behavioral adaptions of firms and households. The high uncertainty in land use changes indicates that WEIs tend to occur in different forms on multiple spatial scales, varying by place and time. Additionally, some activities, such as education, have no direct market value, but may indirectly contribute to the overall economic output and human capital development in cities and regions. Given that the conventional elasticity methods are not goal oriented, it is important to ensure that the WEIs analysis accounts for the stakeholder-specific costs and benefits. Assuming that it is possible to consider all WEIs through theoretical models, major efforts should focus on establishing and maintaining appropriate methodologies and tools. The social and environmental data needed to address biodiversity issues should also be improved and promoted. Complementary to the WEIs, understanding how the behavior of agents changes in response to the new transport options will help clarify the long-term implications of transportation. This will suggest new strategies (territorial appropriation), approaches/ techniques to feasibility, and ?place-based? interrelations, that is, specific interrelations in places. This last aspect is especially important in the current context of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has affected and will likely change transportation behaviors and transport demand in the dynamic future.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brives, Charlotte;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; By "We are at war." This was Emmanuel Macron's chosen refrain when he addressed the French nation about the current COVID-19 pandemic. He is certainly not the first to present human/pathogenic microbe relations in this way. Indeed, the history of immunology and epidemiology is littered with the vocabulary of war. But this presidential rhetoric reveals a certain communication strategy based on national unity, a hackneyed but nevertheless effective argument that is perfectly in keeping with a neoliberal ideology, a context in which the life of society is a constant struggle. Who is at war, and against what? For there to be a war, there needs to be an enemy. But while viruses can maintain close relations with humans, and under certain circumstances may even put their lives in danger, the definition of their intentions only commits those who claim to give it. It is important that the perspective of these humans never be reduced to a universal 'us', which would grant them permission to speak on behalf of others, whether that be entire countries, or the whole of humanity.