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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,378 Research products, page 1 of 138

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  • English
    Authors: 
    Dave, Rajiv V; Kim, Baek; Courtney, Alona; O'Connell, Rachel; Rattay, Tim; Taxiarchi, Vicky P; Kirkham, Jamie J; Camacho, Elizabeth M; Fairbrother, Patricia; Sharma, Nisha; +13 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: United Kingdom

    A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-021-01378-x

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Terrier, Lohyd; Audrin, Bertrand;
    Country: Switzerland

    The purpose of this research is to understand how organizational identification and fear of Covid-19 influence individuals’ attitudes, trust, and intention to carpool. For this study, 299 participants completed an online questionnaire in which we assessed their organizational identification, fear of Covid-19, perceived risks, attitude, trust, and intention to carpool. Results show that the relationship between individuals and their organization is an effective lever to promote carpooling. Our results confirm that individuals’ trust level and attitude strongly determine carpooling intention. The results highlight a negative relationship between perceived risks and attitude, as well as trust; Covid-19 is also identified as an antecedent to perceived risks. Organizations implementing carpooling solutions should focus on developing organizational identification and address fears associated with Covid-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Levy, Orly;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botta, Alberto; Yajima, Giuliano; Porcile, Gabriel;
    Publisher: Post-Keynesian Economic Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    The outbreak of Covid-19 brought back to the forefront the crucial importance of structural change and productive development for economic resilience to economic shocks. Several recent contributions have already stressed the perverse relation that may exist between productive backwardness and the intensity of the Covid-19 socio-economic crisis. In this paper, we analyze the factors that may have hindered productive development for over four decades before the pandemic. We investigate the role of (non-FDI) net capital inflows as a potential source of premature de-industrialization. We consider a sample of 36 developed and developing countries from 1980 to 2017, with major emphasis on the case of emerging and developing (EDE) economies in the context of increasing financial integration. We show that periods of abundant capital inflows may have caused the significant contraction of manufacturing share to employment and GDP, as well as the decrease of the economic complexity index. We also show that phenomena of “perverse” structural change are significantly more relevant in EDE countries than advanced ones. Based on such evidence, we conclude with some policy suggestions highlighting capital controls and external macroprudential measures taming international capital mobility as useful policy tools for promoting long-run productive development on top of strengthening (short-term) financial and macroeconomic stability.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Bhalotia, Shania; Dhingra, Swati; Kondirolli, Fjola;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has decimated livelihoods in urban India and created a new underclass of workers who are being pushed into poverty. Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli (LSE) say a national work guarantee is needed to prevent mass long-term unemployment and poverty.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ullah, Akbar; Ajala, Olubunmi Agift;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Anson, Ian; Kane, John;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Last week President Trump signed an unprecedented $2 trillion stimulus bill aimed at protecting workers and businesses threatened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Perhaps equally surprising was the relative lack of opposition from Republicans, who at other times are opposed to increased government spending and growing deficits. Drawing on their work on how party-supporters feel about budget deficits and how the media reports on them, Ian G. Anson and John V. Kane write that these supporters are less concerned about deficits when a president from their own party holds the White House. The role of conservative media, they comment, means that this effect is especially stark for a Republican president like Donald Trump.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Gift, Thomas;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    This past weekend, on the eve of Independence Day celebrations, President Trump took a divisive tone by attacking his opponents on the left. In this Q&A, Thomas Gift writes that Trump’s poor polling against his Democratic presidential challenger, former Vice President Joe Biden, and the ongoing criticisms of his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, mean that he is likely to continue to hit out at opponents to galvanize his political base ahead of the election.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Forsberg, Lisa; Black, Isra; Douglas, Thomas; Pugh, Jonathan;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    D’Souza, Jonathan; Prasanna, Felix; Valayannopoulos-Akrivou, Luna-Nefeli; Sherman, Peter; Penn, Elise; Song, Shaojie; Archibald, Alexander T; McElroy, Michael B;
    Publisher: IOP Publishing
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funder: Cambridge STEAM Initiative Funder: Centre for Environmental Data Analysis, Science and Technology Facilities Council Funder: Harvard Global Institute; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100016486 Abstract Fossil fuel and aerosol emissions have played important roles on climate over the Indian subcontinent over the last century. As the world transitions toward decarbonization in the next few decades, emissions pathways could have major impacts on India’s climate and people. Pathways for future emissions are highly uncertain, particularly at present as countries recover from COVID-19. This paper explores a multimodel ensemble of Earth system models leveraging potential global emissions pathways following COVID-19 and the consequences for India’s summertime (June–July–August–September) climate in the near- and long-term. We investigate specifically scenarios which envisage a fossil-based recovery, a strong renewable-based recovery and a moderate scenario in between the two. We find that near-term climate changes are dominated by natural climate variability, and thus likely independent of the emissions pathway. By 2050, pathway-induced spatial patterns in the seasonally-aggregated precipitation become clearer with a slight drying in the fossil-based scenario and wetting in the strong renewable scenario. Additionally, extreme temperature and precipitation events in India are expected to increase in magnitude and frequency regardless of the emissions scenario, though the spatial patterns of these changes as well as the extent of the change are pathway dependent. This study provides an important discussion on the impacts of emissions recover pathways following COVID-19 on India, a nation which is likely to be particularly susceptible to climate change over the coming decades.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,378 Research products, page 1 of 138
  • English
    Authors: 
    Dave, Rajiv V; Kim, Baek; Courtney, Alona; O'Connell, Rachel; Rattay, Tim; Taxiarchi, Vicky P; Kirkham, Jamie J; Camacho, Elizabeth M; Fairbrother, Patricia; Sharma, Nisha; +13 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: United Kingdom

    A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-021-01378-x

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Terrier, Lohyd; Audrin, Bertrand;
    Country: Switzerland

    The purpose of this research is to understand how organizational identification and fear of Covid-19 influence individuals’ attitudes, trust, and intention to carpool. For this study, 299 participants completed an online questionnaire in which we assessed their organizational identification, fear of Covid-19, perceived risks, attitude, trust, and intention to carpool. Results show that the relationship between individuals and their organization is an effective lever to promote carpooling. Our results confirm that individuals’ trust level and attitude strongly determine carpooling intention. The results highlight a negative relationship between perceived risks and attitude, as well as trust; Covid-19 is also identified as an antecedent to perceived risks. Organizations implementing carpooling solutions should focus on developing organizational identification and address fears associated with Covid-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Levy, Orly;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botta, Alberto; Yajima, Giuliano; Porcile, Gabriel;
    Publisher: Post-Keynesian Economic Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    The outbreak of Covid-19 brought back to the forefront the crucial importance of structural change and productive development for economic resilience to economic shocks. Several recent contributions have already stressed the perverse relation that may exist between productive backwardness and the intensity of the Covid-19 socio-economic crisis. In this paper, we analyze the factors that may have hindered productive development for over four decades before the pandemic. We investigate the role of (non-FDI) net capital inflows as a potential source of premature de-industrialization. We consider a sample of 36 developed and developing countries from 1980 to 2017, with major emphasis on the case of emerging and developing (EDE) economies in the context of increasing financial integration. We show that periods of abundant capital inflows may have caused the significant contraction of manufacturing share to employment and GDP, as well as the decrease of the economic complexity index. We also show that phenomena of “perverse” structural change are significantly more relevant in EDE countries than advanced ones. Based on such evidence, we conclude with some policy suggestions highlighting capital controls and external macroprudential measures taming international capital mobility as useful policy tools for promoting long-run productive development on top of strengthening (short-term) financial and macroeconomic stability.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Bhalotia, Shania; Dhingra, Swati; Kondirolli, Fjola;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has decimated livelihoods in urban India and created a new underclass of workers who are being pushed into poverty. Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli (LSE) say a national work guarantee is needed to prevent mass long-term unemployment and poverty.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ullah, Akbar; Ajala, Olubunmi Agift;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Anson, Ian; Kane, John;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Last week President Trump signed an unprecedented $2 trillion stimulus bill aimed at protecting workers and businesses threatened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Perhaps equally surprising was the relative lack of opposition from Republicans, who at other times are opposed to increased government spending and growing deficits. Drawing on their work on how party-supporters feel about budget deficits and how the media reports on them, Ian G. Anson and John V. Kane write that these supporters are less concerned about deficits when a president from their own party holds the White House. The role of conservative media, they comment, means that this effect is especially stark for a Republican president like Donald Trump.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Gift, Thomas;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    This past weekend, on the eve of Independence Day celebrations, President Trump took a divisive tone by attacking his opponents on the left. In this Q&A, Thomas Gift writes that Trump’s poor polling against his Democratic presidential challenger, former Vice President Joe Biden, and the ongoing criticisms of his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, mean that he is likely to continue to hit out at opponents to galvanize his political base ahead of the election.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Forsberg, Lisa; Black, Isra; Douglas, Thomas; Pugh, Jonathan;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    D’Souza, Jonathan; Prasanna, Felix; Valayannopoulos-Akrivou, Luna-Nefeli; Sherman, Peter; Penn, Elise; Song, Shaojie; Archibald, Alexander T; McElroy, Michael B;
    Publisher: IOP Publishing
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funder: Cambridge STEAM Initiative Funder: Centre for Environmental Data Analysis, Science and Technology Facilities Council Funder: Harvard Global Institute; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100016486 Abstract Fossil fuel and aerosol emissions have played important roles on climate over the Indian subcontinent over the last century. As the world transitions toward decarbonization in the next few decades, emissions pathways could have major impacts on India’s climate and people. Pathways for future emissions are highly uncertain, particularly at present as countries recover from COVID-19. This paper explores a multimodel ensemble of Earth system models leveraging potential global emissions pathways following COVID-19 and the consequences for India’s summertime (June–July–August–September) climate in the near- and long-term. We investigate specifically scenarios which envisage a fossil-based recovery, a strong renewable-based recovery and a moderate scenario in between the two. We find that near-term climate changes are dominated by natural climate variability, and thus likely independent of the emissions pathway. By 2050, pathway-induced spatial patterns in the seasonally-aggregated precipitation become clearer with a slight drying in the fossil-based scenario and wetting in the strong renewable scenario. Additionally, extreme temperature and precipitation events in India are expected to increase in magnitude and frequency regardless of the emissions scenario, though the spatial patterns of these changes as well as the extent of the change are pathway dependent. This study provides an important discussion on the impacts of emissions recover pathways following COVID-19 on India, a nation which is likely to be particularly susceptible to climate change over the coming decades.