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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,287 Research products, page 1 of 129

  • COVID-19
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  • English
    Authors: 
    Donadelli, Flavia;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    An underlying assumption of modern political states is that they are rational systems that ‘follow the science’ to achieve optimal outcomes for their citizens. Whilst COVID-19 continues to foreground the strengths and weaknesses of different national scientific advice systems, Flavia Donadelli draws on evidence from Brazilian policymaking to argue that evidence informed policymaking is a far more ephemeral process and heavily dependent on institutional and political contexts for it to operate effectively.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Oryem, Robin;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has been portrayed internationally as a disease more dangerous than Ebola. In Uganda this has created fear among various communities, specifically in the north of the country, where the memory of Ebola remains present. A consequence of the outbreak is reported xenophobia and rumours the epidemic is spread by the rich. Robin Oryem reports from experience on the ground and the role of behavioural change in preventing the disease’s spread.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Dimitrakopoulos, Dionyssis G.; Lalis, Georgette;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Dionyssis G Dimitrakopoulos and Georgette Lalis analyse the EU's actions so far in the Covid-19 outbreak. They argue that despite a slow and initially haphazard approach, the response has ultimately been substantial. Public health care systems, alongside state bureaucracies and public finances, are being tested to their limits by the Covid-19 pandemic. The same can be said – albeit in a different way – about the European Union. Indeed, since the problem at hand knows no borders, appealing to an organisation that operates at the ‘supranational’ level is not an unreasonable reaction to a crisis such as this and an existential threat like this pandemic. So, how has the EU fared thus far in this process?

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Furmonaviciene, Ruta; Dubakiene, Ruta; Šauliene, Ingrida;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This event has been organised in collaboration with Prof R Dubakiene from Vilnius University and Prof I Šauliene from Šauliai Academy of Vilnius University DMUGlobal Allergy Friday: Sessions on International Allergy Research for DMU ABMS BIOM5015 Module Students Presentations and Activities Prepared by Dr R Furmonaviciene in Collaboration with Prof R Dubakiene and Prof I Sauliene from Vilnius University as well as with DMUGlobal and DMULocal Teams Session Activities also included Production of Allergy Information Cards for Local Community as part of ‘Sharing knowledge for re-building communities after the COVID-19 pandemic’ project

  • English
    Authors: 
    Anson, Ian; Kane, John;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Last week President Trump signed an unprecedented $2 trillion stimulus bill aimed at protecting workers and businesses threatened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Perhaps equally surprising was the relative lack of opposition from Republicans, who at other times are opposed to increased government spending and growing deficits. Drawing on their work on how party-supporters feel about budget deficits and how the media reports on them, Ian G. Anson and John V. Kane write that these supporters are less concerned about deficits when a president from their own party holds the White House. The role of conservative media, they comment, means that this effect is especially stark for a Republican president like Donald Trump.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Clugston, Naomi; Spearing, Michelle;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    We urgently need to understand the specific risks of COVID-19 for conflict-affected women and girls, with the most vulnerable countries to COVID-19 being conflict zones and fragile states. Michelle Spearing and Naomi Clugston of Social Development Direct tell us of the importance of grassroots women’s networks in mobilising a response and call on governments, donors and INGO’s to fund these networks, protect and empower women and prioritise gender-based violence in order to maintain and adapt current programmes.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Metastasio, Antonio; Prevete, Elisabeth; Singh, Darshan; Grundmann, Oliver; Prozialeck, Walter C.; Veltri, Charles; Bersani, Giuseppe; Corazza, Ornella;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Among the symptoms of COVID-19 fever, general malaise, pain and aches, myalgia, fatigue, and headache can affect the quality of life of patients, even after the end of the acute phase of the infection and can be long lasting. The current treatment of these symptoms, also because COVID-19 patients have been asked not to use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in particular ibuprofen are often unsatisfactory. Among the above mentioned symptoms malaise and fatigue seem the most difficult to treat. In this case report we describe the use of kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) by a patient with confirmed COVID-19 infection. What we observed was a fast and sustained relieve of the above mentioned symptoms. © 2020 Metastasio, Prevete, Singh, Grundmann, Prozialeck, Veltri, Bersani and Corazza. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Final Published version Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    Atti, A; Ferrari, M; Castillo-Olivares, J; Monk, EJM; Gopal, R; Patel, M; Hoschler, K; Cole, MJ; Semper, A; Hewson, J; +15 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: United Kingdom

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the serological profile of first two SARS-CoV-2 confirmed reinfections in the national healthcare worker cohort study SARS-CoV-2 Immunity and Reinfection Evaluation (SIREN) and potentially identify correlates of protection against reinfection. METHODS: In addition to routine testing within the SIREN study, viral culture, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were performed. Total antibody testing (Anti-SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid and Anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike) were complemented by receptor binding domain indirect ELISA and neutralising antibody assays. RESULTS: The first two SARS-CoV-2 confirmed reinfections had mild symptomatic illness episodes from which infectious virus was recovered at the time of reinfection. The recovered viruses and their sequences were closely related to viruses circulating locally during the time of reinfection and serology was consistent with reinfection. Prior to reinfection, both cases had ELISA and immunoblot detectable anti-N antibodies, but lacked live virus neutralising antibody. Within days following reinfection, neutralising antibodies became detectable and anti-N and anti-S binding antibodies were boosted. CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesise that titres of neutralising antibody can be used as a correlate of protection against reinfection. Further analysis using a case-control design is essential in order to confirm this hypothesis.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Drury, John; Rogers, M. Brooke; Marteau, Theresa M.; Yardley, Lucy; Reicher, Stephen; Stott, Clifford;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The work of Drury, Reicher, and Stott on this paper was supported by funding from UK Research and Innovation/Economic and Social Research Council (grant reference number ES/V005383/1). This article reviews the behavioural risks and possible mitigations for re-opening large venues for sports and music events when Covid-19 infection rates and hospitalizations begin to decline. We describe the key variables that we suggest will affect public behaviour relevant to the spread of the virus, drawing upon four sources: (1) relevant evidence and recommendations from the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours produced for the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE); (2) research evidence from non-pandemic conditions; (3) research on behaviour during the pandemic; and (4) relevant theory. We first outline some basic risks and a framework for understanding collective behaviour at live events. We then survey some trends in UK public behaviour observed over 2020 and how these might interact with the opening of live events and venues. We present a range of mitigation strategies, based on the framework for collective behaviour and on what is known about non-pharmaceutical (i.e. behavioural) interventions in relation to Covid-19. Publisher PDF Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    D'Souza, J; Prasanna, F; Valayannopoulos-Akrivou, LN; Sherman, P; Penn, E; Song, S; Archibald, AT; McElroy, MB;
    Publisher: IOP Publishing
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funder: Cambridge STEAM Initiative Funder: Centre for Environmental Data Analysis, Science and Technology Facilities Council Funder: Harvard Global Institute; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100016486 Abstract Fossil fuel and aerosol emissions have played important roles on climate over the Indian subcontinent over the last century. As the world transitions toward decarbonization in the next few decades, emissions pathways could have major impacts on India’s climate and people. Pathways for future emissions are highly uncertain, particularly at present as countries recover from COVID-19. This paper explores a multimodel ensemble of Earth system models leveraging potential global emissions pathways following COVID-19 and the consequences for India’s summertime (June–July–August–September) climate in the near- and long-term. We investigate specifically scenarios which envisage a fossil-based recovery, a strong renewable-based recovery and a moderate scenario in between the two. We find that near-term climate changes are dominated by natural climate variability, and thus likely independent of the emissions pathway. By 2050, pathway-induced spatial patterns in the seasonally-aggregated precipitation become clearer with a slight drying in the fossil-based scenario and wetting in the strong renewable scenario. Additionally, extreme temperature and precipitation events in India are expected to increase in magnitude and frequency regardless of the emissions scenario, though the spatial patterns of these changes as well as the extent of the change are pathway dependent. This study provides an important discussion on the impacts of emissions recover pathways following COVID-19 on India, a nation which is likely to be particularly susceptible to climate change over the coming decades.