Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
6 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • Restricted
  • English
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Christoph Raetzsch; Teke Ngomba; Cecilia Arregui Olivera; Unni From; Henrik Bødker;

    In a recent commentary, Seth Lewis calls for a “rethinking” of the “objects and objectives” of journalism studies in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Whilst not underestimating the significant effects of this ongoing global health crisis, the authors of this commentary do not share the sense of urgency for revising the field on such a broad scale. We wish to raise three key points that criticize and supplement Lewis’ reflections in light of existing debates in and beyond journalism studies and digital journalism studies in particular. These concern (1) the assumption that news journalism is relevant independent of its orientation towards audiences, an assumption that is problematized especially in digital journalism studies, (2) the overlooked importance of journalism education in a global perspective to create impact of research, and (3) the problematic assumption of a common identity of journalism studies scholars across the field as such. In this reply, the authors wish to make a pledge towards a greater importance of diversity in relation to global journalism studies and the importance of the field of digital journalism studies to realize such an ambition.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Martina Bosone; Francesca Nocca; Luigi Fusco Girard;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy

    In a word that is increasingly facing issues related to climate change, environmental degradation, economic crisis and social inequalities, rethinking the urban development models is becoming an “imperative”. Furthermore, the COVID-19 is accelerating this necessity. In fact, the health emergency has affected almost all sectors, determining radical change in economic and social systems. Tourism and culture are among those most affected and therefore they require strategies to support their recovery and to strengthen their resilience for the future. The closure of cultural venues has highlighted the importance of finding alternative ways to join cultural heritage and to allow it continuing to develop its productive potential. In this context, the importance of the opportunities offered by digital technologies for conservation, valorization and enjoyment of cultural heritage has emerged. This study proposes the circular city as a new urban development model to achieve a more sustainable future, focusing in particular on cultural heritage as an entry point to implement this model. Furthermore, the role of technology is investigated as “enabler” of inclusive and sustainable culture-based development processes for supporting the implementation of the circular city model.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Olga Teodora Bardales Mendoza; Renán Meza Díaz; María Carbajal;
    Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert
    Country: Peru

    This work explores the extreme violence against women before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in Peru, considering different restriction periods. This is relevant in view of increased violence against women. The objective of this work was to identify the feminicide and attempted feminicide during different quarantine periods due to the COVID-19 health emergency in Peru, and to determine the variables related to these. Data of administrative records of the cases of feminicide and attempted feminicide were analyzed. Our results show that cases of attempted feminicide occurred in higher proportions during the prequarantine period compared to the other periods. In the case of feminicide, its highest percentage occurred during quarantine with a relationship relatively intense when the victim has suffered physical and psychological violence. Also, we find that attempted feminicide was 4.3 times more likely to happen to urban resident victims, 7.9 times more likely when women suffered physical violence, and 7.4 times when they were victims of psychological violence. During quarantine, attempted feminicide was more likely when a victim lives in an urban area (3.5 times), when the victim suffered physical and psychological violence (21.7 and 5.2 times, respectively), and 3.1 times more likely when the attempted feminicide occurred inside the household. The cases of attempted feminicide that occurred during restrictive measures are 5.0 times more likely when a victim belongs to urban areas, 23.4 times more likely when the woman suffered physical violence, and 4.3 times more likely when she was a victim of psychological violence.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Peter-Ben Smit; Kirsten van der Ham; Marjolein Hekman; Mirella Klomp; Thijs Tromp;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Rogers, James;
    Country: Denmark

    Over the covid-19 lockdown period, Dr James Rogers worked with history teachers and academics to keep the learning going in lockdown. He now has a fantastic range of videos and podcasts available. All content is free to access and is explicitly designed to help teachers and students undertake A-Level and GCSE history revision.Podcast - Slavery and Emancipation in the United States, with Dr Cathrine Armstrong.Podcast - The History of Terrorism - The IRA, with Professor Caroline Kennedy-Pipe.Video - The Rise of Hitler - Hitler, Power, and War, with Ms Laurie Matthews.Video - The Home Front in WW2 - The Butterfly Bombing of Grimsby, with Dr James Rogers.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Enevoldsen, Kenneth; Danielsen, Andreas Aalkjær; Rohde, Christopher; Jefsen, Oskar Hougaard; Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Østergaard, Søren Dinesen;
    Publisher: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 pandemic has been shown to have a major negative impact on global mental health and patients with mental illness may be particularly vulnerable. We show that developments in COVID-19 pandemic-related psychopathology among patients with mental illness can be meaningfully monitored using machine learning methods. The COVID-19 pandemic-related psychopathology was found to covary with the pandemic pressure. This correlation was, however, less pronounced during the second wave compared to the first wave of the pandemic - possibly due to habituation.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
6 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Christoph Raetzsch; Teke Ngomba; Cecilia Arregui Olivera; Unni From; Henrik Bødker;

    In a recent commentary, Seth Lewis calls for a “rethinking” of the “objects and objectives” of journalism studies in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Whilst not underestimating the significant effects of this ongoing global health crisis, the authors of this commentary do not share the sense of urgency for revising the field on such a broad scale. We wish to raise three key points that criticize and supplement Lewis’ reflections in light of existing debates in and beyond journalism studies and digital journalism studies in particular. These concern (1) the assumption that news journalism is relevant independent of its orientation towards audiences, an assumption that is problematized especially in digital journalism studies, (2) the overlooked importance of journalism education in a global perspective to create impact of research, and (3) the problematic assumption of a common identity of journalism studies scholars across the field as such. In this reply, the authors wish to make a pledge towards a greater importance of diversity in relation to global journalism studies and the importance of the field of digital journalism studies to realize such an ambition.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Martina Bosone; Francesca Nocca; Luigi Fusco Girard;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy

    In a word that is increasingly facing issues related to climate change, environmental degradation, economic crisis and social inequalities, rethinking the urban development models is becoming an “imperative”. Furthermore, the COVID-19 is accelerating this necessity. In fact, the health emergency has affected almost all sectors, determining radical change in economic and social systems. Tourism and culture are among those most affected and therefore they require strategies to support their recovery and to strengthen their resilience for the future. The closure of cultural venues has highlighted the importance of finding alternative ways to join cultural heritage and to allow it continuing to develop its productive potential. In this context, the importance of the opportunities offered by digital technologies for conservation, valorization and enjoyment of cultural heritage has emerged. This study proposes the circular city as a new urban development model to achieve a more sustainable future, focusing in particular on cultural heritage as an entry point to implement this model. Furthermore, the role of technology is investigated as “enabler” of inclusive and sustainable culture-based development processes for supporting the implementation of the circular city model.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Olga Teodora Bardales Mendoza; Renán Meza Díaz; María Carbajal;
    Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert
    Country: Peru

    This work explores the extreme violence against women before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in Peru, considering different restriction periods. This is relevant in view of increased violence against women. The objective of this work was to identify the feminicide and attempted feminicide during different quarantine periods due to the COVID-19 health emergency in Peru, and to determine the variables related to these. Data of administrative records of the cases of feminicide and attempted feminicide were analyzed. Our results show that cases of attempted feminicide occurred in higher proportions during the prequarantine period compared to the other periods. In the case of feminicide, its highest percentage occurred during quarantine with a relationship relatively intense when the victim has suffered physical and psychological violence. Also, we find that attempted feminicide was 4.3 times more likely to happen to urban resident victims, 7.9 times more likely when women suffered physical violence, and 7.4 times when they were victims of psychological violence. During quarantine, attempted feminicide was more likely when a victim lives in an urban area (3.5 times), when the victim suffered physical and psychological violence (21.7 and 5.2 times, respectively), and 3.1 times more likely when the attempted feminicide occurred inside the household. The cases of attempted feminicide that occurred during restrictive measures are 5.0 times more likely when a victim belongs to urban areas, 23.4 times more likely when the woman suffered physical violence, and 4.3 times more likely when she was a victim of psychological violence.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Peter-Ben Smit; Kirsten van der Ham; Marjolein Hekman; Mirella Klomp; Thijs Tromp;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Rogers, James;
    Country: Denmark

    Over the covid-19 lockdown period, Dr James Rogers worked with history teachers and academics to keep the learning going in lockdown. He now has a fantastic range of videos and podcasts available. All content is free to access and is explicitly designed to help teachers and students undertake A-Level and GCSE history revision.Podcast - Slavery and Emancipation in the United States, with Dr Cathrine Armstrong.Podcast - The History of Terrorism - The IRA, with Professor Caroline Kennedy-Pipe.Video - The Rise of Hitler - Hitler, Power, and War, with Ms Laurie Matthews.Video - The Home Front in WW2 - The Butterfly Bombing of Grimsby, with Dr James Rogers.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Enevoldsen, Kenneth; Danielsen, Andreas Aalkjær; Rohde, Christopher; Jefsen, Oskar Hougaard; Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Østergaard, Søren Dinesen;
    Publisher: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 pandemic has been shown to have a major negative impact on global mental health and patients with mental illness may be particularly vulnerable. We show that developments in COVID-19 pandemic-related psychopathology among patients with mental illness can be meaningfully monitored using machine learning methods. The COVID-19 pandemic-related psychopathology was found to covary with the pandemic pressure. This correlation was, however, less pronounced during the second wave compared to the first wave of the pandemic - possibly due to habituation.