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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
16 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • COVID-19
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  • 2018-2022
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  • COVID-19
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  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Lars Bo Kaspersen; Liv Egholm;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications

    We are living in a world which is severely crisis-ridden and faces some major challenges. The fact that we are currently facing a genuine global pandemic (COVID-19) brings about even more uncertainty. The social and political institutions, which emerged and consolidated during the 20th century, and which created stability, have become fragile. The young generation born in the 1990s and onwards have experienced 9/11 and the ‘war against terrorism’, the financial crisis of 2008, changes to climate, environmental degradation, and most recently the COVID-19 pandemic. The generation born between 1960 and 1990 have had the same experiences along with severe economic crises in the 1970s and 1980s and the Cold War. Some of these challenges are in different ways intertwined with capitalism and its crises, while others are linked to the rapid development of new technologies, in particular innovations within communication and information technologies. This introduction lists the most important grand challenges facing the world as they have emerged more recently. The five articles following this introduction address some of these challenges, with particular attention to the problems of capitalism and democracy and the relation between these two areas. Most authors agree that climate change and the destruction of the environment are the biggest and most pertinent problems to address, but it is their stance that we can only meet these challenges if democracy is functioning well. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Thesis Eleven is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Olav Hammer; Karen Swartz;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Denmark

    The years 2020 and 2021 will be remembered as a time profoundly marked by the COVID-19 pandemic. We have all had to come to grips with the effects of this invisible global menace, which has left any number of visible traces behind in its wake, not only individually but also as members of the communities, whatever contours and foundations they may have, to which we belong. Religious communities in particular have attempted to adapt to, or in some cases resist, the strictures imposed by various forms of lockdown which have lasted for varying stretches of time, have created rituals intended to address the needs and concerns of their members, and have formulated explanations for the emergence of the pandemic in terms of their doctrinal systems. The first five articles in this issue of Approaching Religion explore such community-based ways of interpreting and dealing with the impact of the COVID-19 crisis.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cornelia Baciu;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: Denmark

    This article explores the discourses and strategies of security international organisations (IOs) during the COVID-19 pandemic, applying NATO as a case study. To build the argument, the article analyses speeches and public interventions by the SG and DSG coded in NVivo. First, the results of the empirical analysis suggest that during the crisis NATO discourse focussed on its ability to perform core functions, on constructing identity, generating “positive” legitimacy, or on increasing the relevance of military capital. Second, the findings show that the main elements of the organisation’s COVID-19 crisis management strategy were: proactiveness, continuous review and planning ahead, stepping-up activities and efficiency, lessons learned, adaptability, solidarity and civil-military cooperation. Third, a logic of IO exceptionalism and ‘emergency problematique’, underpinned by mission creep, could not be conclusively confirmed based on the analysed sample. The article adds a theoretical distinction to the literature on global governance in times of emergency. It demonstrates that security IOs might not always seek explicit authority leaps through lowering checks and balances (horizonal) or reducing the legal protection of subjects (vertical), due to risks of sanctioning.Keywords

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adam Bencard;
    Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Inc.
    Country: Denmark

    Amongst the many spiraling effects of the current COVID-19 pandemic has been an intense interest in finding historical frames of reference for our current predicament. Past epidemics, from the Plague to the Spanish Flu, have been brought back to the public consciousness, both to search for instructive patterns and lessons, and perhaps also as a way to cope with uncertainties and anxieties; a reminder that we have been here before, facing down an unknown disease. This paper unfolds two examples of such narratives of epidemic disease before the advent of microbiology, both in Copenhagen, Denmark: The plague in 1711 and cholera in 1853. It does so in order to query how past societies inquired into the origins epidemic disease and how they used their medical and other knowledge tools to construct theories of the disease and its patterns. Ultimately, these two histories serve as reminders that any history of epidemic disease is also a history of societies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Omer Onur Cakir; Fabio Castiglione; Z. Tandogdu; Justin W. Collins; Hussain M. Alnajjar; Clare Akers; Maarten Albersen; Constantine Alifrangis; B. Ayres; Oscar R. Brouwer; +16 more
    Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC
    Country: Belgium

    Objectives To develop an international consensus on managing penile cancer patients during the COVID-19 acute waves. A major concern for patients with penile cancer during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is how the enforced safety measures will affect their disease management. Delays in diagnosis and treatment initiation may have an impact on the extent of the primary lesion as well as the cancer-specific survival because of the development and progression of inguinal lymph node metastases. Materials and methods A review of the COVID-19 literature was conducted in conjunction with analysis of current international guidelines on the management of penile cancer. Results were presented to an international panel of experts on penile cancer and infection control by a virtual accelerated Delphi process using 4 survey rounds. Consensus opinion was defined as an agreement of ≥80%, which was used to reconfigure management pathways for penile cancer. Results Limited evidence is available for delaying penile cancer management. The consensus rate of agreement was 100% that penile cancer pathways should be reconfigured, and measures should be developed to prevent perioperative nosocomial transmission of COVID-19. The panel also reached a consensus on several statements aimed at reconfiguring the management of penile cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions The international consensus panel proposed a framework for the diagnostic and invasive therapeutic procedures for penile cancer within a low-risk environment for COVID-19. Highlights • In response to the dramatic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health care pathways and delivery, including delays in management of aggressive cancers, an international expert panel was convened to address the management pathways for patients with penile cancer. • This study reports the statements developed by the panel to reconfigure the management pathways for penile cancer patients during the COVID-19 acute waves. • The adaptation of the EAU and NCCN penile cancer guidelines for use in the setting of COVID-19 acute waves was guided mainly by 2 necessities: To minimize the numbers of hospital visits and hospitalization and to prevent COVID-19-related complications attributed to cancer treatment • A consensus was reached regarding multiple items related to the diagnosis and management of penile cancer throughout the COVID-19 acute waves. • Non-urgent procedures should be postponed and non-invasive procedures should be encouraged to delay or avoid the need for procedures that require general anesthesia because of the morbidity associated with perioperative severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Boyd, Kenneth;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Denmark

    Even before it had been developed there had already been skepticism among the general public concerning a vaccine for COVID-19. What are the factors that drive this skepticism? While much has been said about how political differences are at play, in this article I draw attention to two additional factors that have not received as much attention: witnessing the fallibility of the scientific process play out in real time, and a perceived breakdown of the distinction between experts and non-experts.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jandrić, Petar; Hayes, David; Levinson, Paul; Christensen, Line Lisberg; Lukoko, Happiness Onesmo; Kihwele, Jimmy Ezekiel; Truelove, Ian; Mayo, Peter; Ryberg, Thomas; Monzó, Lilia D.; +74 more
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Countries: Australia, Denmark

    In March 2020 I published the ‘emergency editorial’ in Postdigital Science and Education and invited the community to ‘explore all imaginable aspects of this large social experiment that the Covid-19 pandemic has lain down in front of us’ (Jandrić 2020a: 237). Articles immediately started pouring in; within weeks, the journal’s contributions had been recognized by institutions such as the World Health Organization, the US National Library of Medicine’s Nature Public Health Emergency Collection, and UNESCO (see Jandrić 2021 for details). After publication of the October 2020 issue of Postdigital Science and Education,Footnote 1 consisting of almost 60 articles on the Covid-19 pandemic, the first wave of pandemic research has wound down. As it has become obvious that Covid-19 is here to stay, research on immediate Covid-19 experiences and responses slowly gives way to research which ‘reaches beyond the pandemic to the point where the pandemic experience is transformed from an object of research to an intrinsic part of our theories, approaches, research methodologies, and social struggles’ (Jandrić 2021: 262).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marina Romanello; Alice McGushin; Claudia Di Napoli; Paul Drummond; Nick Hughes; Louis Jamart; Harry Kennard; Pete Lampard; Baltazar Solano Rodriguez; Nigel W. Arnell; +83 more
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Countries: Italy, Italy, Peru, Peru, United Kingdom

    The Lancet Countdown is an international collaboration that independently monitors the health consequences of a changing climate. Publishing updated, new, and improved indicators each year, the Lancet Countdown represents the consensus of leading researchers from 43 academic institutions and UN agencies. The 44 indicators of this report expose an unabated rise in the health impacts of climate change and the current health consequences of the delayed and inconsistent response of countries around the globe—providing a clear imperative for accelerated action that puts the health of people and planet above all else.\ud \ud The 2021 report coincides with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26), at which countries are facing pressure to realise the ambition of the Paris Agreement to keep the global average temperature rise to 1·5°C and to mobilise the financial resources required for all countries to have an effective climate response. These negotiations unfold in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic—a global health crisis that has claimed millions of lives, affected livelihoods and communities around the globe, and exposed deep fissures and inequities in the world's capacity to cope with, and respond to, health emergencies. Yet, in its response to both crises, the world is faced with an unprecedented opportunity to ensure a healthy future for all.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anders Giovanni Møller; Rob van der Goot; Barbara Plank;
    Publisher: Association for Computational Linguistics
    Country: Denmark

    With the COVID-19 pandemic raging world-wide since the beginning of the 2020 decade, the need for monitoring systems to track relevant information on social media is vitally important. This paper describes our submission to the WNUT-2020 Task 2: Identification of informative COVID-19 English Tweets. We investigate the effectiveness for a variety of classification models, and found that domain-specific pre-trained BERT models lead to the best performance. On top of this, we attempt a variety of ensembling strategies, but these attempts did not lead to further improvements. Our final best model, the standalone CT-BERT model, proved to be highly competitive, leading to a shared first place in the shared task. Our results emphasize the importance of domain and task-related pre-training.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tríona Mary McCaffrey; Katrina Skewes McFerran; Gustavo Gattino; Sumathy Sundar;
    Countries: Ireland, Denmark

    Music therapy educators around the globe are united in their commitment to the development of the profession through the education of new professionals. Although different university programmes emphasise diverse approaches and are representative of their surrounding cultures, there is much that is shared between different programmes and educators. However, prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, there was minimal interaction between educators as a group, possibly due to time pressures and a lack of need to unite and celebrate our diversities. With the onset of the pandemic and the rapid transition to online learning, an unexpected space emerged for collective dialogue among the music therapy educator community. Brought together by the challenges imposed on professional training due to a global pandemic, a number of global educators united in discussion to seek a way forward.