Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
12,237 Research products, page 1 of 1,224

  • COVID-19
  • Publications
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • CA
  • COVID-19

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christianne de Faria Coelho-Ravagnani; Flávia Campos Corgosinho; Fabiane La Flor Ziegler Sanches; Carla M. Prado; Alessandro Laviano; João Felipe Mota;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

    Abstract Optimal nutrition can improve well-being and might mitigate the risk and morbidity associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This review summarizes nutritional guidelines to support dietary counseling provided by dietitians and health-related professionals. The majority of documents encouraged the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods. Thirty-one percent of the guidelines highlighted the importance of minerals and vitamins such as zinc and vitamins C, A, and D to maintain a well-functioning immune system. Dietary supplementation has not been linked to COVID-19 prevention. However, supplementation with vitamins C and D, as well as with zinc and selenium, was highlighted as potentially beneficial for individuals with, or at risk of, respiratory viral infections or for those in whom nutrient deficiency is detected. There was no convincing evidence that food or food packaging is associated with the transmission of COVID-19, but good hygiene practices for handling and preparing foods were recommended. No changes to breastfeeding recommendations have been made, even in women diagnosed with COVID-19.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Allie Slemon; Corey McAuliffe; Trevor Goodyear; Trevor Goodyear; Liza McGuinness; Elizabeth Shaffer; Emily K. Jenkins;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is having considerable impacts on population-level mental health, with research illustrating an increased prevalence in suicidal thoughts due to pandemic stressors. While the drivers of suicidal thoughts amid the pandemic are poorly understood, qualitative research holds great potential for expanding upon projections from pre-pandemic work and nuancing emerging epidemiological data. Despite calls for qualitative inquiry, there is a paucity of qualitative research examining experiences of suicidality related to COVID-19. The use of publicly available data from social media offers timely and pertinent information into ongoing pandemic-related mental health, including individual experiences of suicidal thoughts.Objective: To examine how Reddit users within the r/COVID19_support community describe their experiences of suicidal thoughts amid the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods: This study draws on online posts from within r/COVID19_support that describe users' suicidal thoughts during and related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected from creation of this subreddit on February 12, 2020 until December 31, 2020. A qualitative thematic analysis was conducted to generate themes reflecting users' experiences of suicidal thoughts.Results: A total of 83 posts from 57 users were included in the analysis. Posts described a range of users' lived and living experiences of suicidal thoughts related to the pandemic, including deterioration in mental health and complex emotions associated with suicidal thinking. Reddit users situated their experiences of suicidal thoughts within various pandemic stressors: social isolation, employment and finances, virus exposure and COVID-19 illness, uncertain timeline of the pandemic, news and social media, pre-existing mental health conditions, and lack of access to mental health resources. Some users described individual coping strategies and supports used in attempt to manage suicidal thoughts, however these were recognized as insufficient for addressing the multilevel stressors of the pandemic.Conclusions: Multiple and intersecting stressors have contributed to individuals' experiences of suicidal thoughts amid the COVID-19 pandemic, requiring thoughtful and complex public health responses. While ongoing challenges exist with self-disclosure of mental health challenges on social media, Reddit and other online platforms may offer a space for users to share suicidal thoughts and discuss potential coping strategies.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Katerina Pavenski;
    Publisher: Georg Thieme Verlag KG

    AbstractAn 84 year old male with a previous history of immune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (iTTP) received the first dose of COVID19 mRNA vaccine (Pfizer-Biontech). Seven days later he was diagnosed with iTTP relapse. He received in-patient treatment with therapeutic plasma exchange, high dose steroids and rituximab and subsequently recovered. This case report highlights the need to monitor patients with iTTP following vaccination.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eric A. Meyerowitz; Aaron Richterman; Isaac I. Bogoch; Nicola Low; Muge Cevik;
    Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.
    Project: EC | EpiPose (101003688), SNSF | Zika virus: causality, op... (176233), CIHR

    People with persistently asymptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection experience no symptoms throughout the course of infection, and pre-symptomatic individuals become infectious days before they report symptoms. Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from individuals without symptoms contributes to pandemic spread, but the extent of transmission from persistently asymptomatic individuals remains unknown. We describe three methodological issues that hinder attempts to estimate this proportion. First, incomplete symptom assessment probably overestimates the asymptomatic fraction. Second, studies with inadequate follow-up misclassify pre-symptomatic individuals. Third, serological studies might identify people with previously unrecognised infection, but reliance on poorly defined antibody responses and retrospective symptom assessment might result in misclassification. We provide recommendations regarding definitions, detection, documentation, and follow-up to improve the identification and evaluation of people with persistently asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and their contacts. Accurate characterisation of the persistently asymptomatic fraction of infected individuals might shed light on COVID-19 pathogenesis and transmission dynamics, and inform public health responses.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arvind Rajamani; Ashwin Subramaniam; Kiran Shekar; Jumana Haji; Jinghang Luo; Shailesh Bihari; Wai Tat Wong; Navya Gullapalli; Markus Renner; Claudia Maria Alcancia; +2 more
    Country: Australia

    Abstract Background There has been a surge in coronavirus disease 2019 admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) in Asia-Pacific countries. Because ICU healthcare workers are exposed to aerosol-generating procedures, ensuring optimal personal protective equipment (PPE) preparedness is important. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate PPE preparedness across ICUs in six Asia-Pacific countries during the initial phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, which is defined by the World Health Organization as guideline adherence, training healthcare workers, procuring stocks, and responding appropriately to suspected cases. Methods A cross-sectional Web-based survey was circulated to 633 level II/III ICUs of Australia, New Zealand (NZ), Singapore, Hong Kong (HK), India, and the Philippines. Findings Two hundred sixty-three intensivists responded, representing 231 individual ICUs eligible for analysis. Response rates were 68–100% in all countries except India, where it was 24%. Ninety-seven percent of ICUs either conformed to or exceeded World Health Organization recommendations for PPE practice. Fifty-nine percent ICUs used airborne precautions irrespective of aerosol generation procedures. There were variations in negative-pressure room use (highest in HK/Singapore), training (best in NZ), and PPE stock awareness (best in HK/Singapore/NZ). High-flow nasal oxygenation and noninvasive ventilation were not options in most HK (66.7% and 83.3%, respectively) and Singapore ICUs (50% and 80%, respectively), but were considered in other countries to a greater extent. Thirty-eight percent ICUs reported not having specialised airway teams. Showering and “buddy systems” were underused. Clinical waste disposal training was suboptimal (38%). Conclusions Many ICUs in the Asia-Pacific reported suboptimal PPE preparedness in several domains, particularly related to PPE training, practice, and stock awareness, which requires remediation. Adoption of low-cost approaches such as buddy systems should be encouraged. The complete avoidance of high-flow nasal oxygenation reported by several intensivists needs reconsideration. Consideration must be given to standardise PPE guidelines to minimise practice variations. Urgent research to evaluate PPE preparedness and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 transmission is required.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kelly Dean Schwartz; Deinera Exner-Cortens; Carly A. McMorris; Erica Makarenko; Paul D. Arnold; Marisa Van Bavel; Sarah Williams; Rachel Canfield;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Project: CIHR

    Students have been multiply impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic: threats to their own and their family’s health, the closure of schools, and pivoting to online learning in March 2020, a long summer of physical distancing, and then the challenge of returning to school in fall 2020. As damaging as the physical health effects of a global pandemic are, much has been speculated about the “second wave” of mental health crises, particularly for school-aged children and adolescents. Yet, few studies have asked students about their experiences during the pandemic. The present study engaged with over two thousand ( N = 2,310; 1,288 female; Mage = 14.5) 12- to 18-year-old Alberta students during their first few weeks of return-to-school in fall 2020. Students completed an online survey that asked about their perceptions of COVID-19, their fall return-to-school experiences (84.9% returned in-person), their self-reported pandemic-related stress, and their behavior, affect, and cognitive functioning in the first few weeks of September. The majority of students (84.9%) returned to school in person. Students reported moderate and equal concern for their health, family confinement, and maintaining social contact. Student stress levels were also above critical thresholds for 25% of the sample, and females and older adolescents (age 15–18 years) generally reported higher stress indicators as compared to males and younger (age 12–14 years) adolescents. Multivariate analysis showed that stress indicators were positively and significantly correlated with self-reported behavioral concerns (i.e., conduct problems, negative affect, and cognitive/inattention), and that stress arousal (e.g., sleep problems, hypervigilance) accounted for significant variance in behavioral concerns. Results are discussed in the context of how schools can provide both universal responses to students during COVID-19 knowing that most students are coping well, while some may require more targeted strategies to address stress arousal and heightened negative affect.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mellado-Artigas, Ricard; Ferreyro, Bruno L.; Angriman, Federico; Hernández-Sanz, María; Arruti, Egoitz; Torres, Antoni; Villar, Jesús; Brochard, Laurent; Ferrando, Carlos;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 1. It contains further information on methodology as well as 4 tables and 2 figures.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kariem El-Boghdadly; Danny J.N. Wong; Ruth Owen; Mark D. Neuman; Stuart J. Pocock; J. B. Carlisle; C. Johnstone; P. Andruszkiewicz; Paul A. Baker; Bruce M Biccard; +13 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: United Kingdom

    Summary Healthcare workers involved in aerosol‐generating procedures, such as tracheal intubation, may be at elevated risk of acquiring COVID‐19. However, the magnitude of this risk is unknown. We conducted a prospective international multicentre cohort study recruiting healthcare workers participating in tracheal intubation of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID‐19. Information on tracheal intubation episodes, personal protective equipment use, and subsequent provider health status was collected via self‐reporting. The primary endpoint was the incidence of laboratory‐confirmed COVID‐19 diagnosis or new symptoms requiring self‐isolation or hospitalisation after a tracheal intubation episode. Cox regression analysis examined associations between the primary endpoint and healthcare worker characteristics, procedure‐related factors, and personal protective equipment use. Between 23 March and 2 June 2020, 1718 healthcare workers from 503 hospitals in 17 countries reported 5148 tracheal intubation episodes. The overall incidence of the primary endpoint was 10.7% over a median (IQR [range]) follow‐up of 32 (18–48 [0–116]) days. The cumulative incidence within 7, 14 and 21 days of the first tracheal intubation episode was 3.6%, 6.1%, and 8.5%, respectively. The risk of the primary endpoint varied by country and was higher in females, but was not associated with other factors. Around 1 in 10 healthcare workers involved in tracheal intubation of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID‐19 subsequently reported a COVID‐19 outcome. This has human resource implications for institutional capacity to deliver essential healthcare services, and wider societal implications for COVID‐19 transmission.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scott J. Adams; Carole Dennie;
    Publisher: Joule Inc.

    The diagnosis of COVID-19 is based on clinical symptoms and a positive reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay.[1][1] Chest radiography has been reported to have 25%–69% sensitivity, with limited data regarding specificity,[2][2],[3][3] compared with computed tomography (CT

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Butler-Laporte, Guillaume; Gonzalez-Kozlova, Edgar; Su, Chen-Yang; Zhou, Sirui; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Brunet-Ratnasingham, Elsa; Morrison, David; Laurent, Laetitia; Afilalo, Jonathan; Afilalo, Marc; +54 more
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Protein correlation heatmaps.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
12,237 Research products, page 1 of 1,224
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christianne de Faria Coelho-Ravagnani; Flávia Campos Corgosinho; Fabiane La Flor Ziegler Sanches; Carla M. Prado; Alessandro Laviano; João Felipe Mota;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

    Abstract Optimal nutrition can improve well-being and might mitigate the risk and morbidity associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This review summarizes nutritional guidelines to support dietary counseling provided by dietitians and health-related professionals. The majority of documents encouraged the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods. Thirty-one percent of the guidelines highlighted the importance of minerals and vitamins such as zinc and vitamins C, A, and D to maintain a well-functioning immune system. Dietary supplementation has not been linked to COVID-19 prevention. However, supplementation with vitamins C and D, as well as with zinc and selenium, was highlighted as potentially beneficial for individuals with, or at risk of, respiratory viral infections or for those in whom nutrient deficiency is detected. There was no convincing evidence that food or food packaging is associated with the transmission of COVID-19, but good hygiene practices for handling and preparing foods were recommended. No changes to breastfeeding recommendations have been made, even in women diagnosed with COVID-19.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Allie Slemon; Corey McAuliffe; Trevor Goodyear; Trevor Goodyear; Liza McGuinness; Elizabeth Shaffer; Emily K. Jenkins;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is having considerable impacts on population-level mental health, with research illustrating an increased prevalence in suicidal thoughts due to pandemic stressors. While the drivers of suicidal thoughts amid the pandemic are poorly understood, qualitative research holds great potential for expanding upon projections from pre-pandemic work and nuancing emerging epidemiological data. Despite calls for qualitative inquiry, there is a paucity of qualitative research examining experiences of suicidality related to COVID-19. The use of publicly available data from social media offers timely and pertinent information into ongoing pandemic-related mental health, including individual experiences of suicidal thoughts.Objective: To examine how Reddit users within the r/COVID19_support community describe their experiences of suicidal thoughts amid the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods: This study draws on online posts from within r/COVID19_support that describe users' suicidal thoughts during and related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected from creation of this subreddit on February 12, 2020 until December 31, 2020. A qualitative thematic analysis was conducted to generate themes reflecting users' experiences of suicidal thoughts.Results: A total of 83 posts from 57 users were included in the analysis. Posts described a range of users' lived and living experiences of suicidal thoughts related to the pandemic, including deterioration in mental health and complex emotions associated with suicidal thinking. Reddit users situated their experiences of suicidal thoughts within various pandemic stressors: social isolation, employment and finances, virus exposure and COVID-19 illness, uncertain timeline of the pandemic, news and social media, pre-existing mental health conditions, and lack of access to mental health resources. Some users described individual coping strategies and supports used in attempt to manage suicidal thoughts, however these were recognized as insufficient for addressing the multilevel stressors of the pandemic.Conclusions: Multiple and intersecting stressors have contributed to individuals' experiences of suicidal thoughts amid the COVID-19 pandemic, requiring thoughtful and complex public health responses. While ongoing challenges exist with self-disclosure of mental health challenges on social media, Reddit and other online platforms may offer a space for users to share suicidal thoughts and discuss potential coping strategies.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Katerina Pavenski;
    Publisher: Georg Thieme Verlag KG

    AbstractAn 84 year old male with a previous history of immune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (iTTP) received the first dose of COVID19 mRNA vaccine (Pfizer-Biontech). Seven days later he was diagnosed with iTTP relapse. He received in-patient treatment with therapeutic plasma exchange, high dose steroids and rituximab and subsequently recovered. This case report highlights the need to monitor patients with iTTP following vaccination.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eric A. Meyerowitz; Aaron Richterman; Isaac I. Bogoch; Nicola Low; Muge Cevik;
    Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.
    Project: EC | EpiPose (101003688), SNSF | Zika virus: causality, op... (176233), CIHR

    People with persistently asymptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection experience no symptoms throughout the course of infection, and pre-symptomatic individuals become infectious days before they report symptoms. Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from individuals without symptoms contributes to pandemic spread, but the extent of transmission from persistently asymptomatic individuals remains unknown. We describe three methodological issues that hinder attempts to estimate this proportion. First, incomplete symptom assessment probably overestimates the asymptomatic fraction. Second, studies with inadequate follow-up misclassify pre-symptomatic individuals. Third, serological studies might identify people with previously unrecognised infection, but reliance on poorly defined antibody responses and retrospective symptom assessment might result in misclassification. We provide recommendations regarding definitions, detection, documentation, and follow-up to improve the identification and evaluation of people with persistently asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and their contacts. Accurate characterisation of the persistently asymptomatic fraction of infected individuals might shed light on COVID-19 pathogenesis and transmission dynamics, and inform public health responses.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arvind Rajamani; Ashwin Subramaniam; Kiran Shekar; Jumana Haji; Jinghang Luo; Shailesh Bihari; Wai Tat Wong; Navya Gullapalli; Markus Renner; Claudia Maria Alcancia; +2 more
    Country: Australia

    Abstract Background There has been a surge in coronavirus disease 2019 admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) in Asia-Pacific countries. Because ICU healthcare workers are exposed to aerosol-generating procedures, ensuring optimal personal protective equipment (PPE) preparedness is important. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate PPE preparedness across ICUs in six Asia-Pacific countries during the initial phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, which is defined by the World Health Organization as guideline adherence, training healthcare workers, procuring stocks, and responding appropriately to suspected cases. Methods A cross-sectional Web-based survey was circulated to 633 level II/III ICUs of Australia, New Zealand (NZ), Singapore, Hong Kong (HK), India, and the Philippines. Findings Two hundred sixty-three intensivists responded, representing 231 individual ICUs eligible for analysis. Response rates were 68–100% in all countries except India, where it was 24%. Ninety-seven percent of ICUs either conformed to or exceeded World Health Organization recommendations for PPE practice. Fifty-nine percent ICUs used airborne precautions irrespective of aerosol generation procedures. There were variations in negative-pressure room use (highest in HK/Singapore), training (best in NZ), and PPE stock awareness (best in HK/Singapore/NZ). High-flow nasal oxygenation and noninvasive ventilation were not options in most HK (66.7% and 83.3%, respectively) and Singapore ICUs (50% and 80%, respectively), but were considered in other countries to a greater extent. Thirty-eight percent ICUs reported not having specialised airway teams. Showering and “buddy systems” were underused. Clinical waste disposal training was suboptimal (38%). Conclusions Many ICUs in the Asia-Pacific reported suboptimal PPE preparedness in several domains, particularly related to PPE training, practice, and stock awareness, which requires remediation. Adoption of low-cost approaches such as buddy systems should be encouraged. The complete avoidance of high-flow nasal oxygenation reported by several intensivists needs reconsideration. Consideration must be given to standardise PPE guidelines to minimise practice variations. Urgent research to evaluate PPE preparedness and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 transmission is required.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kelly Dean Schwartz; Deinera Exner-Cortens; Carly A. McMorris; Erica Makarenko; Paul D. Arnold; Marisa Van Bavel; Sarah Williams; Rachel Canfield;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Project: CIHR

    Students have been multiply impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic: threats to their own and their family’s health, the closure of schools, and pivoting to online learning in March 2020, a long summer of physical distancing, and then the challenge of returning to school in fall 2020. As damaging as the physical health effects of a global pandemic are, much has been speculated about the “second wave” of mental health crises, particularly for school-aged children and adolescents. Yet, few studies have asked students about their experiences during the pandemic. The present study engaged with over two thousand ( N = 2,310; 1,288 female; Mage = 14.5) 12- to 18-year-old Alberta students during their first few weeks of return-to-school in fall 2020. Students completed an online survey that asked about their perceptions of COVID-19, their fall return-to-school experiences (84.9% returned in-person), their self-reported pandemic-related stress, and their behavior, affect, and cognitive functioning in the first few weeks of September. The majority of students (84.9%) returned to school in person. Students reported moderate and equal concern for their health, family confinement, and maintaining social contact. Student stress levels were also above critical thresholds for 25% of the sample, and females and older adolescents (age 15–18 years) generally reported higher stress indicators as compared to males and younger (age 12–14 years) adolescents. Multivariate analysis showed that stress indicators were positively and significantly correlated with self-reported behavioral concerns (i.e., conduct problems, negative affect, and cognitive/inattention), and that stress arousal (e.g., sleep problems, hypervigilance) accounted for significant variance in behavioral concerns. Results are discussed in the context of how schools can provide both universal responses to students during COVID-19 knowing that most students are coping well, while some may require more targeted strategies to address stress arousal and heightened negative affect.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mellado-Artigas, Ricard; Ferreyro, Bruno L.; Angriman, Federico; Hernández-Sanz, María; Arruti, Egoitz; Torres, Antoni; Villar, Jesús; Brochard, Laurent; Ferrando, Carlos;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 1. It contains further information on methodology as well as 4 tables and 2 figures.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kariem El-Boghdadly; Danny J.N. Wong; Ruth Owen; Mark D. Neuman; Stuart J. Pocock; J. B. Carlisle; C. Johnstone; P. Andruszkiewicz; Paul A. Baker; Bruce M Biccard; +13 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: United Kingdom

    Summary Healthcare workers involved in aerosol‐generating procedures, such as tracheal intubation, may be at elevated risk of acquiring COVID‐19. However, the magnitude of this risk is unknown. We conducted a prospective international multicentre cohort study recruiting healthcare workers participating in tracheal intubation of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID‐19. Information on tracheal intubation episodes, personal protective equipment use, and subsequent provider health status was collected via self‐reporting. The primary endpoint was the incidence of laboratory‐confirmed COVID‐19 diagnosis or new symptoms requiring self‐isolation or hospitalisation after a tracheal intubation episode. Cox regression analysis examined associations between the primary endpoint and healthcare worker characteristics, procedure‐related factors, and personal protective equipment use. Between 23 March and 2 June 2020, 1718 healthcare workers from 503 hospitals in 17 countries reported 5148 tracheal intubation episodes. The overall incidence of the primary endpoint was 10.7% over a median (IQR [range]) follow‐up of 32 (18–48 [0–116]) days. The cumulative incidence within 7, 14 and 21 days of the first tracheal intubation episode was 3.6%, 6.1%, and 8.5%, respectively. The risk of the primary endpoint varied by country and was higher in females, but was not associated with other factors. Around 1 in 10 healthcare workers involved in tracheal intubation of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID‐19 subsequently reported a COVID‐19 outcome. This has human resource implications for institutional capacity to deliver essential healthcare services, and wider societal implications for COVID‐19 transmission.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scott J. Adams; Carole Dennie;
    Publisher: Joule Inc.

    The diagnosis of COVID-19 is based on clinical symptoms and a positive reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay.[1][1] Chest radiography has been reported to have 25%–69% sensitivity, with limited data regarding specificity,[2][2],[3][3] compared with computed tomography (CT

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Butler-Laporte, Guillaume; Gonzalez-Kozlova, Edgar; Su, Chen-Yang; Zhou, Sirui; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Brunet-Ratnasingham, Elsa; Morrison, David; Laurent, Laetitia; Afilalo, Jonathan; Afilalo, Marc; +54 more
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Protein correlation heatmaps.