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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
473 Research products, page 1 of 48

  • COVID-19
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  • 2013-2022
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  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dimitrios Farmakis; Anastasios Giakoumis; Lily Cannon; Michael Angastiniotis; Androulla Eleftheriou;
    Publisher: Wiley

    Abstract Objectives Many patients with haemoglobinopathies, including thalassaemia and sickle cell disease, are at increased risk of developing severe complications from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19). Although epidemiologic evidence concerning the novel coronavirus (SARS‐CoV‐2) infection in these patients is currently lacking, the COVID‐19 pandemic represents a significant challenge for haemoglobinopathy patients, their families and their attending physicians. Methods The present statement summarizes the key challenges concerning the management of haemoglobinopathies, with particular focus on patients with either transfusion‐dependent or non‐transfusion‐dependent thalassaemia, identifies the gaps in knowledge and suggests measures and strategies to deal with the pandemic, based on available evidence and expert opinions. Key areas covered include patients’ risk level, adaptation of haemoglobinopathy care, safety of blood transfusions, blood supply challenges, and lifestyle and nutritional considerations. Conclusions The proposed measures and strategies may be useful as a blueprint for other disorders which require regular hospital visits, as well as for the timely adaptation of patient care during similar future pandemics.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gerorge Pallis;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nishil Patel; Jason Kho; Kirsty E. Smith; Alia Ahmed; Koenraad Van den Abbeele; Amit K J Mandal; Constantinos G Missouris;
    Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bobby Lo; Anna Mokrowiecka; A. Mikocka-Walus; Charles N. Bernstein; Inês A. Trindade; Johan Burisch; M. Barreiro-de Acosta; Nuno Ferreira; Richard B. Gearry; Simon R. Knowles;

    Abstract Background Although several studies have reported the impact of fears relating to COVID-19 on several chronic illness populations, there are few studies focused on gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. The aim was to compare how fear of COVID-19 is manifested in people living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) compared to other GI conditions; and, how fear of COVID-19 is manifested across different demographic backgrounds (employment status, education level and country of residence) among IBD respondents using a large international sample. Methods Participants with a GI condition (≥18years of age) were recruited from 22 countries through a web-based questionnaire. Demographic, clinical, and psychosocial information was collected in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. An adaptation of the scale developed for IBD by Trindade & Ferreira (2020) measuring fear of COVID-19 (FoC; original items 1–9) and GI specific fear of COVID-19 (GI-FoC; new items 10–14) was used. Results In 831 participants (312 IBD), there were no significant differences in FoC between IBD and other GI conditions; whilst significant increases in GI-FoC were found in IBD respondents (mean [SD]: 13.5 [5.5] vs. 10.9 [5.0], p<0.01). The greatest fears of IBD respondents were: their condition would get worse; impact on access to medical support; being at increased risk of getting COVID-19; and being at increased risk of death if they got COVID-19. Among IBD respondents, persons on sick leave had significantly more general FoC than those who were employed, and significantly more GI-FoC compared to the employed or respondents outside of the labour market (Figures 1a and 1b). Persons living in a rural setting had significantly more general FoC and GI-FoC (Figures 2a and 2b). These persons were fearful of contracting COVID-19, having contact with someone with respiratory symptoms, having contact with healthcare professionals, going outside, meeting people, having contact with someone who was in contact with an infected person, having contact with someone infected with COVID-19, and that their IBD means being at increased risk of death if they got COVID-19. There were no differences in general FoC and GI-FoC according to educational background. However, respondents with higher education were less afraid of dying from COVID-19. Conclusion Respondents with IBD are more afraid of the consequences of COVID-19 due to their disease compared to other GI diseases; especially, persons on sick leave or persons living in a rural setting. Persons with higher education were less afraid of dying from COVID-19. These findings should be taken into consideration to personalise the support health-care providers can offer in mitigating fear related to COVID-19 in IBD patients.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Danielle E. M. C. Jansen; Danielle E. M. C. Jansen; Johanna P. M. Vervoort; Károly E. Illy; Károly E. Illy; Adamos Hadjipanayis; Adamos Hadjipanayis;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Netherlands

    Objectives: After childcare and schools have been closed in March 2020 to prevent the spread of COVID-19, they were open again in most European countries after the summer holidays till early autumn. Aim of this study is to give an overview and to compare COVID-19 childcare and school containment policies in 19 European countries.Methods: We collected data on containment measures among delegates of the European Academy of Pediatrics (EAP), through an online, closed questionnaire in the second half of October 2020.Results: Most policy has been formulated for secondary education. In all three settings policy was most often formulated for individual hygiene, cleaning of surfaces, exclusion of sick children, ventilation, distance between children and between children and teachers. In secondary schools, policy is formulated on face masks in and outside the class. School closure, cancellation of physical education and class size reduction are measures for which the fewest countries have formulated national policies.Conclusion: We recommend to accompany the opening of children’s facilities and schools by surveillance studies that further clarify questions about control measures implemented to halt COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Authors: 
    Konstantinos Alexandris; T. Karagiorgos; A. Ntovoli; S. Zourladani;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    This paper aimed to examine fitness club members’ willingness to start exercising in the clubs with the end of the lockdown. The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) was used in order to explore which...

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yuen Yu Chong; Wai Tong Chien; Ho Yu Cheng; Angelos P. Kassianos; Andrew T. Gloster; Maria Karekla;
    Publisher: BioMed Central
    Countries: Cyprus, Switzerland

    Abstract Background The negative impact of COVID-19 pandemic on public mental health can be persistent and substantial over a long period of time, but little is known regarding what psychological factors or processes can buffer such impact. The present study aimed to examine the mediating roles of coping, psychological flexibility and prosociality in the impacts of perceived illness threats toward COVID-19 on mental health. Method Five-hundred and fourteen Hong Kong citizens (18 years or above) completed an online survey to measure illness perceptions toward COVID-19, coping, psychological flexibility, prosociality, and mental health, together with their socio-demographic variables. Structural equation modelling was used to explore the explanatory model that was the best-fit to illustrate the relationships between these constructs. Results Serial mediation structural equation model showed that only psychological flexibility (unstandardised beta coefficient, β = − 0.12, 95% CI [− 0.20, − 0.02], p = 0.031) and prosociality (unstandardised β = 0.04, 95% CI [0.01, 0.08], p = 0.001) fully mediated the relationship between illness perceptions toward COVID-19 and mental health. In addition, psychological flexibility exerted a direct effect on prosociality (standardised β = 0.22, 95% CI [0.12, 0.32], p < 0.001). This best-fit model explained 62% of the variance of mental health. Conclusions Fostering psychological flexibility and prosocial behaviour may play significant roles in mitigating the adverse effects of COVID-19 and its perceived threats on public mental health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gagan Deep Sharma; Amarpreet Singh Ghura; Mandeep Mahendru; Mandeep Mahendru; Burak Erkut; Burak Erkut; Tavleen Kaur; Deepali Bedi;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.

    The outbreak of COVID-19 has spread to the entire world and is severely affecting social psychology. We conducted semi-structured interviews on 59 subjects from India to investigate the impact of information, misinfodemics (spread of wrong information), and isolation on their psychology. We perform qualitative analysis on the data. Our findings reveal that flow of information leads to anxiety, caution, and knowledge; while misinfodemics cause panic, distrust, and confusion; and isolation creates cognitive dissonance (the state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes) and adaptability among masses. The encouraging part of our findings is that, as of now, the situation is far from the state of depression. Practically, our research calls upon the government to support the masses in fighting through the crisis by focusing on pointed psychological counseling. We contribute theoretically to the body of knowledge in the field of social psychology, which is studying the psychological interventions to avoid panic amid pandemic. Future researchers in the area would do well by detailing the psychological interventions required to contain the negative impacts of the pandemic on social psychology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eden, Viktoria;
    Publisher: Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cyprus Universtiy of Technology
    Country: Cyprus

    Background: Talking Mats (TM) is a tool used in the Augmentative and Alternative communication field. It can support people with complex communication needs, such as people with aphasia. Existing research on TM focus on its use as a communication instrument (Murphy, Cameron & Boa, 2013). Objective: This study explores for the first time the effects of using TM in Speech and Language therapy as a treatment method on communication abilities and Quality of Life (QoL) in a person with aphasia. Methods and Procedures: The study followed an AB design with multiple baselines. The participant is a 35 year old female with mild, anomic aphasia, 6 years post onset. At baseline levels, the Western Aphasia Battery and the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39) was administered to the participant, followed by a 10 days consecutive use of TM in a therapeutic setting. Results: The biggest improvement was captured in word fluency by 25, 58%. The mean of the psychosocial score decreased by 9, 86%. Conclusion: TM might serve as a method to train vocabulary recall and discourse in people with anomic aphasia. It is suggested, that a decrease in QoL is correlated to the Covid-19 restrictions during this study. Completed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Koutsou, Giannis; Alexandrou, Constantia; Harmandaris, Vangelis; Savva, Nikos; Irakleous, Anastasios;
    Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
    Project: EC | SimEA (810660)

    We present two different approaches for modeling the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both approaches are based on the population classes susceptible, exposed, infectious, quarantined, and recovered and allow for an arbitrary number of subgroups with different infection rates and different levels of testing. The first model is derived from a set of ordinary differential equations that incorporates the rates at which population transitions take place among classes. The other is a particle model, which is a specific case of crowd simulation model, in which the disease is transmitted through particle collisions and infection rates are varied by adjusting the particle velocities. The parameters of these two models are tuned using information on COVID-19 from the literature and country-specific data, including the effect of restrictions as they were imposed and lifted. We demonstrate the applicability of both models using data from Cyprus, for which we find that both models yield very similar results, giving confidence in the predictions. Comment: Changes in v2: Updated to match published version; 21 pages, 8 figures, 1 table

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
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includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
473 Research products, page 1 of 48
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dimitrios Farmakis; Anastasios Giakoumis; Lily Cannon; Michael Angastiniotis; Androulla Eleftheriou;
    Publisher: Wiley

    Abstract Objectives Many patients with haemoglobinopathies, including thalassaemia and sickle cell disease, are at increased risk of developing severe complications from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19). Although epidemiologic evidence concerning the novel coronavirus (SARS‐CoV‐2) infection in these patients is currently lacking, the COVID‐19 pandemic represents a significant challenge for haemoglobinopathy patients, their families and their attending physicians. Methods The present statement summarizes the key challenges concerning the management of haemoglobinopathies, with particular focus on patients with either transfusion‐dependent or non‐transfusion‐dependent thalassaemia, identifies the gaps in knowledge and suggests measures and strategies to deal with the pandemic, based on available evidence and expert opinions. Key areas covered include patients’ risk level, adaptation of haemoglobinopathy care, safety of blood transfusions, blood supply challenges, and lifestyle and nutritional considerations. Conclusions The proposed measures and strategies may be useful as a blueprint for other disorders which require regular hospital visits, as well as for the timely adaptation of patient care during similar future pandemics.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gerorge Pallis;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nishil Patel; Jason Kho; Kirsty E. Smith; Alia Ahmed; Koenraad Van den Abbeele; Amit K J Mandal; Constantinos G Missouris;
    Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Inc.
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bobby Lo; Anna Mokrowiecka; A. Mikocka-Walus; Charles N. Bernstein; Inês A. Trindade; Johan Burisch; M. Barreiro-de Acosta; Nuno Ferreira; Richard B. Gearry; Simon R. Knowles;

    Abstract Background Although several studies have reported the impact of fears relating to COVID-19 on several chronic illness populations, there are few studies focused on gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. The aim was to compare how fear of COVID-19 is manifested in people living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) compared to other GI conditions; and, how fear of COVID-19 is manifested across different demographic backgrounds (employment status, education level and country of residence) among IBD respondents using a large international sample. Methods Participants with a GI condition (≥18years of age) were recruited from 22 countries through a web-based questionnaire. Demographic, clinical, and psychosocial information was collected in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. An adaptation of the scale developed for IBD by Trindade & Ferreira (2020) measuring fear of COVID-19 (FoC; original items 1–9) and GI specific fear of COVID-19 (GI-FoC; new items 10–14) was used. Results In 831 participants (312 IBD), there were no significant differences in FoC between IBD and other GI conditions; whilst significant increases in GI-FoC were found in IBD respondents (mean [SD]: 13.5 [5.5] vs. 10.9 [5.0], p&lt;0.01). The greatest fears of IBD respondents were: their condition would get worse; impact on access to medical support; being at increased risk of getting COVID-19; and being at increased risk of death if they got COVID-19. Among IBD respondents, persons on sick leave had significantly more general FoC than those who were employed, and significantly more GI-FoC compared to the employed or respondents outside of the labour market (Figures 1a and 1b). Persons living in a rural setting had significantly more general FoC and GI-FoC (Figures 2a and 2b). These persons were fearful of contracting COVID-19, having contact with someone with respiratory symptoms, having contact with healthcare professionals, going outside, meeting people, having contact with someone who was in contact with an infected person, having contact with someone infected with COVID-19, and that their IBD means being at increased risk of death if they got COVID-19. There were no differences in general FoC and GI-FoC according to educational background. However, respondents with higher education were less afraid of dying from COVID-19. Conclusion Respondents with IBD are more afraid of the consequences of COVID-19 due to their disease compared to other GI diseases; especially, persons on sick leave or persons living in a rural setting. Persons with higher education were less afraid of dying from COVID-19. These findings should be taken into consideration to personalise the support health-care providers can offer in mitigating fear related to COVID-19 in IBD patients.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Danielle E. M. C. Jansen; Danielle E. M. C. Jansen; Johanna P. M. Vervoort; Károly E. Illy; Károly E. Illy; Adamos Hadjipanayis; Adamos Hadjipanayis;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Netherlands

    Objectives: After childcare and schools have been closed in March 2020 to prevent the spread of COVID-19, they were open again in most European countries after the summer holidays till early autumn. Aim of this study is to give an overview and to compare COVID-19 childcare and school containment policies in 19 European countries.Methods: We collected data on containment measures among delegates of the European Academy of Pediatrics (EAP), through an online, closed questionnaire in the second half of October 2020.Results: Most policy has been formulated for secondary education. In all three settings policy was most often formulated for individual hygiene, cleaning of surfaces, exclusion of sick children, ventilation, distance between children and between children and teachers. In secondary schools, policy is formulated on face masks in and outside the class. School closure, cancellation of physical education and class size reduction are measures for which the fewest countries have formulated national policies.Conclusion: We recommend to accompany the opening of children’s facilities and schools by surveillance studies that further clarify questions about control measures implemented to halt COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Authors: 
    Konstantinos Alexandris; T. Karagiorgos; A. Ntovoli; S. Zourladani;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    This paper aimed to examine fitness club members’ willingness to start exercising in the clubs with the end of the lockdown. The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) was used in order to explore which...

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yuen Yu Chong; Wai Tong Chien; Ho Yu Cheng; Angelos P. Kassianos; Andrew T. Gloster; Maria Karekla;
    Publisher: BioMed Central
    Countries: Cyprus, Switzerland

    Abstract Background The negative impact of COVID-19 pandemic on public mental health can be persistent and substantial over a long period of time, but little is known regarding what psychological factors or processes can buffer such impact. The present study aimed to examine the mediating roles of coping, psychological flexibility and prosociality in the impacts of perceived illness threats toward COVID-19 on mental health. Method Five-hundred and fourteen Hong Kong citizens (18 years or above) completed an online survey to measure illness perceptions toward COVID-19, coping, psychological flexibility, prosociality, and mental health, together with their socio-demographic variables. Structural equation modelling was used to explore the explanatory model that was the best-fit to illustrate the relationships between these constructs. Results Serial mediation structural equation model showed that only psychological flexibility (unstandardised beta coefficient, β = − 0.12, 95% CI [− 0.20, − 0.02], p = 0.031) and prosociality (unstandardised β = 0.04, 95% CI [0.01, 0.08], p = 0.001) fully mediated the relationship between illness perceptions toward COVID-19 and mental health. In addition, psychological flexibility exerted a direct effect on prosociality (standardised β = 0.22, 95% CI [0.12, 0.32], p < 0.001). This best-fit model explained 62% of the variance of mental health. Conclusions Fostering psychological flexibility and prosocial behaviour may play significant roles in mitigating the adverse effects of COVID-19 and its perceived threats on public mental health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gagan Deep Sharma; Amarpreet Singh Ghura; Mandeep Mahendru; Mandeep Mahendru; Burak Erkut; Burak Erkut; Tavleen Kaur; Deepali Bedi;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.

    The outbreak of COVID-19 has spread to the entire world and is severely affecting social psychology. We conducted semi-structured interviews on 59 subjects from India to investigate the impact of information, misinfodemics (spread of wrong information), and isolation on their psychology. We perform qualitative analysis on the data. Our findings reveal that flow of information leads to anxiety, caution, and knowledge; while misinfodemics cause panic, distrust, and confusion; and isolation creates cognitive dissonance (the state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes) and adaptability among masses. The encouraging part of our findings is that, as of now, the situation is far from the state of depression. Practically, our research calls upon the government to support the masses in fighting through the crisis by focusing on pointed psychological counseling. We contribute theoretically to the body of knowledge in the field of social psychology, which is studying the psychological interventions to avoid panic amid pandemic. Future researchers in the area would do well by detailing the psychological interventions required to contain the negative impacts of the pandemic on social psychology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eden, Viktoria;
    Publisher: Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cyprus Universtiy of Technology
    Country: Cyprus

    Background: Talking Mats (TM) is a tool used in the Augmentative and Alternative communication field. It can support people with complex communication needs, such as people with aphasia. Existing research on TM focus on its use as a communication instrument (Murphy, Cameron & Boa, 2013). Objective: This study explores for the first time the effects of using TM in Speech and Language therapy as a treatment method on communication abilities and Quality of Life (QoL) in a person with aphasia. Methods and Procedures: The study followed an AB design with multiple baselines. The participant is a 35 year old female with mild, anomic aphasia, 6 years post onset. At baseline levels, the Western Aphasia Battery and the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39) was administered to the participant, followed by a 10 days consecutive use of TM in a therapeutic setting. Results: The biggest improvement was captured in word fluency by 25, 58%. The mean of the psychosocial score decreased by 9, 86%. Conclusion: TM might serve as a method to train vocabulary recall and discourse in people with anomic aphasia. It is suggested, that a decrease in QoL is correlated to the Covid-19 restrictions during this study. Completed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Koutsou, Giannis; Alexandrou, Constantia; Harmandaris, Vangelis; Savva, Nikos; Irakleous, Anastasios;
    Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
    Project: EC | SimEA (810660)

    We present two different approaches for modeling the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both approaches are based on the population classes susceptible, exposed, infectious, quarantined, and recovered and allow for an arbitrary number of subgroups with different infection rates and different levels of testing. The first model is derived from a set of ordinary differential equations that incorporates the rates at which population transitions take place among classes. The other is a particle model, which is a specific case of crowd simulation model, in which the disease is transmitted through particle collisions and infection rates are varied by adjusting the particle velocities. The parameters of these two models are tuned using information on COVID-19 from the literature and country-specific data, including the effect of restrictions as they were imposed and lifted. We demonstrate the applicability of both models using data from Cyprus, for which we find that both models yield very similar results, giving confidence in the predictions. Comment: Changes in v2: Updated to match published version; 21 pages, 8 figures, 1 table