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  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Woodward, Ian; Banke, Signe;
    Country: Denmark

    On March 6, Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen declared that all gatherings over 1000 people would be banned until at least August 31, 2020. This announcement, and subsequent further reductions in gathering numbers, effectively ‘cancelled the summer’ of music festivals and much more in 2020. In this paper, based on a study of three music festivals in Denmark, we focus on the un-making of music festivals and their creative re-making across diverse social spaces and contexts by multiple agents in response to the trauma of cancellation. The absence of music festivals points actors to a Corona-induced social and cultural lack, an emblematic fact referring to the loss of spaces of intense sociality and connection which we interpret via literatures on compressed cultural trauma. Our field research shows that lack and loss are not the defining features of this event. Instead, a suite of strategies is enacted to protect and repair the festival ritual, its history, community, and commercial interests in the wake of Corona’s attack. The paper draws upon extensive ethnographic and qualitative research, including a 7-month ongoing longitudinal phase of interviews with audiences and various types of organisers associated with three cancelled Danish music festivals, as well as a 9-month ongoing large-scale longitudinal media and netnographic analysis. We examine how agents of festivalisation - festival organisers, musicians, audiences, local entrepreneurs, and festival spaces – have gone about remembering, commemorating, and mobilising festivals in the wake of Corona. We explore the ways festival agents use materials, spaces, symbolic resources and creative strategies to respond to the external threat of the virus and reflect on who these festival agents are acting for, what they end up making, and why. Specificities of responses differ depending on festival type, history and context. Further, responses are also relationally and temporo-spatially anchored to interpretation of wider Corona developments. However, we observe widespread evidence of creative re-materialisations of festival experiences, pointing to processes of remembrance, repair, and the ongoing constructive re-making of ritual festival experience in novel contexts.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Bollig, Georg;
    Country: Denmark

    1. Background and GoalsA major challenge for public palliative care is to support all people who want to die at home. Last Aid Courses (LAC) have been started in 2015 to educate citizens and to empower them to participate in end-of-life care. The main goals of the International Last Aid project were to establish an International Last Aid working group and to provide and evaluate public palliative care education for citizens. 2. MethodsBetween 2017 and 2019 an International Last Aid working group with representatives from different countries and national organisations from e.g. palliative care, health-services, and the church as cooperation partners has been established. The curriculum and contents of the International Last Aid course are revised every other year by the International Last Aid working group. Scientific evaluation of LAC is coordinated by the international Last Aid Research Group Europe (LARGE) that was founded in September 2019. The experiences from he implementation process and the findings from the scientific evaluation will be summarised and presented during the Zoominar. 3. Results and ConclusionWork on LAC has been started in 17 countries as Denmark, Germany, Slovenia, Lithuania, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, Brasil, etc. The overall results show that the LAC is feasible and very well accepted in many different countries, cultures and groups. It has been used for adults, children and groups as hospital employees and policemen. LAC are even possible as online course format that was tested during the COVID-19 pandemic. Scientific work on cultural issues and the effects of Last aid Courses are ongoing in a number of countries. In conclusion Last Aid Courses are feasible and well accepted by citizens in different countries. The courses can contribute to a public debate on death, dying and palliative care and may contribute to empower citizens to provide end-of-life care. Keywords: Palliative care, public palliative care education, end-of-life care, home death, compassionate communities, Last Aid Course Biography: Dr. med. Georg Bollig, PhD, MAS, DEAA is a physician and researcher. He is a specialist in anaesthesiology, emergency medicine and palliative medicine with scientific work in various fields. He works as consultant in palliative medicine at the Medical Center Sønderjylland in Sønderborg, South Jutland Hospital, Denmark. Georg is a clinical associate professor in palliative care at the University of Southern Denmark. He invented Last Aid Courses and is the leader of Last Aid International and the international Last Aid working group. At present he is working on research projects about ethics, telemedicine and the effects of Last Aid Courses. The presented research has been performed without external funding.Presenting author details that will be used for Certificates and Id cardsDr. Georg Bollig, PhD, MAS, DEAA; Clin. Assoc. Prof. in Palliative Care Palliative Care Team, Medical Department Sønderborg/Tønder, South Jutland Hospital, Sønderborg, Denmark b Palliative Care research group, Medical Research Unit, Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmarkc Last Aid International, Schleswig, GermanyEmail 1(Work): georg.bollig@rsyd.dkEmail 2(Personal): bollig.georg@gmx.deMobile: +49-17634747059Office Tel: +45-20168303ORCID iD: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0367-5295

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Stine Jacobsen; Bolette Beck; Charlotte Lindvang;
    Country: Denmark

    The Covid-19 pandemic has caused elevated levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress. Health care staff work daily in an environment where they are exposed to varying degrees of agitation and anxiety. This requires perseverance and a high degree of motivation and concentration. This study aimed to meet such diverse challenges by supporting citizens and staff through Covid-19 vaccine procedures in the Spring of 2021 through the utilization of background music. A curated playlist was developed in collaboration with health care and medical staff. Observation data was collected on three days with music and on three days without music with a total of 699 citizens and 39 employees participating. Analysis of data indicated how background music in connection with vaccination may have a positive effect on citizens and staff, especially in terms of citizens’experience of waiting time, of mood, of sound environment in the vaccination hall, as well as staff experience of contact with citizens and in cooperation with colleagues. Implementing curated playlists requires professional expertise to maximize potential benefits, as background music also can have negative effects. The involvement of staff is essential in addressing ethical aspects, as they need to be fully informed about background music and its appropriate usage.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Bagger, Christoffer;
    Country: Denmark

    Denne ph.d.-afhandling består af en indledende rammetekst (”kappe”) og fem forskningsartikler. Emnet for denne afhandling er grænsen og skæringspunktet mellem arbejde og ikke-arbejde, det personlige og det professionelle. Fokus i denne afhandling er på sociale medier, og mere specifikt enterprise sociale medier (ESM). Det empiriske emne er det ESM’et Workplace fra Meta (førWorkplace fra Facebook). Det forskningsspørgsmål, der ligger til grund for denne afhandling, er, hvordan brugen og fortolkningen af virksomhedens sociale medier komplicerer grænsen mellem det personlige og det professionelle, eller arbejde og ikke-arbejde.”Kappen” består af en kort ouverture og fem kapitler. I ouverturen antyder jegafhandlingens temaer gennem analysen af en personlig anekdote. I det første egentlige kapitel introducerer jeg problemområdet (grænsen mellem arbejde og ikke-arbejde og den rolle medier har i at forme denne grænse), forskningscasen (Workplace from Meta) og forskningsspørgsmålene. I andet kapitel giver jeg et overblik over både arbejde og sociale medier som kontekster for sig selv. I samme kapitel skitserer jeg, hvordan den hidtil gensidige mangel på interesse mellem medievidenskab og studier af arbejdslivet efterlader virksomheders sociale medier i et mellemområde mellem discipliner. I det tredje kapitel skitserer jeg de forskningsmetoder, der ligger til grund for de empiriskeforskningsartikler i dette projekt. Denne metode er inspireret af mediereceptionsstudier og søger at forstå, hvordan et udvalg af empiriske brugere (n=28) fortolker og bruger Workplace from Meta gennem kvalitative interviews. I det fjerde kapitel af rammeteksten diskuterer jeg resultaterne af dette forskningsprojekt og fremhæver, hvordan Workplace from Meta indtager et mellemrum mellem arbejde og ikke-arbejde, idet det er et medie for den professionelle kontekst, som er stærkt afhængig af fortrolighed. med sociale medier fra det personlige liv. Jeg afslutter dette kapitel med at foreslå, hvordandette skal informere fremtidig forskning. I femte og sidste kapitel opsummerer jeg konklusionerne af det overordnede forskningsprojekt.I den første forskningsartikel, med titlen "Social Media and Work: A Framework of Eight Intersections" (udgivet i International Journal of Communication) præsenterer jeg en gennemgang af områder i den eksisterende forskning, hvor sociale medier og arbejde overlapper. Efter at have afgrænset de to begreber "sociale medier" og "arbejde", skitserer jeg 8 konceptualiseringer, derbeskriver forskellige typer af skæringspunkter mellem disse to domæner: (1) sociale medier før arbejde, (2) sociale medier i stedet for arbejde, (3) sociale medier til arbejdsformål, (4) sociale medier om arbejde, (5) sociale medier som arbejde, (6) sociale medier under arbejde, (7) arbejde for sociale medierog (8) sociale medier efter arbejde. Jeg fortsætter med at diskutere, hvordan disse forskellige konceptualiseringer kan give anledning til (empiriske) forskelle i, hvordan individer oplever sociale medier og arbejder, og hvordan de to temaer giver forskellige analytiske fokuspunkter. Jeg slutter af med en konklusion om, hvordan forskning bør sensibiliseres over for en verden af post-sociale medier.I den anden forskningsartikel, med titlen "Digital Disconnection Research in Review: What, How and Who?" (Sendt til fagfællebedømmelse), gennemgår jeg hvor modreaktionen mod digitale medier har manifesteret sig i hverdagens praksis med digital afkobling (”digital disconnection”) eller bevidst ikke-brug af medier. Denne artikel søger at skabe et overblik over det sidste årti afempirisk afbrydelsesforskning og spore både dens overordnede tendenser og dens grænser. Dette sker gennem en analyse af 346 empiriske undersøgelser om digital afkobling. I denne artikels formål er forskning om digital afkobling defineret af en forskningsetos, der ikke ser handlingen med ikke-brug afmedier eller begrænset mediebrug som noget, der skal afhjælpes. I gennemgangen har forskningens typiske interesse været at studere relativt unge og individualiserede agenters afbrydelse af sociale medier, en afkobling som ofte er midlertidig eller delvis. Derfor overvejer artiklens diskussionsdel muligheden for, at åbenheden i digitale afkoblingsstudier kan strække sig yderligere, med særlig vægt på strukturer og sammenhænge, hvor afbrydelse ikke kun kan problematiseres af imperativerne om "altid på" kommunikation, specifikt i arbejdslivet.I den tredje forskningsartikel, med titlen "Professional, Transmedia Selves: Finding a Place for Enterprise Social Media" (indsendt til fagfællebedømmelse), antager jeg et udvidet syn på transmedieteori for at argumentere for, hvordan enterprise sociale medier (ESM), og især Workplace from Meta, faciliterer en mulighed for digital selvpræsentation. Argumentet er, at almindelige brugerenu er castet i rollen som transmedieproducenter, som skal finde ud af, hvilket unikt bidrag ESM kan give. Kapitlet fortsætter derefter med at skitsere tre individuelle casestudier af, hvordan integrationen af ESM’et Workplace fra Facebook kan udvikle sig. De forskellige cases illustrerer, hvordan overvejelserom både selvpromovering, medborgerskab på arbejdspladsen eller brug af ESM's legende funktioner både kan tilskynde til brug og i sidste ende marginalisere mediet i arbejderens personlige transmedieøkologi.I den fjerde forskningsartikel, med titlen "Overcoming Forced Disconnection:Disentangling the Professional and the Personal in Pandemic Times" (udgivet i antologien Reckoning with Social Media, red. Aleena Chia, Ana Jorge og Tero Karppi), medforfattet med Stine Lomborg , vender jeg mig imod spørgsmålet om, hvilken rolle Workplace spiller, når arbejdspladsen forsvinder. Ved at analysere de interviews, der blev gennemført under det første højdepunkt af COVID-19 pandemien, undersøger vi, hvilken rolle Workplace menes at spille under de på det tidspunkt ekstraordinære omstændigheder, som nedlukningen medførte. Her tyder beviserne på, at Workplaces fatiske kommunikative muligheder var sekundære i forhold til mere "levende" kommunikationsformer.Derudover repræsenterede COVID-19-lockdowns et tydeligt eksempel på arbejde, der migrerede ind i domænet af de personlige, potentielt eroderende tidsmæssige, rumlige og sociale grænser undervejs. Under disse mstændigheder var Workplace ikke blot et medie, der var "vandret" fra det personlige tildet professionelle liv. Det professionelle liv var nu uundgåeligt kastet sig ind i det personlige. Ud over at give flere eksempler på forhandlingerne om, hvilken form for kommunikation Workplace skal fremme, illustrerer denne artikel også vanskeligheden ved at stole på dette medie for fællesskab på arbejdspladsen, især under omstændigheder, hvor arbejdslivet blev særligt afhængig af digitale medier. I den femte og sidste forskningsartikel med titlen " An organisational cultivation of digital resignation? Enterprise social media, privacy, and autonomy” (udgivet i Nordicom Review 42(s4)), diskuterer jeg, hvordan enterprise sociale medier (ESM) stort set er blevet ignoreret i diskussioner om dataficeringspraksisser på sociale medieplatforme. Jeg præsenterer et første skridt i retning af at udfyldedette forskningshul. Mit forskningsspørgsmål i denne artikel vedrører, hvordan medarbejdere i virksomheder, der bruger ESM’et Workplace fra Facebook, føler, at implementeringen af denne særlige platform relaterer sig til deres potentielle kampe for digitalt privatliv og segmentering af arbejdsliv. Metodisk udforsker jeg dette gennem en kvalitativ interviewundersøgelse af 21 danske vidensarbejdere i forskellige organisationer, der anvender Workplace from Meta. Artiklens centrale analytiske forslag er, at interviewpersonerne udtrykker en "digital resignation" over for implementeringen af ESM. I modsætning til tidligere diskussioner kan denne fratræden ikke kun opfattes som "virksomhedsdyrket"af tredjeparter, men skal også betragtes som "organisatorisk dyrket" af de organisationer, folk arbejder for. Undersøgelsen foreslår, at dataficerings-orienterede mediestudier bør overveje organisatoriske sammenhænge.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Algayres, Muriel Gaelle; Timcenko, Olga; Triantafyllou, Evangelia;
    Country: Denmark

    Purpose – This study presents the development and implementation of a qualitative observation tool for in-class observation of courses employing game-based learning (GBL), and playful learning situations.Methodology – The design of the observation model exploits a literature review of classroom observation models, of cognitive psychology motivation scales, and of GBL evaluation models. It integrates relevant elements from these domains to offer an observation model for GBL implementation. In this model, in-class observations are coded and analysed for GBL effectiveness and potential to support intrinsic motivation in students. The model was then used in two courses using different forms of GBL (one digital cooperative multiplayer game, one analog board game). Observations were coded using NVivo and distributed according to type of motivation and type of motivated learning tasks. Due to Covid19 restrictions and the difficulties of finding in-person classes, only two courses were examined using the model.Findings – the model appeared efficient in both observational situations, and the coding confirmed previous studies to the potential of GBL to sustain students’ intrinsic motivation. The observations also showed that preparedness of students to the specific contents of the game reduced risk of amotivation and disengagement in students.Practical implication – The study allows us to reflect on best practices for GBL implementation and evaluation and how better understanding of in-class interactions during playful learning could enable educators and teachers to make better informed choices to implementing GBL.Interest – While there are many templates for classroom observation and GBL evaluation, there is a lack of dedicated observation models, that offer clear guidelines for qualitative data gathering in live, in-person classroom situations. This study aims at providing a specific tool to that purpose.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Donovan, Maria Margaret O;
    Publisher: Center for Undervisningsudvikling og Digitale Medier, Aarhus Universitet
    Country: Denmark

    An extended brief overviewing a bread swath of responses from higher educational institutions worldwide, to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Chiara Crovini; Stefan Schaper; Lorenzo Simoni;
    Country: Denmark

    PurposeThis article lays out some conceptual considerations of how dynamic accountability and risk reporting practices could be tailored during and after a global pandemic.Design/methodology/approachThis conceptual paper seeks to foster the debate on the crucial role of risk reporting considering the impact and uncertainty caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and stakeholder information needs in this context. The authors draw upon neo-Durkheimian institutional and legitimacy theories and elements of the accounting and risk management literature to discuss the challenges that the pandemic poses to risk recognition and assessment and the subsequent disclosure decision of risk information.FindingsRisk reporting has its roots in risk recognition and assessment. To live up to their accountability in these times of uncertainty, organisations need to address their stakeholders' new and changing information needs. Ad hoc disclosures and linking risk management and reporting to their business models (BM) would improve the risk recognition and assessment practices and the meaningfulness of the disclosed information. Hence, we provide some examples and discuss potential avenues to address these challenges and adapt risk reporting accordingly.Originality/valueThis conceptual paper contributes to the risk reporting and accountability research fields. Previous studies on communication during a crisis have focused on sustainability reporting. Thus, this study contributes to that literature by considering the role of risk reporting in times of an unexpected large-scale global crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, and by highlighting possibilities for moving risk reporting towards becoming more accountability based.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Lindsay, Euan; Møller Jeppesen, Mette; Vesterheden, Lisbeth Ramonn;
    Country: Denmark

    CONTEXTResponding to the COVID 19 pandemic has seen a sudden influx of digitalisation of engineering teaching through the move to emergency remote instruction. Universities must now choose between reverting back to traditional, largely face-to-face models of education, or moving forwards to more digital native approaches to delivery. Many of these digital native approaches have much in common with the work that is emerging in the field of microcredentials. While often originating in the co-curricular or continuing education space, many of the principles of microcredentials are potentially applicable to engineering degrees, but work in this space is held back by academics either not understanding or misunderstanding what microcredentials are and can be.PURPOSE OR GOALThis paper will explore a range of microcredentials, presenting a multidimensional framework of what microcredentials are and can be. It will identify the parts of this n-dimensional space that are relevant for emerging models of engineering education and explore their potential within engineering degrees. It will show that there is an emerging convergence between the objectives of microcredentials and traditional engineering education.APPROACH OR METHODOLOGY/METHODSThis paper will draw upon the literature and emerging standards in the field of microcredentials, as well as drawing from identified emerging trends in the design of engineering programs. It will also illustrate its key points with familiar but counter-intuitive examples of microcredentials.ACTUAL OR ANTICIPATED OUTCOMESThe paper will show that the field of microcredentials is much broader than most academics consider, but that current conceptualisations of microcredentials mean that only a very small part of that space is currently in use. The incipient move to digital native models of teaching will inherently lead to learning resources that align with some of the dimensions of the microcredential space. Combining the lessons of both fields will allow for a quicker, more effective and more sustainable transition to new models of engineering education in the future.CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS/SUMMARYNot all types of microcredentials are valuable for engineering education, but the ones that are valuable have the potential to become the dominant modes of delivery for technical content in the future. Providing clear frameworks for what microcredentials are, can be, and should be, will equip curriculum designers to move forward with digital native curricular that can leverage the advantages microcredentials have already demonstrated in co-curricular spaces.KEYWORDSMicrocredentials, digitisation, curriculum development CONTEXTResponding to the COVID 19 pandemic has seen a sudden influx of digitalisation of engineering teaching through the move to emergency remote instruction. Universities must now choose between reverting back to traditional, largely face-to-face models of education, or moving forwards to more digital native approaches to delivery. Many of these digital native approaches have much in common with the work that is emerging in the field of microcredentials. While often originating in the co-curricular or continuing education space, many of the principles of microcredentials are potentially applicable to engineering degrees, but work in this space is held back by academics either not understanding or misunderstanding what microcredentials are and can be.PURPOSE OR GOALThis paper will explore a range of microcredentials, presenting a multidimensional framework of what microcredentials are and can be. It will identify the parts of this n-dimensional space that are relevant for emerging models of engineering education and explore their potential within engineering degrees. It will show that there is an emerging convergence between the objectives of microcredentials and traditional engineering education.APPROACH OR METHODOLOGY/METHODSThis paper will draw upon the literature and emerging standards in the field of microcredentials, as well as drawing from identified emerging trends in the design of engineering programs. It will also illustrate its key points with familiar but counter-intuitive examples of microcredentials.ACTUAL OR ANTICIPATED OUTCOMESThe paper will show that the field of microcredentials is much broader than most academics consider, but that current conceptualisations of microcredentials mean that only a very small part of that space is currently in use. The incipient move to digital native models of teaching will inherently lead to learning resources that align with some of the dimensions of the microcredential space. Combining the lessons of both fields will allow for a quicker, more effective and more sustainable transition to new models of engineering education in the future.CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS/SUMMARYNot all types of microcredentials are valuable for engineering education, but the ones that are valuable have the potential to become the dominant modes of delivery for technical content in the future. Providing clear frameworks for what microcredentials are, can be, and should be, will equip curriculum designers to move forward with digital native curricular that can leverage the advantages microcredentials have already demonstrated in co-curricular spaces.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Bennedsen, Morten; Larsen, Birthe; Schmutte, Ian; Scur, Daniela;
    Country: Denmark

    We analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and government policies on firms' aid take-up, layoff and furlough decisions. We collect new survey data for 10,642 small, medium and large Danish firms, and match to government records of all aid-supported furloughed workers during the pandemic as well as administrative accounting data. This is the first representative sample of firms reporting the pandemic's impact on their revenue and labor choices, showing a steep decline in revenue and a strong reported effect of labor aid take-up on lower job separations. Relative to a normal year, 30 percent more firms have experienced revenue declines. Comparing firms' actual layoff and furlough decisions to their reported counterfactual decisions in the absence of aid, we estimate 81,000 fewer workers were laid off and 285,000 workers were furloughed. Our results suggest the aid policy was effective in preserving job matches at the start of the pandemic.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Honig, Timothy; McKinney, Cathy; Hannibal, Niels;
    Country: Denmark

    A multi-site randomized controlled feasibility study using a parallel design was conducted to determine the feasibility of the trial design and to provide preliminary evidence for whether the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (GIM) has an effect on depression, anxiety, stress, and mental wellbeing in persons with depression. Participants (N = 14) with depression were randomly allocated to either receive a series of 10 biweekly individual GIM sessions or a waitlist period followed a series of group GIM sessions. Participants completed the Inventory of Depressive Symptomotology–Self-Report; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales; and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale at pretest, midpoint, posttest, and 6-week followup. After onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, recruitment was terminated early and sessions were shifted to telehealth. Results indicate that the design is feasible with minor adjustments, and that the GIM condition had high safety, tolerability, and acceptability. Treatment outcome analyses are also reported.

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99 Research products, page 1 of 10
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Woodward, Ian; Banke, Signe;
    Country: Denmark

    On March 6, Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen declared that all gatherings over 1000 people would be banned until at least August 31, 2020. This announcement, and subsequent further reductions in gathering numbers, effectively ‘cancelled the summer’ of music festivals and much more in 2020. In this paper, based on a study of three music festivals in Denmark, we focus on the un-making of music festivals and their creative re-making across diverse social spaces and contexts by multiple agents in response to the trauma of cancellation. The absence of music festivals points actors to a Corona-induced social and cultural lack, an emblematic fact referring to the loss of spaces of intense sociality and connection which we interpret via literatures on compressed cultural trauma. Our field research shows that lack and loss are not the defining features of this event. Instead, a suite of strategies is enacted to protect and repair the festival ritual, its history, community, and commercial interests in the wake of Corona’s attack. The paper draws upon extensive ethnographic and qualitative research, including a 7-month ongoing longitudinal phase of interviews with audiences and various types of organisers associated with three cancelled Danish music festivals, as well as a 9-month ongoing large-scale longitudinal media and netnographic analysis. We examine how agents of festivalisation - festival organisers, musicians, audiences, local entrepreneurs, and festival spaces – have gone about remembering, commemorating, and mobilising festivals in the wake of Corona. We explore the ways festival agents use materials, spaces, symbolic resources and creative strategies to respond to the external threat of the virus and reflect on who these festival agents are acting for, what they end up making, and why. Specificities of responses differ depending on festival type, history and context. Further, responses are also relationally and temporo-spatially anchored to interpretation of wider Corona developments. However, we observe widespread evidence of creative re-materialisations of festival experiences, pointing to processes of remembrance, repair, and the ongoing constructive re-making of ritual festival experience in novel contexts.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Bollig, Georg;
    Country: Denmark

    1. Background and GoalsA major challenge for public palliative care is to support all people who want to die at home. Last Aid Courses (LAC) have been started in 2015 to educate citizens and to empower them to participate in end-of-life care. The main goals of the International Last Aid project were to establish an International Last Aid working group and to provide and evaluate public palliative care education for citizens. 2. MethodsBetween 2017 and 2019 an International Last Aid working group with representatives from different countries and national organisations from e.g. palliative care, health-services, and the church as cooperation partners has been established. The curriculum and contents of the International Last Aid course are revised every other year by the International Last Aid working group. Scientific evaluation of LAC is coordinated by the international Last Aid Research Group Europe (LARGE) that was founded in September 2019. The experiences from he implementation process and the findings from the scientific evaluation will be summarised and presented during the Zoominar. 3. Results and ConclusionWork on LAC has been started in 17 countries as Denmark, Germany, Slovenia, Lithuania, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, Brasil, etc. The overall results show that the LAC is feasible and very well accepted in many different countries, cultures and groups. It has been used for adults, children and groups as hospital employees and policemen. LAC are even possible as online course format that was tested during the COVID-19 pandemic. Scientific work on cultural issues and the effects of Last aid Courses are ongoing in a number of countries. In conclusion Last Aid Courses are feasible and well accepted by citizens in different countries. The courses can contribute to a public debate on death, dying and palliative care and may contribute to empower citizens to provide end-of-life care. Keywords: Palliative care, public palliative care education, end-of-life care, home death, compassionate communities, Last Aid Course Biography: Dr. med. Georg Bollig, PhD, MAS, DEAA is a physician and researcher. He is a specialist in anaesthesiology, emergency medicine and palliative medicine with scientific work in various fields. He works as consultant in palliative medicine at the Medical Center Sønderjylland in Sønderborg, South Jutland Hospital, Denmark. Georg is a clinical associate professor in palliative care at the University of Southern Denmark. He invented Last Aid Courses and is the leader of Last Aid International and the international Last Aid working group. At present he is working on research projects about ethics, telemedicine and the effects of Last Aid Courses. The presented research has been performed without external funding.Presenting author details that will be used for Certificates and Id cardsDr. Georg Bollig, PhD, MAS, DEAA; Clin. Assoc. Prof. in Palliative Care Palliative Care Team, Medical Department Sønderborg/Tønder, South Jutland Hospital, Sønderborg, Denmark b Palliative Care research group, Medical Research Unit, Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmarkc Last Aid International, Schleswig, GermanyEmail 1(Work): georg.bollig@rsyd.dkEmail 2(Personal): bollig.georg@gmx.deMobile: +49-17634747059Office Tel: +45-20168303ORCID iD: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0367-5295

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Stine Jacobsen; Bolette Beck; Charlotte Lindvang;
    Country: Denmark

    The Covid-19 pandemic has caused elevated levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress. Health care staff work daily in an environment where they are exposed to varying degrees of agitation and anxiety. This requires perseverance and a high degree of motivation and concentration. This study aimed to meet such diverse challenges by supporting citizens and staff through Covid-19 vaccine procedures in the Spring of 2021 through the utilization of background music. A curated playlist was developed in collaboration with health care and medical staff. Observation data was collected on three days with music and on three days without music with a total of 699 citizens and 39 employees participating. Analysis of data indicated how background music in connection with vaccination may have a positive effect on citizens and staff, especially in terms of citizens’experience of waiting time, of mood, of sound environment in the vaccination hall, as well as staff experience of contact with citizens and in cooperation with colleagues. Implementing curated playlists requires professional expertise to maximize potential benefits, as background music also can have negative effects. The involvement of staff is essential in addressing ethical aspects, as they need to be fully informed about background music and its appropriate usage.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Bagger, Christoffer;
    Country: Denmark

    Denne ph.d.-afhandling består af en indledende rammetekst (”kappe”) og fem forskningsartikler. Emnet for denne afhandling er grænsen og skæringspunktet mellem arbejde og ikke-arbejde, det personlige og det professionelle. Fokus i denne afhandling er på sociale medier, og mere specifikt enterprise sociale medier (ESM). Det empiriske emne er det ESM’et Workplace fra Meta (førWorkplace fra Facebook). Det forskningsspørgsmål, der ligger til grund for denne afhandling, er, hvordan brugen og fortolkningen af virksomhedens sociale medier komplicerer grænsen mellem det personlige og det professionelle, eller arbejde og ikke-arbejde.”Kappen” består af en kort ouverture og fem kapitler. I ouverturen antyder jegafhandlingens temaer gennem analysen af en personlig anekdote. I det første egentlige kapitel introducerer jeg problemområdet (grænsen mellem arbejde og ikke-arbejde og den rolle medier har i at forme denne grænse), forskningscasen (Workplace from Meta) og forskningsspørgsmålene. I andet kapitel giver jeg et overblik over både arbejde og sociale medier som kontekster for sig selv. I samme kapitel skitserer jeg, hvordan den hidtil gensidige mangel på interesse mellem medievidenskab og studier af arbejdslivet efterlader virksomheders sociale medier i et mellemområde mellem discipliner. I det tredje kapitel skitserer jeg de forskningsmetoder, der ligger til grund for de empiriskeforskningsartikler i dette projekt. Denne metode er inspireret af mediereceptionsstudier og søger at forstå, hvordan et udvalg af empiriske brugere (n=28) fortolker og bruger Workplace from Meta gennem kvalitative interviews. I det fjerde kapitel af rammeteksten diskuterer jeg resultaterne af dette forskningsprojekt og fremhæver, hvordan Workplace from Meta indtager et mellemrum mellem arbejde og ikke-arbejde, idet det er et medie for den professionelle kontekst, som er stærkt afhængig af fortrolighed. med sociale medier fra det personlige liv. Jeg afslutter dette kapitel med at foreslå, hvordandette skal informere fremtidig forskning. I femte og sidste kapitel opsummerer jeg konklusionerne af det overordnede forskningsprojekt.I den første forskningsartikel, med titlen "Social Media and Work: A Framework of Eight Intersections" (udgivet i International Journal of Communication) præsenterer jeg en gennemgang af områder i den eksisterende forskning, hvor sociale medier og arbejde overlapper. Efter at have afgrænset de to begreber "sociale medier" og "arbejde", skitserer jeg 8 konceptualiseringer, derbeskriver forskellige typer af skæringspunkter mellem disse to domæner: (1) sociale medier før arbejde, (2) sociale medier i stedet for arbejde, (3) sociale medier til arbejdsformål, (4) sociale medier om arbejde, (5) sociale medier som arbejde, (6) sociale medier under arbejde, (7) arbejde for sociale medierog (8) sociale medier efter arbejde. Jeg fortsætter med at diskutere, hvordan disse forskellige konceptualiseringer kan give anledning til (empiriske) forskelle i, hvordan individer oplever sociale medier og arbejder, og hvordan de to temaer giver forskellige analytiske fokuspunkter. Jeg slutter af med en konklusion om, hvordan forskning bør sensibiliseres over for en verden af post-sociale medier.I den anden forskningsartikel, med titlen "Digital Disconnection Research in Review: What, How and Who?" (Sendt til fagfællebedømmelse), gennemgår jeg hvor modreaktionen mod digitale medier har manifesteret sig i hverdagens praksis med digital afkobling (”digital disconnection”) eller bevidst ikke-brug af medier. Denne artikel søger at skabe et overblik over det sidste årti afempirisk afbrydelsesforskning og spore både dens overordnede tendenser og dens grænser. Dette sker gennem en analyse af 346 empiriske undersøgelser om digital afkobling. I denne artikels formål er forskning om digital afkobling defineret af en forskningsetos, der ikke ser handlingen med ikke-brug afmedier eller begrænset mediebrug som noget, der skal afhjælpes. I gennemgangen har forskningens typiske interesse været at studere relativt unge og individualiserede agenters afbrydelse af sociale medier, en afkobling som ofte er midlertidig eller delvis. Derfor overvejer artiklens diskussionsdel muligheden for, at åbenheden i digitale afkoblingsstudier kan strække sig yderligere, med særlig vægt på strukturer og sammenhænge, hvor afbrydelse ikke kun kan problematiseres af imperativerne om "altid på" kommunikation, specifikt i arbejdslivet.I den tredje forskningsartikel, med titlen "Professional, Transmedia Selves: Finding a Place for Enterprise Social Media" (indsendt til fagfællebedømmelse), antager jeg et udvidet syn på transmedieteori for at argumentere for, hvordan enterprise sociale medier (ESM), og især Workplace from Meta, faciliterer en mulighed for digital selvpræsentation. Argumentet er, at almindelige brugerenu er castet i rollen som transmedieproducenter, som skal finde ud af, hvilket unikt bidrag ESM kan give. Kapitlet fortsætter derefter med at skitsere tre individuelle casestudier af, hvordan integrationen af ESM’et Workplace fra Facebook kan udvikle sig. De forskellige cases illustrerer, hvordan overvejelserom både selvpromovering, medborgerskab på arbejdspladsen eller brug af ESM's legende funktioner både kan tilskynde til brug og i sidste ende marginalisere mediet i arbejderens personlige transmedieøkologi.I den fjerde forskningsartikel, med titlen "Overcoming Forced Disconnection:Disentangling the Professional and the Personal in Pandemic Times" (udgivet i antologien Reckoning with Social Media, red. Aleena Chia, Ana Jorge og Tero Karppi), medforfattet med Stine Lomborg , vender jeg mig imod spørgsmålet om, hvilken rolle Workplace spiller, når arbejdspladsen forsvinder. Ved at analysere de interviews, der blev gennemført under det første højdepunkt af COVID-19 pandemien, undersøger vi, hvilken rolle Workplace menes at spille under de på det tidspunkt ekstraordinære omstændigheder, som nedlukningen medførte. Her tyder beviserne på, at Workplaces fatiske kommunikative muligheder var sekundære i forhold til mere "levende" kommunikationsformer.Derudover repræsenterede COVID-19-lockdowns et tydeligt eksempel på arbejde, der migrerede ind i domænet af de personlige, potentielt eroderende tidsmæssige, rumlige og sociale grænser undervejs. Under disse mstændigheder var Workplace ikke blot et medie, der var "vandret" fra det personlige tildet professionelle liv. Det professionelle liv var nu uundgåeligt kastet sig ind i det personlige. Ud over at give flere eksempler på forhandlingerne om, hvilken form for kommunikation Workplace skal fremme, illustrerer denne artikel også vanskeligheden ved at stole på dette medie for fællesskab på arbejdspladsen, især under omstændigheder, hvor arbejdslivet blev særligt afhængig af digitale medier. I den femte og sidste forskningsartikel med titlen " An organisational cultivation of digital resignation? Enterprise social media, privacy, and autonomy” (udgivet i Nordicom Review 42(s4)), diskuterer jeg, hvordan enterprise sociale medier (ESM) stort set er blevet ignoreret i diskussioner om dataficeringspraksisser på sociale medieplatforme. Jeg præsenterer et første skridt i retning af at udfyldedette forskningshul. Mit forskningsspørgsmål i denne artikel vedrører, hvordan medarbejdere i virksomheder, der bruger ESM’et Workplace fra Facebook, føler, at implementeringen af denne særlige platform relaterer sig til deres potentielle kampe for digitalt privatliv og segmentering af arbejdsliv. Metodisk udforsker jeg dette gennem en kvalitativ interviewundersøgelse af 21 danske vidensarbejdere i forskellige organisationer, der anvender Workplace from Meta. Artiklens centrale analytiske forslag er, at interviewpersonerne udtrykker en "digital resignation" over for implementeringen af ESM. I modsætning til tidligere diskussioner kan denne fratræden ikke kun opfattes som "virksomhedsdyrket"af tredjeparter, men skal også betragtes som "organisatorisk dyrket" af de organisationer, folk arbejder for. Undersøgelsen foreslår, at dataficerings-orienterede mediestudier bør overveje organisatoriske sammenhænge.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Algayres, Muriel Gaelle; Timcenko, Olga; Triantafyllou, Evangelia;
    Country: Denmark

    Purpose – This study presents the development and implementation of a qualitative observation tool for in-class observation of courses employing game-based learning (GBL), and playful learning situations.Methodology – The design of the observation model exploits a literature review of classroom observation models, of cognitive psychology motivation scales, and of GBL evaluation models. It integrates relevant elements from these domains to offer an observation model for GBL implementation. In this model, in-class observations are coded and analysed for GBL effectiveness and potential to support intrinsic motivation in students. The model was then used in two courses using different forms of GBL (one digital cooperative multiplayer game, one analog board game). Observations were coded using NVivo and distributed according to type of motivation and type of motivated learning tasks. Due to Covid19 restrictions and the difficulties of finding in-person classes, only two courses were examined using the model.Findings – the model appeared efficient in both observational situations, and the coding confirmed previous studies to the potential of GBL to sustain students’ intrinsic motivation. The observations also showed that preparedness of students to the specific contents of the game reduced risk of amotivation and disengagement in students.Practical implication – The study allows us to reflect on best practices for GBL implementation and evaluation and how better understanding of in-class interactions during playful learning could enable educators and teachers to make better informed choices to implementing GBL.Interest – While there are many templates for classroom observation and GBL evaluation, there is a lack of dedicated observation models, that offer clear guidelines for qualitative data gathering in live, in-person classroom situations. This study aims at providing a specific tool to that purpose.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Donovan, Maria Margaret O;
    Publisher: Center for Undervisningsudvikling og Digitale Medier, Aarhus Universitet
    Country: Denmark

    An extended brief overviewing a bread swath of responses from higher educational institutions worldwide, to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Chiara Crovini; Stefan Schaper; Lorenzo Simoni;
    Country: Denmark

    PurposeThis article lays out some conceptual considerations of how dynamic accountability and risk reporting practices could be tailored during and after a global pandemic.Design/methodology/approachThis conceptual paper seeks to foster the debate on the crucial role of risk reporting considering the impact and uncertainty caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and stakeholder information needs in this context. The authors draw upon neo-Durkheimian institutional and legitimacy theories and elements of the accounting and risk management literature to discuss the challenges that the pandemic poses to risk recognition and assessment and the subsequent disclosure decision of risk information.FindingsRisk reporting has its roots in risk recognition and assessment. To live up to their accountability in these times of uncertainty, organisations need to address their stakeholders' new and changing information needs. Ad hoc disclosures and linking risk management and reporting to their business models (BM) would improve the risk recognition and assessment practices and the meaningfulness of the disclosed information. Hence, we provide some examples and discuss potential avenues to address these challenges and adapt risk reporting accordingly.Originality/valueThis conceptual paper contributes to the risk reporting and accountability research fields. Previous studies on communication during a crisis have focused on sustainability reporting. Thus, this study contributes to that literature by considering the role of risk reporting in times of an unexpected large-scale global crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, and by highlighting possibilities for moving risk reporting towards becoming more accountability based.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Lindsay, Euan; Møller Jeppesen, Mette; Vesterheden, Lisbeth Ramonn;
    Country: Denmark

    CONTEXTResponding to the COVID 19 pandemic has seen a sudden influx of digitalisation of engineering teaching through the move to emergency remote instruction. Universities must now choose between reverting back to traditional, largely face-to-face models of education, or moving forwards to more digital native approaches to delivery. Many of these digital native approaches have much in common with the work that is emerging in the field of microcredentials. While often originating in the co-curricular or continuing education space, many of the principles of microcredentials are potentially applicable to engineering degrees, but work in this space is held back by academics either not understanding or misunderstanding what microcredentials are and can be.PURPOSE OR GOALThis paper will explore a range of microcredentials, presenting a multidimensional framework of what microcredentials are and can be. It will identify the parts of this n-dimensional space that are relevant for emerging models of engineering education and explore their potential within engineering degrees. It will show that there is an emerging convergence between the objectives of microcredentials and traditional engineering education.APPROACH OR METHODOLOGY/METHODSThis paper will draw upon the literature and emerging standards in the field of microcredentials, as well as drawing from identified emerging trends in the design of engineering programs. It will also illustrate its key points with familiar but counter-intuitive examples of microcredentials.ACTUAL OR ANTICIPATED OUTCOMESThe paper will show that the field of microcredentials is much broader than most academics consider, but that current conceptualisations of microcredentials mean that only a very small part of that space is currently in use. The incipient move to digital native models of teaching will inherently lead to learning resources that align with some of the dimensions of the microcredential space. Combining the lessons of both fields will allow for a quicker, more effective and more sustainable transition to new models of engineering education in the future.CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS/SUMMARYNot all types of microcredentials are valuable for engineering education, but the ones that are valuable have the potential to become the dominant modes of delivery for technical content in the future. Providing clear frameworks for what microcredentials are, can be, and should be, will equip curriculum designers to move forward with digital native curricular that can leverage the advantages microcredentials have already demonstrated in co-curricular spaces.KEYWORDSMicrocredentials, digitisation, curriculum development CONTEXTResponding to the COVID 19 pandemic has seen a sudden influx of digitalisation of engineering teaching through the move to emergency remote instruction. Universities must now choose between reverting back to traditional, largely face-to-face models of education, or moving forwards to more digital native approaches to delivery. Many of these digital native approaches have much in common with the work that is emerging in the field of microcredentials. While often originating in the co-curricular or continuing education space, many of the principles of microcredentials are potentially applicable to engineering degrees, but work in this space is held back by academics either not understanding or misunderstanding what microcredentials are and can be.PURPOSE OR GOALThis paper will explore a range of microcredentials, presenting a multidimensional framework of what microcredentials are and can be. It will identify the parts of this n-dimensional space that are relevant for emerging models of engineering education and explore their potential within engineering degrees. It will show that there is an emerging convergence between the objectives of microcredentials and traditional engineering education.APPROACH OR METHODOLOGY/METHODSThis paper will draw upon the literature and emerging standards in the field of microcredentials, as well as drawing from identified emerging trends in the design of engineering programs. It will also illustrate its key points with familiar but counter-intuitive examples of microcredentials.ACTUAL OR ANTICIPATED OUTCOMESThe paper will show that the field of microcredentials is much broader than most academics consider, but that current conceptualisations of microcredentials mean that only a very small part of that space is currently in use. The incipient move to digital native models of teaching will inherently lead to learning resources that align with some of the dimensions of the microcredential space. Combining the lessons of both fields will allow for a quicker, more effective and more sustainable transition to new models of engineering education in the future.CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS/SUMMARYNot all types of microcredentials are valuable for engineering education, but the ones that are valuable have the potential to become the dominant modes of delivery for technical content in the future. Providing clear frameworks for what microcredentials are, can be, and should be, will equip curriculum designers to move forward with digital native curricular that can leverage the advantages microcredentials have already demonstrated in co-curricular spaces.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Bennedsen, Morten; Larsen, Birthe; Schmutte, Ian; Scur, Daniela;
    Country: Denmark

    We analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and government policies on firms' aid take-up, layoff and furlough decisions. We collect new survey data for 10,642 small, medium and large Danish firms, and match to government records of all aid-supported furloughed workers during the pandemic as well as administrative accounting data. This is the first representative sample of firms reporting the pandemic's impact on their revenue and labor choices, showing a steep decline in revenue and a strong reported effect of labor aid take-up on lower job separations. Relative to a normal year, 30 percent more firms have experienced revenue declines. Comparing firms' actual layoff and furlough decisions to their reported counterfactual decisions in the absence of aid, we estimate 81,000 fewer workers were laid off and 285,000 workers were furloughed. Our results suggest the aid policy was effective in preserving job matches at the start of the pandemic.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Honig, Timothy; McKinney, Cathy; Hannibal, Niels;
    Country: Denmark

    A multi-site randomized controlled feasibility study using a parallel design was conducted to determine the feasibility of the trial design and to provide preliminary evidence for whether the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (GIM) has an effect on depression, anxiety, stress, and mental wellbeing in persons with depression. Participants (N = 14) with depression were randomly allocated to either receive a series of 10 biweekly individual GIM sessions or a waitlist period followed a series of group GIM sessions. Participants completed the Inventory of Depressive Symptomotology–Self-Report; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales; and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale at pretest, midpoint, posttest, and 6-week followup. After onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, recruitment was terminated early and sessions were shifted to telehealth. Results indicate that the design is feasible with minor adjustments, and that the GIM condition had high safety, tolerability, and acceptability. Treatment outcome analyses are also reported.