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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Giovanni Spitale;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The COVID-19 pandemic generated (and keeps generating) a huge corpus of news articles, easily retrievable in Factiva with very targeted queries. This dataset, generated with an ad-hoc parser and NLP pipeline, analyzes the frequency of lemmas and named entities in news articles (in German, French, Italian and English ) regarding Switzerland and COVID-19. The analysis of large bodies of grey literature via text mining and computational linguistics is an increasingly frequent approach to understand the large-scale trends of specific topics. We used Factiva, a news monitoring and search engine developed and owned by Dow Jones, to gather and download all the news articles published between January 2020 and May 2021 on Covid-19 and Switzerland. Due to Factiva's copyright policy, it is not possible to share the original dataset with the exports of the articles' text; however, we can share the results of our work on the corpus. All the information relevant to reproduce the results is provided. Factiva allows a very granular definition of the queries, and moreover has access to full text articles published by the major media outlet of the world. The query has been defined as follows (syntax in bold, explanation in italics): ((coronavirus or Wuhan virus or corvid19 or corvid 19 or covid19 or covid 19 or ncov or novel coronavirus or sars) and (atleast3 coronavirus or atleast3 wuhan or atleast3 corvid* or atleast3 covid* or atleast3 ncov or atleast3 novel or atleast3 corona*)) Keywords for covid19; must appear at least 3 times in the text and ns=(gsars or gout) Subject is “novel coronaviruses” or “outbreaks and epidemics” and “general news” and la=X Language is X (DE, FR, IT, EN) and rst=tmnb Restrict to TMNB (major news and business publications) and wc>300 At least 300 words and date from 20191001 to 20212005 Date interval and re=SWITZ Region is Switzerland It is important to specify some details that characterize the query. The query is not limited to articles published by Swiss media, but to articles regarding Switzerland. The reason is simple: a Swiss user googling for “Schweiz Coronavirus” or for “Coronavirus Ticino” can easily find and read articles published by foreign media outlets (namely, German or Italian) on that topic. If the objective is capturing and describing the information trends to which people are exposed, this approach makes much more sense than limiting the analysis to articles published by Swiss media. Factiva’s field “NS” is a descriptor for the content of the article. “gsars” is defined in Factiva’s documentation as “All news on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome”, and “gout” as “The widespread occurrence of an infectious disease affecting many people or animals in a given population at the same time”; however, the way these descriptors are assigned to articles is not specified in the documentation. Finally, the query has been restricted to major news and business publications of at least 300 words. Duplicate check is performed by Factiva. Given the incredibly large amount of articles published on COVID-19, this (absolutely arbitrary) restriction allows retrieving a corpus that is both meaningful and manageable. metadata.xlsx contains information about the articles retrieved (strategy, amount) This work is part of the PubliCo research project. This work is part of the PubliCo research project, supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF). Project no. 31CA30_195905

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    We have before us the sixth issue of INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology. This is the second issue in a row dedicated to the global crisis caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. After the overwhelming response from all over the world to the call for papers and provocative inspections that ensued, here we wanted to discuss the ways in which technology shapes and enables work in the areas of music, arts, humanities, and the education process, this time inviting our collaborators to discuss the shortcomings and struggles of the working processes in these fields. The main theme, “Music, Art and Humanities in the Time of Global Crisis”, expanded from the Main Theme section into the interviews as well.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973, then between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also available). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis.This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.New reweighting policyFollowing the new reweighting policy ONS has reviewed the latest population estimates made available during 2019 and have decided not to carry out a 2019 LFS and APS reweighting exercise. Therefore, the next reweighting exercise will take place in 2020. These will incorporate the 2019 Sub-National Population Projection data (published in May 2020) and 2019 Mid-Year Estimates (published in June 2020). It is expected that reweighted Labour Market aggregates and microdata will be published towards the end of 2020/early 2021.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: Secure Access datasets (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to Country of Birth and Nationality variables, 2017:Following a disclosure review in 2016 by the ONS Data Access Team, changes have been made to the LFS Country of Birth and Nationality variables from the July-September 2017 quarter. Four new variables have been created and four variables removed. The new groupings are consistent with those published by the Migration Statistics Unit and so should facilitate users to carry out required analysis of Country of Birth and Nationality. The variables added are: CRYOX7_EUL_Main, CRYOX7_EUL_Sub, NATOX7_EUL_Main and NATOX7_EUL_Sub. The variables removed are: CRYO7, CRYOX7, NATO7 and NATOX7.Variables DISEA and LNGLSTDataset A08 (Labour market status of disabled people) which ONS suspended due to an apparent discontinuity between April to June 2017 and July to September 2017 is now available. As a result of this apparent discontinuity and the inconclusive investigations at this stage, comparisons should be made with caution between April to June 2017 and subsequent time periods. However users should note that the estimates are not seasonally adjusted, so some of the change between quarters could be due to seasonality. Further recommendations on historical comparisons of the estimates will be given in November 2018 when ONS are due to publish estimates for July to September 2018. An ONS Methodology section article on Analysis of the discontinuity in the Labour Force Survey disability data: April to June 2017 to July to September 2017 has also been published. For any queries about Dataset A08 please email Labour.Market@ons.gov.uk ONS methodology reports on the Labour Force Survey, published 2019: A report on progress to assess potential bias in the LFS through a comparison against alternative data sources including proxy labour measures from administrative data: Exploring the use of external data to assess for observed bias in Labour Force Survey estimates: interim findings An update on Progress against the Labour Force Survey National Statistics Quality Review recommendationsLFS response to COVID-19Since April 2020, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata have been delivered to Government Departments and the wider research community through the ONS Secure Research Service and UK Data Service. The first additional microdata to be released covered the period February to April 2020, to coincide with Labour Market Statistical Bulletin publication on 16 June. Further guidance was also provided with the release of the February to April 2020 microdata. Please consult the documentation for full details. Users should note that within the additional COVID-19 quarters, the pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables are only produced once a quarter by ONS, and so are not available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. It is intended that the Casenop and Hserialp variables in the COVID-19 datasets will be updated at the release of the next standard calendar quarter, when the values for the missing cases will become available. Users should also note that the Income Weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-standard quarters, although the Person Weight (PWT) is included.Weighting methodology information, May 2021 Following advice from ONS Labour Market Division regarding concerns over the estimates for Ethnicity, COB, Nationality and Disability from the LFS and APS, users are advised that levels and changes in levels should be used with caution. Rates published from the LFS and APS remain robust. This will particularly affect estimates for country of birth, nationality, ethnicity and disability, so any analysis using levels for these topics should be suppressed.LFS and APS responses are weighted to official 2018-based population projections on demographic trends that pre-date the coronavirus pandemic. In the Labour Market Division's Coronavirus and the impact on payroll employment article, analysis of the population totals currently used in the LFS weighting process is explained, and the intention to continue to make adjustments when appropriate.The document Labour Force Survey weighting methodology details the reweighting methodology and includes release dates for reweighted estimates. Latest edition informationFor the second edition (June 2022), 2022 weighting variable PWT22 was added to the study, and the 2020 weight removed. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973, then between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also available). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis.This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.New reweighting policyFollowing the new reweighting policy ONS has reviewed the latest population estimates made available during 2019 and have decided not to carry out a 2019 LFS and APS reweighting exercise. Therefore, the next reweighting exercise will take place in 2020. These will incorporate the 2019 Sub-National Population Projection data (published in May 2020) and 2019 Mid-Year Estimates (published in June 2020). It is expected that reweighted Labour Market aggregates and microdata will be published towards the end of 2020/early 2021.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: Secure Access datasets (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to Country of Birth and Nationality variables, 2017:Following a disclosure review in 2016 by the ONS Data Access Team, changes have been made to the LFS Country of Birth and Nationality variables from the July-September 2017 quarter. Four new variables have been created and four variables removed. The new groupings are consistent with those published by the Migration Statistics Unit and so should facilitate users to carry out required analysis of Country of Birth and Nationality. The variables added are: CRYOX7_EUL_Main, CRYOX7_EUL_Sub, NATOX7_EUL_Main and NATOX7_EUL_Sub. The variables removed are: CRYO7, CRYOX7, NATO7 and NATOX7.Variables DISEA and LNGLSTDataset A08 (Labour market status of disabled people) which ONS suspended due to an apparent discontinuity between April to June 2017 and July to September 2017 is now available. As a result of this apparent discontinuity and the inconclusive investigations at this stage, comparisons should be made with caution between April to June 2017 and subsequent time periods. However users should note that the estimates are not seasonally adjusted, so some of the change between quarters could be due to seasonality. Further recommendations on historical comparisons of the estimates will be given in November 2018 when ONS are due to publish estimates for July to September 2018. An ONS Methodology section article on Analysis of the discontinuity in the Labour Force Survey disability data: April to June 2017 to July to September 2017 has also been published. For any queries about Dataset A08 please email Labour.Market@ons.gov.uk ONS methodology reports on the Labour Force Survey, published 2019: A report on progress to assess potential bias in the LFS through a comparison against alternative data sources including proxy labour measures from administrative data: Exploring the use of external data to assess for observed bias in Labour Force Survey estimates: interim findings An update on Progress against the Labour Force Survey National Statistics Quality Review recommendationsLFS response to COVID-19Since April 2020, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata have been delivered to Government Departments and the wider research community through the ONS Secure Research Service and UK Data Service. The first additional microdata to be released covered the period February to April 2020, to coincide with Labour Market Statistical Bulletin publication on 16 June. Further guidance was also provided with the release of the February to April 2020 microdata. Please consult the documentation for full details. Users should note that within the additional COVID-19 quarters, the pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables are only produced once a quarter by ONS, and so are not available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. It is intended that the Casenop and Hserialp variables in the COVID-19 datasets will be updated at the release of the next standard calendar quarter, when the values for the missing cases will become available. Users should also note that the Income Weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-standard quarters, although the Person Weight (PWT) is included.Weighting methodology information, May 2021 Following advice from ONS Labour Market Division regarding concerns over the estimates for Ethnicity, COB, Nationality and Disability from the LFS and APS, users are advised that levels and changes in levels should be used with caution. Rates published from the LFS and APS remain robust. This will particularly affect estimates for country of birth, nationality, ethnicity and disability, so any analysis using levels for these topics should be suppressed.LFS and APS responses are weighted to official 2018-based population projections on demographic trends that pre-date the coronavirus pandemic. In the Labour Market Division's Coronavirus and the impact on payroll employment article, analysis of the population totals currently used in the LFS weighting process is explained, and the intention to continue to make adjustments when appropriate.The document Labour Force Survey weighting methodology details the reweighting methodology and includes release dates for reweighted estimates. Latest edition informationFor the third edition (June 2022), 2022 weighting variable PWT22 was added to the study, and the 2020 weight removed. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973, then between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also available). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis.This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.New reweighting policyFollowing the new reweighting policy ONS has reviewed the latest population estimates made available during 2019 and have decided not to carry out a 2019 LFS and APS reweighting exercise. Therefore, the next reweighting exercise will take place in 2020. These will incorporate the 2019 Sub-National Population Projection data (published in May 2020) and 2019 Mid-Year Estimates (published in June 2020). It is expected that reweighted Labour Market aggregates and microdata will be published towards the end of 2020/early 2021.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: Secure Access datasets (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to Country of Birth and Nationality variables, 2017:Following a disclosure review in 2016 by the ONS Data Access Team, changes have been made to the LFS Country of Birth and Nationality variables from the July-September 2017 quarter. Four new variables have been created and four variables removed. The new groupings are consistent with those published by the Migration Statistics Unit and so should facilitate users to carry out required analysis of Country of Birth and Nationality. The variables added are: CRYOX7_EUL_Main, CRYOX7_EUL_Sub, NATOX7_EUL_Main and NATOX7_EUL_Sub. The variables removed are: CRYO7, CRYOX7, NATO7 and NATOX7.Variables DISEA and LNGLSTDataset A08 (Labour market status of disabled people) which ONS suspended due to an apparent discontinuity between April to June 2017 and July to September 2017 is now available. As a result of this apparent discontinuity and the inconclusive investigations at this stage, comparisons should be made with caution between April to June 2017 and subsequent time periods. However users should note that the estimates are not seasonally adjusted, so some of the change between quarters could be due to seasonality. Further recommendations on historical comparisons of the estimates will be given in November 2018 when ONS are due to publish estimates for July to September 2018. An ONS Methodology section article on Analysis of the discontinuity in the Labour Force Survey disability data: April to June 2017 to July to September 2017 has also been published. For any queries about Dataset A08 please email Labour.Market@ons.gov.uk ONS methodology reports on the Labour Force Survey, published 2019: A report on progress to assess potential bias in the LFS through a comparison against alternative data sources including proxy labour measures from administrative data: Exploring the use of external data to assess for observed bias in Labour Force Survey estimates: interim findings An update on Progress against the Labour Force Survey National Statistics Quality Review recommendationsLFS response to COVID-19Since April 2020, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata have been delivered to Government Departments and the wider research community through the ONS Secure Research Service and UK Data Service. The first additional microdata to be released covered the period February to April 2020, to coincide with Labour Market Statistical Bulletin publication on 16 June. Further guidance was also provided with the release of the February to April 2020 microdata. Please consult the documentation for full details. Users should note that within the additional COVID-19 quarters, the pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables are only produced once a quarter by ONS, and so are not available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. It is intended that the Casenop and Hserialp variables in the COVID-19 datasets will be updated at the release of the next standard calendar quarter, when the values for the missing cases will become available. Users should also note that the Income Weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-standard quarters, although the Person Weight (PWT) is included.Weighting methodology information, May 2021 Following advice from ONS Labour Market Division regarding concerns over the estimates for Ethnicity, COB, Nationality and Disability from the LFS and APS, users are advised that levels and changes in levels should be used with caution. Rates published from the LFS and APS remain robust. This will particularly affect estimates for country of birth, nationality, ethnicity and disability, so any analysis using levels for these topics should be suppressed.LFS and APS responses are weighted to official 2018-based population projections on demographic trends that pre-date the coronavirus pandemic. In the Labour Market Division's Coronavirus and the impact on payroll employment article, analysis of the population totals currently used in the LFS weighting process is explained, and the intention to continue to make adjustments when appropriate.The document Labour Force Survey weighting methodology details the reweighting methodology and includes release dates for reweighted estimates. Latest edition informationFor the fourth edition (June 2022), 2022 weighting variable PWT22 was added to the study, and the 2020 weight removed. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chatterjee, Avishek; Nardi, Cosimo; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe;

    Background: Searching through the COVID-19 research literature to gain actionable clinical insight is a formidable task, even for experts. The usefulness of this corpus in terms of improving patient care is tied to the ability to see the big picture that emerges when the studies are seen in conjunction rather than in isolation. When the answer to a search query requires linking together multiple pieces of information across documents, simple keyword searches are insufficient. To answer such complex information needs, an innovative artificial intelligence (AI) technology named a knowledge graph (KG) could prove to be effective. Methods: We conducted an exploratory literature review of KG applications in the context of COVID-19. The search term used was "covid-19 knowledge graph". In addition to PubMed, the first five pages of search results for Google Scholar and Google were considered for inclusion. Google Scholar was used to include non-peer-reviewed or non-indexed articles such as pre-prints and conference proceedings. Google was used to identify companies or consortiums active in this domain that have not published any literature, peer-reviewed or otherwise. Results: Our search yielded 34 results on PubMed and 50 results each on Google and Google Scholar. We found KGs being used for facilitating literature search, drug repurposing, clinical trial mapping, and risk factor analysis. Conclusions: Our synopses of these works make a compelling case for the utility of this nascent field of research.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973, then between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also available). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis.This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.New reweighting policyFollowing the new reweighting policy ONS has reviewed the latest population estimates made available during 2019 and have decided not to carry out a 2019 LFS and APS reweighting exercise. Therefore, the next reweighting exercise will take place in 2020. These will incorporate the 2019 Sub-National Population Projection data (published in May 2020) and 2019 Mid-Year Estimates (published in June 2020). It is expected that reweighted Labour Market aggregates and microdata will be published towards the end of 2020/early 2021.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: Secure Access datasets (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to Country of Birth and Nationality variables, 2017:Following a disclosure review in 2016 by the ONS Data Access Team, changes have been made to the LFS Country of Birth and Nationality variables from the July-September 2017 quarter. Four new variables have been created and four variables removed. The new groupings are consistent with those published by the Migration Statistics Unit and so should facilitate users to carry out required analysis of Country of Birth and Nationality. The variables added are: CRYOX7_EUL_Main, CRYOX7_EUL_Sub, NATOX7_EUL_Main and NATOX7_EUL_Sub. The variables removed are: CRYO7, CRYOX7, NATO7 and NATOX7.Variables DISEA and LNGLSTDataset A08 (Labour market status of disabled people) which ONS suspended due to an apparent discontinuity between April to June 2017 and July to September 2017 is now available. As a result of this apparent discontinuity and the inconclusive investigations at this stage, comparisons should be made with caution between April to June 2017 and subsequent time periods. However users should note that the estimates are not seasonally adjusted, so some of the change between quarters could be due to seasonality. Further recommendations on historical comparisons of the estimates will be given in November 2018 when ONS are due to publish estimates for July to September 2018. An ONS Methodology section article on Analysis of the discontinuity in the Labour Force Survey disability data: April to June 2017 to July to September 2017 has also been published. For any queries about Dataset A08 please email Labour.Market@ons.gov.uk ONS methodology reports on the Labour Force Survey, published 2019: A report on progress to assess potential bias in the LFS through a comparison against alternative data sources including proxy labour measures from administrative data: Exploring the use of external data to assess for observed bias in Labour Force Survey estimates: interim findings An update on Progress against the Labour Force Survey National Statistics Quality Review recommendationsLFS response to COVID-19Since April 2020, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata have been delivered to Government Departments and the wider research community through the ONS Secure Research Service and UK Data Service. The first additional microdata to be released covered the period February to April 2020, to coincide with Labour Market Statistical Bulletin publication on 16 June. Further guidance was also provided with the release of the February to April 2020 microdata. Please consult the documentation for full details. Users should note that within the additional COVID-19 quarters, the pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables are only produced once a quarter by ONS, and so are not available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. It is intended that the Casenop and Hserialp variables in the COVID-19 datasets will be updated at the release of the next standard calendar quarter, when the values for the missing cases will become available. Users should also note that the Income Weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-standard quarters, although the Person Weight (PWT) is included.Weighting methodology information, May 2021 Following advice from ONS Labour Market Division regarding concerns over the estimates for Ethnicity, COB, Nationality and Disability from the LFS and APS, users are advised that levels and changes in levels should be used with caution. Rates published from the LFS and APS remain robust. This will particularly affect estimates for country of birth, nationality, ethnicity and disability, so any analysis using levels for these topics should be suppressed.LFS and APS responses are weighted to official 2018-based population projections on demographic trends that pre-date the coronavirus pandemic. In the Labour Market Division's Coronavirus and the impact on payroll employment article, analysis of the population totals currently used in the LFS weighting process is explained, and the intention to continue to make adjustments when appropriate.The document Labour Force Survey weighting methodology details the reweighting methodology and includes release dates for reweighted estimates. Latest edition informationFor the third edition (June 2022), 2022 weighting variable PWT22 was added to the study, and the 2020 weight removed. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview

  • English
    Authors: 
    Department for Work and Pensions; NatCen Social Research;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Family Resources Survey (FRS) is a continuous survey that was launched in 1992 to meet the information requirements of Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) analysts. It collects information on a representative sample of private households in the United Kingdom (prior to 2002, it covered Great Britain only). The focus of the survey is on household incomes, and how much income comes from the many possible sources (such as individual earnings, individual pensions, state benefits and others such as investment income). FRS 2020-21 and the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemicThe coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the FRS 2020-21 in the following ways: Fieldwork operations for the FRS were rapidly changed in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the introduction of national lockdown restrictions. The established face-to-face interviewing approach employed on the FRS was suspended and replaced with telephone interviewing for the whole of the 2020-21 survey year. This change impacted both the size and composition of the achieved sample. This shift in mode of interview has been accompanied by a substantial reduction in the number of interviews achieved: just over 10,000 interviews were achieved this year, compared with 19,000 to 20,000 in a typical FRS year. It is also recognised that older, more affluent participants were over-sampled. The achieved sample was particularly small for April, and was more unbalanced across the year, with a total of 4,000 households representing the first 6 months of the survey year. While we made every effort to address additional biases identified (e.g. by altering our weighting regime), some residual bias remains. Please see the FRS 2020-21 Background Information and Methodology document for more information. The FRS team have published a technical report for the 2020-21 survey, which provides a full assessment of the impact of the pandemic on the statistics. In line with the Statistics Code of Practice, this is designed to assist users with interpreting the data and to aid transparency over decisions and data quality issues. The FRS team are seeking users' feedback on the 2020-21 FRS. Given the breadth of groups covered by the FRS data, it has not been possible for DWP statisticians to assess or validate every breakdown which is of interest to external researchers and users. Therefore, the FRS team are inviting users to let them know of any insights you may have relating to data quality or trends when analysing these data for your area of interest. This will help the FRS team as we begin to process and quality-assure the 2021-22 dataset. Please send any feedback directly to the FRS Team Inbox: team.frs@dwp.gov.uk Safe Room Access FRS data In addition to the standard End User Licence (EUL) version, Safe Room access datasets, containing unrounded data and additional variables, are also available for FRS from 2005/06 onwards - see SN 7196, where the extra contents are listed. The Safe Room version also includes secure access versions of the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) and Pensioners' Incomes (PI) datasets. The Safe Room access data are currently only available to UK HE/FE applicants and for access at the UK Data Archive's Safe Room at the University of Essex, Colchester. Prospective users of the Safe Room access version of the FRS/HBAI/PI will need to fulfil additional requirements beyond those associated with the EUL datasets. Full details of the application requirements are available from Guidance on applying for the Family Resources Survey: Secure Access. Further information about the FRS can be found on the gov.uk Family Resources Survey webpage.FRS, HBAI and PIThe FRS underpins the related Households Below Average Income (HBAI) dataset, which focuses on poverty in the UK, and the related Pensioners' Incomes (PI) dataset. The EUL versions of HBAI and PI are held under SNs 5828 and 8503 respectively. The secure access versions are held within the Safe Room FRS study under SN 7196 (see above). Main Topics: Household characteristics (family composition, tenure); COVID-19, housing costs including rent or details of mortgage; household bills including Council Tax, buildings and contents insurance, water and sewerage rates; receipt of state support from all state benefits, including Universal Credit and Tax Credits; educational level and grants and loans; children in education; care, both those receiving care and those caring for others; childcare; occupation, employment, self-employment and earnings/wage details; income tax payments and refunds; National Insurance contributions; earnings from odd jobs; health, restrictions on work, children's health, and disability or limiting long-standing illness; personal and occupational pension schemes; income from pensions and trusts, royalties and allowances, and other sources; children's earnings; interest and dividends from investments including National Savings products, stocks and shares; and total household assets. Multi-stage stratified random sample Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973, then between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also available). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis.This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.New reweighting policyFollowing the new reweighting policy ONS has reviewed the latest population estimates made available during 2019 and have decided not to carry out a 2019 LFS and APS reweighting exercise. Therefore, the next reweighting exercise will take place in 2020. These will incorporate the 2019 Sub-National Population Projection data (published in May 2020) and 2019 Mid-Year Estimates (published in June 2020). It is expected that reweighted Labour Market aggregates and microdata will be published towards the end of 2020/early 2021.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: Secure Access datasets (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to Country of Birth and Nationality variables, 2017:Following a disclosure review in 2016 by the ONS Data Access Team, changes have been made to the LFS Country of Birth and Nationality variables from the July-September 2017 quarter. Four new variables have been created and four variables removed. The new groupings are consistent with those published by the Migration Statistics Unit and so should facilitate users to carry out required analysis of Country of Birth and Nationality. The variables added are: CRYOX7_EUL_Main, CRYOX7_EUL_Sub, NATOX7_EUL_Main and NATOX7_EUL_Sub. The variables removed are: CRYO7, CRYOX7, NATO7 and NATOX7.Variables DISEA and LNGLSTDataset A08 (Labour market status of disabled people) which ONS suspended due to an apparent discontinuity between April to June 2017 and July to September 2017 is now available. As a result of this apparent discontinuity and the inconclusive investigations at this stage, comparisons should be made with caution between April to June 2017 and subsequent time periods. However users should note that the estimates are not seasonally adjusted, so some of the change between quarters could be due to seasonality. Further recommendations on historical comparisons of the estimates will be given in November 2018 when ONS are due to publish estimates for July to September 2018. An ONS Methodology section article on Analysis of the discontinuity in the Labour Force Survey disability data: April to June 2017 to July to September 2017 has also been published. For any queries about Dataset A08 please email Labour.Market@ons.gov.uk ONS methodology reports on the Labour Force Survey, published 2019: A report on progress to assess potential bias in the LFS through a comparison against alternative data sources including proxy labour measures from administrative data: Exploring the use of external data to assess for observed bias in Labour Force Survey estimates: interim findings An update on Progress against the Labour Force Survey National Statistics Quality Review recommendationsLFS response to COVID-19Since April 2020, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata have been delivered to Government Departments and the wider research community through the ONS Secure Research Service and UK Data Service. The first additional microdata to be released covered the period February to April 2020, to coincide with Labour Market Statistical Bulletin publication on 16 June. Further guidance was also provided with the release of the February to April 2020 microdata. Please consult the documentation for full details. Users should note that within the additional COVID-19 quarters, the pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables are only produced once a quarter by ONS, and so are not available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. It is intended that the Casenop and Hserialp variables in the COVID-19 datasets will be updated at the release of the next standard calendar quarter, when the values for the missing cases will become available. Users should also note that the Income Weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-standard quarters, although the Person Weight (PWT) is included.Weighting methodology information, May 2021 Following advice from ONS Labour Market Division regarding concerns over the estimates for Ethnicity, COB, Nationality and Disability from the LFS and APS, users are advised that levels and changes in levels should be used with caution. Rates published from the LFS and APS remain robust. This will particularly affect estimates for country of birth, nationality, ethnicity and disability, so any analysis using levels for these topics should be suppressed.LFS and APS responses are weighted to official 2018-based population projections on demographic trends that pre-date the coronavirus pandemic. In the Labour Market Division's Coronavirus and the impact on payroll employment article, analysis of the population totals currently used in the LFS weighting process is explained, and the intention to continue to make adjustments when appropriate.The document Labour Force Survey weighting methodology details the reweighting methodology and includes release dates for reweighted estimates. Latest edition informationFor the second edition (June 2022), 2022 weighting variables PIWT22 and PWT22 were added to the study, and 2020 weights removed. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973, then between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also available). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis.This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.New reweighting policyFollowing the new reweighting policy ONS has reviewed the latest population estimates made available during 2019 and have decided not to carry out a 2019 LFS and APS reweighting exercise. Therefore, the next reweighting exercise will take place in 2020. These will incorporate the 2019 Sub-National Population Projection data (published in May 2020) and 2019 Mid-Year Estimates (published in June 2020). It is expected that reweighted Labour Market aggregates and microdata will be published towards the end of 2020/early 2021.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: Secure Access datasets (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to Country of Birth and Nationality variables, 2017:Following a disclosure review in 2016 by the ONS Data Access Team, changes have been made to the LFS Country of Birth and Nationality variables from the July-September 2017 quarter. Four new variables have been created and four variables removed. The new groupings are consistent with those published by the Migration Statistics Unit and so should facilitate users to carry out required analysis of Country of Birth and Nationality. The variables added are: CRYOX7_EUL_Main, CRYOX7_EUL_Sub, NATOX7_EUL_Main and NATOX7_EUL_Sub. The variables removed are: CRYO7, CRYOX7, NATO7 and NATOX7.Variables DISEA and LNGLSTDataset A08 (Labour market status of disabled people) which ONS suspended due to an apparent discontinuity between April to June 2017 and July to September 2017 is now available. As a result of this apparent discontinuity and the inconclusive investigations at this stage, comparisons should be made with caution between April to June 2017 and subsequent time periods. However users should note that the estimates are not seasonally adjusted, so some of the change between quarters could be due to seasonality. Further recommendations on historical comparisons of the estimates will be given in November 2018 when ONS are due to publish estimates for July to September 2018. An ONS Methodology section article on Analysis of the discontinuity in the Labour Force Survey disability data: April to June 2017 to July to September 2017 has also been published. For any queries about Dataset A08 please email Labour.Market@ons.gov.uk ONS methodology reports on the Labour Force Survey, published 2019: A report on progress to assess potential bias in the LFS through a comparison against alternative data sources including proxy labour measures from administrative data: Exploring the use of external data to assess for observed bias in Labour Force Survey estimates: interim findings An update on Progress against the Labour Force Survey National Statistics Quality Review recommendationsLFS response to COVID-19Since April 2020, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata have been delivered to Government Departments and the wider research community through the ONS Secure Research Service and UK Data Service. The first additional microdata to be released covered the period February to April 2020, to coincide with Labour Market Statistical Bulletin publication on 16 June. Further guidance was also provided with the release of the February to April 2020 microdata. Please consult the documentation for full details. Users should note that within the additional COVID-19 quarters, the pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables are only produced once a quarter by ONS, and so are not available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. It is intended that the Casenop and Hserialp variables in the COVID-19 datasets will be updated at the release of the next standard calendar quarter, when the values for the missing cases will become available. Users should also note that the Income Weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-standard quarters, although the Person Weight (PWT) is included.Weighting methodology information, May 2021 Following advice from ONS Labour Market Division regarding concerns over the estimates for Ethnicity, COB, Nationality and Disability from the LFS and APS, users are advised that levels and changes in levels should be used with caution. Rates published from the LFS and APS remain robust. This will particularly affect estimates for country of birth, nationality, ethnicity and disability, so any analysis using levels for these topics should be suppressed.LFS and APS responses are weighted to official 2018-based population projections on demographic trends that pre-date the coronavirus pandemic. In the Labour Market Division's Coronavirus and the impact on payroll employment article, analysis of the population totals currently used in the LFS weighting process is explained, and the intention to continue to make adjustments when appropriate.The document Labour Force Survey weighting methodology details the reweighting methodology and includes release dates for reweighted estimates. Latest edition informationFor the second edition (June 2022), 2022 weighting variable PWT22 was added to the study, and the 2020 weight removed. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview