Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
153 Research products, page 1 of 16

  • COVID-19
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • FR
  • English

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Charlotte, Halpern; Sarti, Francesco;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    contribution à un site web; First lines: In the context of the COVID 19 crisis, the city-as-place approach gained new momentum as part of efforts to ensure safe distancing, accommodate demands for public space and reimagine the post-pandemic city.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hardy, Andrew; Shum, Melody; Ngọc Quyên, Vũ;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Hardy, Andrew, Melody Shum and Vũ Ngọc Quyên. “The ‘F-System’ of Targeted Isolation: A Key Method In Vietnam’s Suppression of Covid-19”. CRISEA European Policy Brief, December 2020. http://crisea.eu/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/PB3-VN-containment-method-05.pdf

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Velasco-Pufleau, Luis;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    All responses to an epidemic crisis are political. At the beginning of February 2020, at the heart of the coronavirus epidemic in Wuhan, the authoritarian Chinese regime massively broadcast the humanitarian song “Believe Love Will Win”. The stated aim of the song was to emotionally support those engaged in the fight against the Covid-19 epidemic, presenting them as heroes of the Chinese nation. However, the making and broadcasting of a humanitarian song means that politics has failed. What is the reason for this? Humanitarian songs have an important place in the depoliticization of responses to crises, constructing representations and shaping official narratives. The songs and the discourses that accompany them conceal the historical and geopolitical depth of humanitarian crises by transforming political issues into moral questions.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    English
    Authors: 
    Abbès, Makram; Bonnefoy, Laurent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The sixteenth issue of Arabian Humanities concludes our special focus on Omani history and society. Our journal is proud to have gathered, over two issues, an impressive and diverse set of authors thanks to the fabulous commitment of three researchers: Marion Breteau, Sterenn Le Maguer and Maho Sebiane who have for long been partners of the Centre français de recherche de la Péninsule Arabique (CEFREPA). While the project had been launched before the Covid-19 pandemic and the end of the five-decade long reign of Sultan Qaboos, it is clear that many of the contributions have been impacted by these two historic events, if only through access to the field in Oman or by providing chronological milestones.In the Sultanate like elsewhere in the Arabian Peninsula, issues linked to travel have become an important matter for foreign researchers. The closure of airports due to the pandemic, the health procedures (however legitimate), and even certain specific costs have complicated our collective capacity to have access to the societies that we study. They have limited the possibility to carry out excavations for archaeologists, discover new archives or even interact, more or less formally, with colleagues who work in universities or academic institutions of the Arabian Peninsula and participate in scientific conferences.In that context, the CEFREPA’s very existence is more than ever an asset. As a French research center which has always valued its permanent presence in the Arabian Peninsula for more than four decades (first in Yemen, then in Saudi Arabia and finally in Kuwait, and has been able to establish partnerships to send researchers for long periods of time in the United Arab Emirates and in Oman), it remains a most relevant tool to reinforce local partnerships and establish fruitful observation posts. It is largely through mutual trust and patience, long standing relationships and collaborations with institutions and actors of the societies we work on, and most importantly we work with, that fieldwork makes full sense. The publications of this issue, focusing on Oman or other areas, are yet another testimony of a philosophy and methodology that despite various crises and difficulties, continues to structure our journal.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Mierzejewski, Dominik; Chatys, Mateusz;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Mierzejewski, Dominik, and Mateusz Chatys. “China’s Covid-19 Diplomacy and the South China Sea Dispute”. CRISEA European Policy Brief, October 2020. http://crisea.eu/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/20-10-15-policy-brief-CRISEA-Mierzejewski-Chatys-FINAL.pdf; At the time of the Covid-19 pandemic, China's diplomacy has been increasingly assertive in global politics and Southeast Asia in particular. In its policies toward ASEAN, Beijing has had to address situations in which small and medium powers involved in territorial disputes with China, placed the South China Sea (SCS) on the international agenda, were pressed by military reactions or moved to gain a possible extension of their continental shelf. China's responses have had two different faces. First, its multi-vector assertive policies, conflicting not only with ASEAN and the United States due to the militarization of the artificial islands in the South China Sea, but also with Taiwan, Hong Kong, India and Japan, have demonstrated the power of the Chinese Communist Party to a domestic audience. Second, China has attempted to portray itself as a positive, even benevolent force, as its ultimate goal is to limit negative reactions to China's South China Sea claims and manage the territorial issues bilaterally, an approach termed "mask diplomacy". Nevertheless, it is at the United Nations that major battles between the parties to the SCS dispute have continued during the first half of 2020.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    English
    Authors: 
    Shirish, Anuragini;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Université Paris-Saclay; During the successive lockdowns caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, 80% of students around the world had to continue their courses online. However, videoconferencing while managing a continuous flow of emails can be exhausting and remote working can be difficult to cope with. A group of researchers, mainly from the Innovation, Technology, Economics & Management Laboratory (LITEM – Univ. Paris-Saclay, Univ. d’Évry, IMT-BS), followed a group of students at Université Paris-Saclay during the first lockdown in Spring 2020. Although some students managed to make the change well, many talked of ‘zoom burnout’ and of no longer being able to face being in front of their screens all day. In fact, whether an individual makes a successful transition to remote learning depends on an element which is often ignored - namely the ability to keep an open mind. [...]

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Lequesne, Christian; Wang, Earl;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    contribution à un site web; Throughout the development of the Covid-19 crisis, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has worked strenuously to frame the story from its perspective – this wouldn’t be a replay of the SARS story in 2013. Not content with simply asserting that its system allowed it to successfully bring the coronavirus epidemic under control, China is seeking to be seen as the saviour by exporting personal protective equipment (PPE) around the world. The country is also using the crisis to promote its authoritarian model while discrediting the actions and systems of the European Union (EU) – Brussels and national capitals – in reacting to the pandemic.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Preux, Pierre-Marie;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Article paru dans le journal "Le Populaire du centre" le 9 Juillet 2020; Distanciation, port du masque, lavage des mains : avec la crainte d’un rebond des cas de Covid-19, les « tubes » de l’été 2020 sont moins légers que les années précédentes. Alors que la période estivale est synonyme de relâchement, l’agence régionale de santé de Nouvelle-Aquitaine et les spécialistes préconisent la vigilance. Barbecues, sorties entre amis, restaurants, visites touristiques… Cette année, les vacances d’été ne vont pas rimer avec insouciance et les occasions de divertissement ou de partage devront s’accompagner de précautions.Certes, l’épidémie est en pleine décrue, le nombre de tests positifs dans les départements limousins est dérisoire sur les trois dernières semaines et la Nouvelle-Aquitaine reste relativement épargnée, laissant croire à l’éloignement de la menace. Mais l’apparition de foyers de contamination, comme en Corrèze la semaine dernière (lire ci-dessous), fait office de piqûre de rappel et l’abandon, ici et là, des gestes barrières interpelle.La Haute-Vienne, en veille et en étude sur le front de l'épidémie de Covid-19Une campagne au ton décaléCar le Covid-19 est toujours là, et les déplacements estivaux risquent de favoriser sa circulation. L’agence régionale de santé a lancé une campagne pour sensibiliser les Néo-aquitains au maintien des gestes barrières. Une campagne de communication au ton volontairement décalé.Exemple sur la distanciation sociale, le message a été décliné en fonction du département. En Haute-Vienne, un mètre est égal à... 9 tasses en porcelaine (ou 10 pour les maladroits). En Corrèze, c'est l'équivalent de 8 cèpes avec une précision : « merci de dévoiler les coins cueillette pour la mesure ! ». Enfin, en Creuse, il s'agit de 7 parts de gâteau creusois. Et ailleurs, il est question d'huîtres, de canelés, de châtaignes... [#COVID19] La distanciation pour les chauvins...euh...on veut dire : pour tous ceux qui sont fiers de leur département. Dans notre belle région, 1 mètre est égale à ??? https://t.co/JsNfbHOTqd?? Faisons bloc contre le coronavirus : coquillages??, crustacés??...& GESTES BARRIERES pic.twitter.com/N7vUTcRefD— ARS Nouvelle-Aquitaine (@ARS_NAquit) July 2, 2020 Des fondamentaux à redire« On a le sentiment qu’il faut redire les fondamentaux, remarque Pierre-Marie Preux, professeur d’épidémiologie à l’université de Limoges. Le virus est très transmissible par voie aérienne. La voie manuportée est plus limitée qu’on ne l’a cru à un moment donné. C’est pour cela que dans les espaces clos et climatisés, la distanciation physique n’est pas suffisante. Il faut mettre un masque. Le porter dans la rue, une fois dehors, après l’avoir délaissé à l’intérieur manque de cohérence, mais ce sont des comportements que l’on constate. »Autre idée à garder à l’esprit : « la transmission du virus dans 50 % des cas se fait par des porteurs asymptomatiques, qu’on ne détecte pas, ou pré-symptomatiques ». Il suffit donc d’une personne en apparence en bonne santé pour en infecter d’autres. De quoi éviter toute velléité de se faire la bise encore un petit moment…La question n’est pas de savoir s’il y aura une deuxième vague, mais quand...« Le virus circule toujours, poursuit le spécialiste limougeaud. On fait certes moins de tests chaque jour en France que prévu : 200.000 contre 700.000. Mais 1,3 % sont positifs et ce n’est pas rien… Il y a tous les jours de nouveaux clusters et quand on regarde le fameux taux de propagation, le “R zéro”, qui indique le nombre de personnes pouvant être contaminées par un malade, il remonte. Légèrement peut-être, mais il ne faudrait pas que cela échappe à tout contrôle. »Pierre-Marie Preux ne souhaite pas jouer les trouble-fête de l’été. « Si le dispositif mis en place pour casser les chaînes de transmission fonctionne, comme cela semble être le cas actuellement, l’été ne devrait pas être catastrophique. Je n’ai pas de boule de cristal pour la rentrée. Cependant, avec la reprise du travail et l’arrivée de l’automne, cela s’annonce plus difficile et la question n’est pas de savoir s’il y aura une deuxième vague, mais quand… »« Ne pas penser que tout cela est fini »Et de regarder au-delà de nos frontières, en citant deux pays de l’hémisphère sud, en hiver, l’Australie et l’Afrique du sud, particulièrement touchés. « Aux États-Unis et en Amérique du Sud, c’est la première vague qui est à l’œuvre et il y a des pays qui ont fait ce qu’il fallait en termes de confinement où ça repart, comme l’Espagne. »Pour l’épidémiologiste, « il ne faut pas penser que tout cela est fini et qu’on est en sécurité ». « Avec ce coronavirus, on ne sait pas trop où on va mais au début, on s’est tous plantés en estimant qu’il était assez inoffensif. Si dans 85 % des cas, les formes sont bénignes, 15 % sont graves et 5 % mortelles… » Un rappel pas inutile, en ces temps ensoleillés mais toujours incertains. Comment profiter de l’été en Nouvelle-Aquitaine sans trop se relâcher face au Covid-19Hélène PommierEn Corrèze, le foyer de contamination sous contrôleS'il fallait une preuve de la nécessité de ne pas se relâcher, c'est la Corrèze qui l'apporte, avec le « cluster » de Brive apparu la semaine dernière. Une situation sous contrôle avec l’application du protocole national : « repérer, tester, isoler ».Le trentenaire, dépisté positif après quelques symptômes (maux de tête), a entraîné trois séries de tests. Dans son milieu professionnel, dans un club de tennis et auprès des vingt-deux personnes ayant participé à une soirée privée le 27 juin à Brive. « Quatre personnes ont été décelées positives, rappelle Sophie Girard, directrice départementale de l’agence régionale de santé (ARS). En identifiant les cas contacts, nous sommes remontés à soixante personnes - et une zone géographique élargie - qui ont été isolées et feront l’objet d’un deuxième test à sept jours. »Sophie Girard se veut malgré tout rassurante : « plus personne n’est hospitalisé en Corrèze et il n’y a plus de patient en "réa" depuis plusieurs semaines. On est clairement dans un repli de l’épidémie ». Le préfet rappelle que les facteurs de risque sont « les rassemblements privés, les milieux professionnels comme les abattoirs ou la population des saisonniers agricoles » lorsque ces derniers sont hébergés dans des logements collectifs souvent petits. Frédéric Veau insiste sur les mesures de distanciation nécessaires. « Faire une fête chez soi, ce n’est pas interdit mais il faut rester prudent. Si on veut profiter de l’été, on ne se relâche pas. » Durant la période estivale, l’ARS et ses partenaires devraient proposer en Corrèze une dizaine de rendez-vous d’information et de dépistage Covid gratuit, proposés au public, « sur des lieux touristiques passants ». Le programme est en cours d’élaboration.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Revet, Sandrine;
    Publisher: Italian Society for Applied Anthropology
    Country: France

    SIAA Speakers' Corner n.3 -- In her latest book “Disasterland. An Ethnography of the International Disaster Community” (Palgrave Macmillan 2020), Sandrine Revet analyses the making of the international world of ‘natural’ disasters by its professionals. Through a long-term ethnographic study of this expert arena, she unveils the elements necessary for the construction of an international world for governing potential risks and upheavals: a collective narrative, a shared language, and standardized practices. The two main framings that these experts use to situate themselves with regards to an over pending disaster are preparedness and resilience. Analyzing these two action devices and intervention logics, she argues that the making of the global world of Disaster Risk Reduction reveals how heterogeneous, conflicting, and often competing elements are put together, and their effects in the long term. In this webinar, these ethnographic lenses will be the starting point for exploring how the current pandemic is being internationally framed, and what the COVID-19 emergency can tell us about our possibilities for action in response to future outbreaks.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    La Scola, Bernard et al.;

    In a preliminary clinical study we observed that the combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin was effective active against SARS-CoV-2 by shortening the duration of viral load in Covid-19 patients. It is of paramount importance to define when a treated patient can be considered as no longer contagious. Correlation between successful isolation of virus in cell culture and Ct value of quantitative RT-PCR targeting E-gene suggests that patients with Ct above 33-34 are not contagious and thus can be discharged from hospital care.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
153 Research products, page 1 of 16
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Charlotte, Halpern; Sarti, Francesco;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    contribution à un site web; First lines: In the context of the COVID 19 crisis, the city-as-place approach gained new momentum as part of efforts to ensure safe distancing, accommodate demands for public space and reimagine the post-pandemic city.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Hardy, Andrew; Shum, Melody; Ngọc Quyên, Vũ;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Hardy, Andrew, Melody Shum and Vũ Ngọc Quyên. “The ‘F-System’ of Targeted Isolation: A Key Method In Vietnam’s Suppression of Covid-19”. CRISEA European Policy Brief, December 2020. http://crisea.eu/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/PB3-VN-containment-method-05.pdf

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Velasco-Pufleau, Luis;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    All responses to an epidemic crisis are political. At the beginning of February 2020, at the heart of the coronavirus epidemic in Wuhan, the authoritarian Chinese regime massively broadcast the humanitarian song “Believe Love Will Win”. The stated aim of the song was to emotionally support those engaged in the fight against the Covid-19 epidemic, presenting them as heroes of the Chinese nation. However, the making and broadcasting of a humanitarian song means that politics has failed. What is the reason for this? Humanitarian songs have an important place in the depoliticization of responses to crises, constructing representations and shaping official narratives. The songs and the discourses that accompany them conceal the historical and geopolitical depth of humanitarian crises by transforming political issues into moral questions.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    English
    Authors: 
    Abbès, Makram; Bonnefoy, Laurent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The sixteenth issue of Arabian Humanities concludes our special focus on Omani history and society. Our journal is proud to have gathered, over two issues, an impressive and diverse set of authors thanks to the fabulous commitment of three researchers: Marion Breteau, Sterenn Le Maguer and Maho Sebiane who have for long been partners of the Centre français de recherche de la Péninsule Arabique (CEFREPA). While the project had been launched before the Covid-19 pandemic and the end of the five-decade long reign of Sultan Qaboos, it is clear that many of the contributions have been impacted by these two historic events, if only through access to the field in Oman or by providing chronological milestones.In the Sultanate like elsewhere in the Arabian Peninsula, issues linked to travel have become an important matter for foreign researchers. The closure of airports due to the pandemic, the health procedures (however legitimate), and even certain specific costs have complicated our collective capacity to have access to the societies that we study. They have limited the possibility to carry out excavations for archaeologists, discover new archives or even interact, more or less formally, with colleagues who work in universities or academic institutions of the Arabian Peninsula and participate in scientific conferences.In that context, the CEFREPA’s very existence is more than ever an asset. As a French research center which has always valued its permanent presence in the Arabian Peninsula for more than four decades (first in Yemen, then in Saudi Arabia and finally in Kuwait, and has been able to establish partnerships to send researchers for long periods of time in the United Arab Emirates and in Oman), it remains a most relevant tool to reinforce local partnerships and establish fruitful observation posts. It is largely through mutual trust and patience, long standing relationships and collaborations with institutions and actors of the societies we work on, and most importantly we work with, that fieldwork makes full sense. The publications of this issue, focusing on Oman or other areas, are yet another testimony of a philosophy and methodology that despite various crises and difficulties, continues to structure our journal.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Mierzejewski, Dominik; Chatys, Mateusz;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Mierzejewski, Dominik, and Mateusz Chatys. “China’s Covid-19 Diplomacy and the South China Sea Dispute”. CRISEA European Policy Brief, October 2020. http://crisea.eu/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/20-10-15-policy-brief-CRISEA-Mierzejewski-Chatys-FINAL.pdf; At the time of the Covid-19 pandemic, China's diplomacy has been increasingly assertive in global politics and Southeast Asia in particular. In its policies toward ASEAN, Beijing has had to address situations in which small and medium powers involved in territorial disputes with China, placed the South China Sea (SCS) on the international agenda, were pressed by military reactions or moved to gain a possible extension of their continental shelf. China's responses have had two different faces. First, its multi-vector assertive policies, conflicting not only with ASEAN and the United States due to the militarization of the artificial islands in the South China Sea, but also with Taiwan, Hong Kong, India and Japan, have demonstrated the power of the Chinese Communist Party to a domestic audience. Second, China has attempted to portray itself as a positive, even benevolent force, as its ultimate goal is to limit negative reactions to China's South China Sea claims and manage the territorial issues bilaterally, an approach termed "mask diplomacy". Nevertheless, it is at the United Nations that major battles between the parties to the SCS dispute have continued during the first half of 2020.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    English
    Authors: 
    Shirish, Anuragini;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Université Paris-Saclay; During the successive lockdowns caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, 80% of students around the world had to continue their courses online. However, videoconferencing while managing a continuous flow of emails can be exhausting and remote working can be difficult to cope with. A group of researchers, mainly from the Innovation, Technology, Economics & Management Laboratory (LITEM – Univ. Paris-Saclay, Univ. d’Évry, IMT-BS), followed a group of students at Université Paris-Saclay during the first lockdown in Spring 2020. Although some students managed to make the change well, many talked of ‘zoom burnout’ and of no longer being able to face being in front of their screens all day. In fact, whether an individual makes a successful transition to remote learning depends on an element which is often ignored - namely the ability to keep an open mind. [...]

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Lequesne, Christian; Wang, Earl;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    contribution à un site web; Throughout the development of the Covid-19 crisis, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has worked strenuously to frame the story from its perspective – this wouldn’t be a replay of the SARS story in 2013. Not content with simply asserting that its system allowed it to successfully bring the coronavirus epidemic under control, China is seeking to be seen as the saviour by exporting personal protective equipment (PPE) around the world. The country is also using the crisis to promote its authoritarian model while discrediting the actions and systems of the European Union (EU) – Brussels and national capitals – in reacting to the pandemic.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Preux, Pierre-Marie;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Article paru dans le journal "Le Populaire du centre" le 9 Juillet 2020; Distanciation, port du masque, lavage des mains : avec la crainte d’un rebond des cas de Covid-19, les « tubes » de l’été 2020 sont moins légers que les années précédentes. Alors que la période estivale est synonyme de relâchement, l’agence régionale de santé de Nouvelle-Aquitaine et les spécialistes préconisent la vigilance. Barbecues, sorties entre amis, restaurants, visites touristiques… Cette année, les vacances d’été ne vont pas rimer avec insouciance et les occasions de divertissement ou de partage devront s’accompagner de précautions.Certes, l’épidémie est en pleine décrue, le nombre de tests positifs dans les départements limousins est dérisoire sur les trois dernières semaines et la Nouvelle-Aquitaine reste relativement épargnée, laissant croire à l’éloignement de la menace. Mais l’apparition de foyers de contamination, comme en Corrèze la semaine dernière (lire ci-dessous), fait office de piqûre de rappel et l’abandon, ici et là, des gestes barrières interpelle.La Haute-Vienne, en veille et en étude sur le front de l'épidémie de Covid-19Une campagne au ton décaléCar le Covid-19 est toujours là, et les déplacements estivaux risquent de favoriser sa circulation. L’agence régionale de santé a lancé une campagne pour sensibiliser les Néo-aquitains au maintien des gestes barrières. Une campagne de communication au ton volontairement décalé.Exemple sur la distanciation sociale, le message a été décliné en fonction du département. En Haute-Vienne, un mètre est égal à... 9 tasses en porcelaine (ou 10 pour les maladroits). En Corrèze, c'est l'équivalent de 8 cèpes avec une précision : « merci de dévoiler les coins cueillette pour la mesure ! ». Enfin, en Creuse, il s'agit de 7 parts de gâteau creusois. Et ailleurs, il est question d'huîtres, de canelés, de châtaignes... [#COVID19] La distanciation pour les chauvins...euh...on veut dire : pour tous ceux qui sont fiers de leur département. Dans notre belle région, 1 mètre est égale à ??? https://t.co/JsNfbHOTqd?? Faisons bloc contre le coronavirus : coquillages??, crustacés??...& GESTES BARRIERES pic.twitter.com/N7vUTcRefD— ARS Nouvelle-Aquitaine (@ARS_NAquit) July 2, 2020 Des fondamentaux à redire« On a le sentiment qu’il faut redire les fondamentaux, remarque Pierre-Marie Preux, professeur d’épidémiologie à l’université de Limoges. Le virus est très transmissible par voie aérienne. La voie manuportée est plus limitée qu’on ne l’a cru à un moment donné. C’est pour cela que dans les espaces clos et climatisés, la distanciation physique n’est pas suffisante. Il faut mettre un masque. Le porter dans la rue, une fois dehors, après l’avoir délaissé à l’intérieur manque de cohérence, mais ce sont des comportements que l’on constate. »Autre idée à garder à l’esprit : « la transmission du virus dans 50 % des cas se fait par des porteurs asymptomatiques, qu’on ne détecte pas, ou pré-symptomatiques ». Il suffit donc d’une personne en apparence en bonne santé pour en infecter d’autres. De quoi éviter toute velléité de se faire la bise encore un petit moment…La question n’est pas de savoir s’il y aura une deuxième vague, mais quand...« Le virus circule toujours, poursuit le spécialiste limougeaud. On fait certes moins de tests chaque jour en France que prévu : 200.000 contre 700.000. Mais 1,3 % sont positifs et ce n’est pas rien… Il y a tous les jours de nouveaux clusters et quand on regarde le fameux taux de propagation, le “R zéro”, qui indique le nombre de personnes pouvant être contaminées par un malade, il remonte. Légèrement peut-être, mais il ne faudrait pas que cela échappe à tout contrôle. »Pierre-Marie Preux ne souhaite pas jouer les trouble-fête de l’été. « Si le dispositif mis en place pour casser les chaînes de transmission fonctionne, comme cela semble être le cas actuellement, l’été ne devrait pas être catastrophique. Je n’ai pas de boule de cristal pour la rentrée. Cependant, avec la reprise du travail et l’arrivée de l’automne, cela s’annonce plus difficile et la question n’est pas de savoir s’il y aura une deuxième vague, mais quand… »« Ne pas penser que tout cela est fini »Et de regarder au-delà de nos frontières, en citant deux pays de l’hémisphère sud, en hiver, l’Australie et l’Afrique du sud, particulièrement touchés. « Aux États-Unis et en Amérique du Sud, c’est la première vague qui est à l’œuvre et il y a des pays qui ont fait ce qu’il fallait en termes de confinement où ça repart, comme l’Espagne. »Pour l’épidémiologiste, « il ne faut pas penser que tout cela est fini et qu’on est en sécurité ». « Avec ce coronavirus, on ne sait pas trop où on va mais au début, on s’est tous plantés en estimant qu’il était assez inoffensif. Si dans 85 % des cas, les formes sont bénignes, 15 % sont graves et 5 % mortelles… » Un rappel pas inutile, en ces temps ensoleillés mais toujours incertains. Comment profiter de l’été en Nouvelle-Aquitaine sans trop se relâcher face au Covid-19Hélène PommierEn Corrèze, le foyer de contamination sous contrôleS'il fallait une preuve de la nécessité de ne pas se relâcher, c'est la Corrèze qui l'apporte, avec le « cluster » de Brive apparu la semaine dernière. Une situation sous contrôle avec l’application du protocole national : « repérer, tester, isoler ».Le trentenaire, dépisté positif après quelques symptômes (maux de tête), a entraîné trois séries de tests. Dans son milieu professionnel, dans un club de tennis et auprès des vingt-deux personnes ayant participé à une soirée privée le 27 juin à Brive. « Quatre personnes ont été décelées positives, rappelle Sophie Girard, directrice départementale de l’agence régionale de santé (ARS). En identifiant les cas contacts, nous sommes remontés à soixante personnes - et une zone géographique élargie - qui ont été isolées et feront l’objet d’un deuxième test à sept jours. »Sophie Girard se veut malgré tout rassurante : « plus personne n’est hospitalisé en Corrèze et il n’y a plus de patient en "réa" depuis plusieurs semaines. On est clairement dans un repli de l’épidémie ». Le préfet rappelle que les facteurs de risque sont « les rassemblements privés, les milieux professionnels comme les abattoirs ou la population des saisonniers agricoles » lorsque ces derniers sont hébergés dans des logements collectifs souvent petits. Frédéric Veau insiste sur les mesures de distanciation nécessaires. « Faire une fête chez soi, ce n’est pas interdit mais il faut rester prudent. Si on veut profiter de l’été, on ne se relâche pas. » Durant la période estivale, l’ARS et ses partenaires devraient proposer en Corrèze une dizaine de rendez-vous d’information et de dépistage Covid gratuit, proposés au public, « sur des lieux touristiques passants ». Le programme est en cours d’élaboration.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Revet, Sandrine;
    Publisher: Italian Society for Applied Anthropology
    Country: France

    SIAA Speakers' Corner n.3 -- In her latest book “Disasterland. An Ethnography of the International Disaster Community” (Palgrave Macmillan 2020), Sandrine Revet analyses the making of the international world of ‘natural’ disasters by its professionals. Through a long-term ethnographic study of this expert arena, she unveils the elements necessary for the construction of an international world for governing potential risks and upheavals: a collective narrative, a shared language, and standardized practices. The two main framings that these experts use to situate themselves with regards to an over pending disaster are preparedness and resilience. Analyzing these two action devices and intervention logics, she argues that the making of the global world of Disaster Risk Reduction reveals how heterogeneous, conflicting, and often competing elements are put together, and their effects in the long term. In this webinar, these ethnographic lenses will be the starting point for exploring how the current pandemic is being internationally framed, and what the COVID-19 emergency can tell us about our possibilities for action in response to future outbreaks.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    La Scola, Bernard et al.;

    In a preliminary clinical study we observed that the combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin was effective active against SARS-CoV-2 by shortening the duration of viral load in Covid-19 patients. It is of paramount importance to define when a treated patient can be considered as no longer contagious. Correlation between successful isolation of virus in cell culture and Ct value of quantitative RT-PCR targeting E-gene suggests that patients with Ct above 33-34 are not contagious and thus can be discharged from hospital care.