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2 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • COVID-19
  • Research data
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  • Open Access
  • PRONKJEWAIL
  • ER-phagy mechanisms to maintain and restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis

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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cong, Yingying; Verlhac, Pauline; Reggiori, Fulvio;
    Project: SNSF | ER-phagy mechanisms to ma... (154421), NWO | A three-dimensional look ... (2300175771), EC | PRONKJEWAIL (713660)

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular catabolic pathway that allows cells to maintain homeostasis through the degradation of deleterious components via specialized double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. During the past decades, it has been revealed that numerous pathogens, including viruses, usurp autophagy in order to promote their propagation. Nidovirales are an order of enveloped viruses with large single-stranded positive RNA genomes. Four virus families (Arterividae, Coronaviridae, Mesoniviridae, and Roniviridae) are part of this order, which comprises several human and animal pathogens of medical and veterinary importance. In host cells, Nidovirales induce membrane rearrangements including autophagosome formation. The relevance and putative mechanism of autophagy usurpation, however, remain largely elusive. Here, we review the current knowledge about the possible interplay between Nidovirales and autophagy.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mauthe, Mario; Idil Orhon; Rocchi, Cecilia; Xingdong Zhou; Luhr, Morten; Kerst-Jan Hijlkema; Coppes, Robert P.; Engedal, Nikolai; Mari, Muriel; Reggiori, Fulvio;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: EC | PRONKJEWAIL (713660), SNSF | ER-phagy mechanisms to ma... (154421)

    Macroautophagy/autophagy is a conserved transport pathway where targeted structures are sequestered by phagophores, which mature into autophagosomes, and then delivered into lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy is involved in the pathophysiology of numerous diseases and its modulation is beneficial for the outcome of numerous specific diseases. Several lysosomal inhibitors such as bafilomycin A1 (BafA1), protease inhibitors and chloroquine (CQ), have been used interchangeably to block autophagy in in vitro experiments assuming that they all primarily block lysosomal degradation. Among them, only CQ and its derivate hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are FDA-approved drugs and are thus currently the principal compounds used in clinical trials aimed to treat tumors through autophagy inhibition. However, the precise mechanism of how CQ blocks autophagy remains to be firmly demonstrated. In this study, we focus on how CQ inhibits autophagy and directly compare its effects to those of BafA1. We show that CQ mainly inhibits autophagy by impairing autophagosome fusion with lysosomes rather than by affecting the acidity and/or degradative activity of this organelle. Furthermore, CQ induces an autophagy-independent severe disorganization of the Golgi and endo-lysosomal systems, which might contribute to the fusion impairment. Strikingly, HCQ-treated mice also show a Golgi disorganization in kidney and intestinal tissues. Altogether, our data reveal that CQ and HCQ are not bona fide surrogates for other types of late stage lysosomal inhibitors for in vivo experiments. Moreover, the multiple cellular alterations caused by CQ and HCQ call for caution when interpreting results obtained by blocking autophagy with this drug.