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81 Research products

  • COVID-19
  • 2019-2023
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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Authors: Office for National Statistics;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS.The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973-1983, then annually between 1984 and 1991, comprising a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter. From 1992 it moved to a quarterly cycle with a sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. Northern Ireland was also included in the survey from December 1994. Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.The UK Data Service also holds a Secure Access version of the QLFS (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; LFS datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned (the latest questionnaire available covers July-September 2022). Volumes are updated periodically, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis. This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.LFS response to COVID-19From April 2020 to May 2022, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata were made available to cover the pandemic period. The first additional microdata to be released covered February to April 2020 and the final non-calendar dataset covered March-May 2022. Publication then returned to calendar quarters only. Within the additional non-calendar COVID-19 quarters, pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables may not be available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. The income weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-calendar quarters, although the person weight (PWT) is included. Please consult the documentation for full details.Occupation data for 2021 and 2022 data filesThe ONS has identified an issue with the collection of some occupational data in 2021 and 2022 data files in a number of their surveys. While they estimate any impacts will be small overall, this will affect the accuracy of the breakdowns of some detailed (four-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)) occupations, and data derived from them. Further information can be found in the ONS article published on 11 July 2023: Revision of miscoded occupational data in the ONS Labour Force Survey, UK: January 2021 to September 2022.2022 WeightingThe population totals used for the latest LFS estimates use projected growth rates from Real Time Information (RTI) data for UK, EU and non-EU populations based on 2021 patterns. The total population used for the LFS therefore does not take into account any changes in migration, birth rates, death rates, and so on since June 2021, and hence levels estimates may be under- or over-estimating the true values and should be used with caution. Estimates of rates will, however, be robust.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataTwo versions of the QLFS are available from UKDS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Four sampling frames are used. See documentation for details. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview The first interview is conducted face-to-face, and subsequent interviews by telephone where possible.

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  • Authors: NatCen Social Research;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey series began in 1983. The series is designed to produce annual measures of attitudinal movements to complement large-scale government surveys that deal largely with facts and behaviour patterns, and the data on party political attitudes produced by opinion polls. One of the BSA's main purposes is to allow the monitoring of patterns of continuity and change, and the examination of the relative rates at which attitudes, in respect of a range of social issues, change over time. Some questions are asked regularly, others less often. Funding for BSA comes from a number of sources (including government departments, the Economic and Social Research Council and other research foundations), but the final responsibility for the coverage and wording of the annual questionnaires rests with NatCen Social Research (formerly Social and Community Planning Research). The BSA has been conducted every year since 1983, except in 1988 and 1992 when core funding was devoted to the British Election Study (BES).Further information about the series and links to publications may be found on the NatCen Social Research British Social Attitudes webpage. BSA 2021The 2021 BSA survey used a mixed-mode push-to-web design with an optional Computer-Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) opt-in. Letters were sent to a random sample of addresses inviting up to two household members to complete the survey online, with an option to be interviewed by phone if preferred. This is the same design used for the 2020 BSA. Before 2020, BSA was a face-to-face survey, but this was changed due to the public health measures introduced in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The full BSA 2021 report, Broken Britain? Public attitudes in an era of crisis is available from the NatCen Social Research website. Main Topics:Each year, the BSA interview questionnaire contains a number of 'core' questions, which are repeated in most years. In addition, a wide range of background and classificatory questions is included. The remainder of the questionnaire is devoted to a series of questions (modules) on a range of social, economic, political and moral issues - some are asked regularly, others less often. Cross-indexes of those questions asked more than once appear in the reports. In 2021 the questionnaire included the following topics: Household Composition, Employment, Politics, Welfare, Benefits and Income, National Identity and Ethnicity, Religion, Disability, Education, EU Referendum and the General Election, Benefits and Income, Spending and Governance, Immigration, Equal Opportunities, Identity and Britishness, Work and Health, Child Maintenance, Digital, Work and COVID-19, Pensions and Retirement, Sexual Relationships, Parental Leave, Disability, Mental Health and the Workplace, Social Mobility, Social Class, Satisfaction with Health and Care Services, Health and Care Spending, NHS Priorities and Principles, New Home Building, Buying or Renting a Home, COVID-19 and the Home. Multi-stage stratified random sample See documentation for each BSA year for full details. Self-administered questionnaire: Web-based (CAWI) Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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  • Authors: Entwistle, V, University of Aberdeen; Riley, J, University of Aberdeen; Arnason, A, University of Aberdeen; Maccagno, P, University of Aberdeen;

    The Care in Funerals project drew upon 67 semi-structured qualitative interviews with 68 individuals who had been bereaved, and/or worked or volunteered in deathcare and funeral provision in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interviews explored their experiences during the pandemic, evaluations of what was good and what was less good, how they responded, and suggestions of what might be improved going forward. They also examined what interviewees understood by the term 'care' in relation to funerals. All participants gave informed consent to participate. Interviews had a mean length of one hour, and were conducted using video calling software or, in some cases, telephone, between April 2021 and April 2022. This dataset consists of 63 transcripts (two interviewees were interviewed together in one case) all of which have had identifying details removed such that the participants cannot be identified. Four transcripts have been withheld as permission was not granted by participants for their inclusion in a data repository.Funeral provision in the UK was significantly disrupted when COVID-19 infection control policies constrained how and by whom bodies could be attended to and moved to burial/cremation sites; how funeral directors and celebrants could communicate with bereaved families; and possibilities for gathering for funerals, mourning and memorialising activities. The regulations generated significant distress and perceptions of injustice. They also prompted the development of new funeral practices - inviting important questions about funeral provision. Our interdisciplinary research starts from a recognition of funeral provision as a form of care (and set of caring practices) oriented towards people who have died and their bereaved family, friends and communities. It addresses neglected ethical aspects of funeral provision, including, in the context of COVID-19, questions of fairness and the moral dimensions of distress evident in family members' and funeral directors' worries about not fulfilling important responsibilities, or doing wrong, to those who have died or been bereaved. Our ethical analyses will be grounded in an ethnographic examination of changed practices and experiences that includes: (1) analysis of funeral artefacts, including online films, tribute pages, and written accounts; (2) interviews with diverse bereaved family members, funeral directors and celebrants. We will attend carefully to what people consider good and right (or not) and why in different circumstances. We will develop practical ethical analyses of post-death care that address tensions between different purposes of funerals and diverse perspectives on post-death responsibilities. Discussion events with key stakeholders will inform the development of resources for future policy and practice. Those who expressed interest were sent participant information and a consent form and offered an opportunity to discuss the study before deciding whether to take part. Interviews took place online or by telephone. We received informed consent verbally (recorded) or in writing (by email). Four researchers conducted the interviews, using shared topic guides. After broad opening questions, they followed participants’ conversational leads while covering key topics, including their experiences of funerals during the pandemic, what they felt was challenging about these funerals, and what made a funeral ‘good’. Interviewers wrote fieldnotes summarising the interview, noting key impressions and capturing any information provided ‘off tape.’ Interviews were transcribed verbatim by an external company, then checked for accuracy and anonymised by members of the research team.

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    Other ORP type . 2023
    Data sources: B2FIND
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  • Authors: Department for Work and Pensions;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Family Resources Survey (FRS) has been running continuously since 1992 to meet the information needs of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). It is almost wholly funded by DWP. The FRS collects information from a large, and representative sample of private households in the United Kingdom (prior to 2002, it covered Great Britain only). The interview year runs from April to March.The focus of the survey is on income, and how much comes from the many possible sources (such as employee earnings, self-employed earnings or profits from businesses, and dividends; individual pensions; state benefits, including Universal Credit and the State Pension; and other sources such as savings and investments). Specific items of expenditure, such as rent or mortgage, Council Tax and water bills, are also covered.Many other topics are covered and the dataset has a very wide range of personal characteristics, at the adult or child, family and then household levels. These include education, caring, childcare and disability. The dataset also captures material deprivation, household food security and (new for 2021/22) household food bank usage. The FRS is a national statistic whose results are published on the gov.uk website. It is also possible to create your own tables from FRS data, using DWP’s Stat Xplore tool. Further information can be found on the gov.uk Family Resources Survey webpage. Safe Room Access FRS data In addition to the standard End User Licence (EUL) version, Safe Room access datasets, containing unrounded data and additional variables, are also available for FRS from 2005/06 onwards - see SN 7196, where the extra contents are listed. The Safe Room version also includes secure access versions of the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) and Pensioners' Incomes (PI) datasets. The Safe Room access data are currently only available to UK HE/FE applicants and for access at the UK Data Archive's Safe Room at the University of Essex, Colchester. Prospective users of the Safe Room access version of the FRS/HBAI/PI will need to fulfil additional requirements beyond those associated with the EUL datasets. Full details of the application requirements are available from Guidance on applying for the Family Resources Survey: Secure Access.FRS, HBAI and PIThe FRS underpins the related Households Below Average Income (HBAI) dataset, which focuses on poverty in the UK, and the related Pensioners' Incomes (PI) dataset. The EUL versions of HBAI and PI are held under SNs 5828 and 8503 respectively. The secure access versions are held within the Safe Room FRS study under SN 7196 (see above). Latest version informationIn June 2023, two changes were made to the 'HOUSEHOL' file. The variable BEDROOM6 was replaced with an updated version, and a new variable, CTAMTBND (Annual council tax payment bands), was added. The Excel Variable Listing document was updated accordingly. Main Topics: Household characteristics (family composition, tenure); COVID-19, housing costs including rent or details of mortgage; household bills including Council Tax, buildings and contents insurance, water and sewerage rates; receipt of state support from all state benefits, including Universal Credit and Tax Credits; household food security and household food bank usage; educational level and grants and loans; children in education; care, both those receiving care and those caring for others; childcare; occupation, employment, self-employment and earnings/wage details; income tax payments and refunds; National Insurance contributions; earnings from odd jobs; health, restrictions on work, children's health, and disability or limiting long-standing illness; personal and occupational pension schemes; income from pensions and trusts, royalties and allowances, and other sources; children's earnings; interest and dividends from investments including National Savings products, stocks and shares; and total household assets. Multi-stage stratified random sample Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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    Other ORP type . 2023
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  • Authors: Office for National Statistics;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS.The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973-1983, then annually between 1984 and 1991, comprising a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter. From 1992 it moved to a quarterly cycle with a sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. Northern Ireland was also included in the survey from December 1994. Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.The UK Data Service also holds a Secure Access version of the QLFS (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; LFS datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned (the latest questionnaire available covers July-September 2022). Volumes are updated periodically, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis. This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.LFS response to COVID-19From April 2020 to May 2022, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata were made available to cover the pandemic period. The first additional microdata to be released covered February to April 2020 and the final non-calendar dataset covered March-May 2022. Publication then returned to calendar quarters only. Within the additional non-calendar COVID-19 quarters, pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables may not be available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. The income weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-calendar quarters, although the person weight (PWT) is included. Please consult the documentation for full details.Occupation data for 2021 and 2022 data filesThe ONS has identified an issue with the collection of some occupational data in 2021 and 2022 data files in a number of their surveys. While they estimate any impacts will be small overall, this will affect the accuracy of the breakdowns of some detailed (four-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)) occupations, and data derived from them. Further information can be found in the ONS article published on 11 July 2023: Revision of miscoded occupational data in the ONS Labour Force Survey, UK: January 2021 to September 2022.2022 WeightingThe population totals used for the latest LFS estimates use projected growth rates from Real Time Information (RTI) data for UK, EU and non-EU populations based on 2021 patterns. The total population used for the LFS therefore does not take into account any changes in migration, birth rates, death rates, and so on since June 2021, and hence levels estimates may be under- or over-estimating the true values and should be used with caution. Estimates of rates will, however, be robust.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataTwo versions of the QLFS are available from UKDS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Four sampling frames are used. See documentation for details. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview The first interview is conducted face-to-face, and subsequent interviews by telephone where possible.

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    Other ORP type . 2023
    Data sources: B2FIND
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  • Authors: Hanson, T., City University, Department of Sociology; Fitzgerald, R.; Comanaru, R., City University;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. This dataset is the result of an experimental fielding of the Round 11 European Social Survey (ESS) as a self-completion (web and paper) survey in Great Britain. Data collection was carried out between November 2021 and March 2022. The total number of cases included in the data file is 2,908. This includes fully completed questionnaires and those where at least 75% of 'ask all' questions were answered. 2,116 responses were via web and 792 were on paper. The response rate was between 36% and 40%, depending on which assumption is applied regarding ineligible cases (see the technical report for further details). The experiment also included an incentive experiment, with different levels of conditional incentive randomly assigned to sample units. The incentive condition is flagged in the data file. It is expected that users may compare this data with the UK ESS Round 10 data (based on a face-to-face approach), which is expected to be released via the ESS Data Archive in early 2023. Main Topics: The European Social Survey (ESS) is a general social survey, which covers public attitudes and behaviour across a range of topic areas. It is divided into a core section (that is repeated for all survey rounds) and two rotating modules (that vary between rounds). The topics covered by the core include media use, internet use, social trust, political interest, trust in institutions, civic participation, voting and political party allegiance, subjective wellbeing, crime, religion, discrimination and identity. For Round 11 of the survey (on which this data set is based), the two rotating modules were "Understandings and Evaluations of Democracy" and "Digital Social Contacts in Work and Family Life". The survey includes an extensive social-demographics section, collecting information on the respondent, their partner and their parents. The Round 11 survey also includes a module on experiences of and attitudes towards the COVID-19 pandemic. Multi-stage stratified random sample Self-administered questionnaire: Web-based (CAWI) Self-administered questionnaire: Paper

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    Other ORP type . 2023
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  • Authors: Office for National Statistics;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Alongside the usual Classification questions, this study includes the following non-core OPN modules:MAZ Internet Access module, run in January, February and April 2018 (also includes questions on Citizenship (passports), and Higher Education (whether respondent has a degree). This module was conducted on behalf of ONS and covers internet use for work, leisure, purchasing, banking, and other services, via computers, mobile devices and smartphones.MAK Train Satisfaction module, run in February 2018. This module was conducted on behalf of the Department for Transport and covers short- and long-distance train travel and opinions on various aspects of train services. (This module was previously held separately under SN 8576, which is no longer available.) Main Topics: Internet access and use, train travel and satisfaction with rail services, citizenship, higher education, and other demographics. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

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  • Authors: Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The English Housing Survey (EHS) is a continuous national survey commissioned by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) that collects information about people's housing circumstances and the condition and energy efficiency of housing in England. The EHS brings together two previous survey series into a single fieldwork operation: the English House Condition Survey (EHCS) (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33158) and the Survey of English Housing (SEH) (available under GN 33277). The EHS covers all housing tenures and provides valuable information and evidence to inform the development and monitoring of the department's housing policies. Results from the survey are also used by a wide range of other users including other government departments, local authorities, housing associations, landlords, academics, construction industry professionals, consultants, and the general public. The EHS has a complex multi-stage methodology consisting of two main elements; an initial interview survey of around 14,000 households and a follow-up physical inspection. Some further elements are also periodically included in or derived from the EHS: for 2008 and 2009, a desk-based market valuation was conducted of a sub-sample of 8,000 dwellings (including vacant ones), but this was not carried out from 2010 onwards. A periodic follow-up survey of private landlords and agents (the Private Landlords Survey (PLS)) is conducted using information from the EHS interview survey. Fuel Poverty datasets are also available from 2003, created by the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The EHS interview survey sample formed part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) (available from the Archive under GN 33420) from April 2008 to April 2011. During this period the core questions from the IHS formed part of the EHS questionnaire. End User Licence and Special Licence Versions: From 2014 data onwards, the End User Licence (EUL) versions of the EHS only include derived variables. In addition the number of variables on the EUL datasets from that date has been reduced and disclosure control increased on certain remaining variables. The new Special Licence versions of the EHS, which are subject to more restrictive access conditions, are of a similar nature to EHS EUL datasets prior to 2014 and include both derived and raw datasets. Further information about the EHS and the latest news, reports and tables can be found on the GOV.UK English Housing Survey web pages. The English Housing Survey, 2020: Housing Stock Data includes data from a two-year rolling sample with the appropriate two-year weights, and covers the period April 2019 to March 2021.Fieldwork was suspended between April and June 2020 because of restrictions introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic and, for the same reason, carrying out face-to-face fieldwork was not possible for the remainder of the year. The EHS was therefore carried out over a reduced fieldwork period between July, 2020 and April, 2021 using a 'push-to-telephone' approach and an 'external plus' physical survey where internal inspections of properties were replaced with external inspections, where the inspection was restricted to an assessment of the exterior of the dwelling and supplemented by information about the interior of the dwelling the surveyor collected (socially distanced) at the doorstep.Some of the raw data required for modelling could not be collected, in which case predictive modelled estimates at dwelling level were produced to indicate whether or not a dwelling: had damp problems; had any Category 1 hazards assessed through the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS); or met the Decent Homes Standard. Main Topics: The EHS Housing survey consists of two components:Interview Survey on the Participating HouseholdAn interview is first conducted with the householder. The interview topics include: household characteristics, satisfaction with the home and the area, disability and adaptations to the home, ownership and rental details and income details. All interviewees are guaranteed confidentiality and all data is anonymised.Physical Survey on the Housing StockA visual inspection of both the interior and exterior of the dwelling is carried out by a qualified surveyor to assess the condition and energy efficiency of the dwelling. Topics covered include whether the dwelling meets the Decent Homes Standard; cost to make the dwelling decent; existence of damp and Category 1 Hazards as measured by the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS); Energy Efficiency Rating. The physical survey is carried out on the dwelling of a sub-sample of the participants of the interview survey. The sub-sample consists of the dwelling of participants living in private or social rented properties and a sub-sample of those in owner occupied properties. A proportion of dwelling found to be vacant during the interview survey are also included in physical survey. An 'external plus' physical survey was completed during the COVID-19 pandemic due to restrictions.This dataset contains data from the households who have taken part in both the interview and physical surveys. The Interview survey data on their own are available in a separate study (the Household Data available from the UK Data Archive under SN 9077). Multi-stage stratified random sample Visual inspection of the fabric of the dwelling Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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  • Authors: Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The English Housing Survey (EHS) is a continuous national survey commissioned by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) that collects information about people's housing circumstances and the condition and energy efficiency of housing in England. The EHS brings together two previous survey series into a single fieldwork operation: the English House Condition Survey (EHCS) (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33158) and the Survey of English Housing (SEH) (available under GN 33277). The EHS covers all housing tenures and provides valuable information and evidence to inform the development and monitoring of the department's housing policies. Results from the survey are also used by a wide range of other users including other government departments, local authorities, housing associations, landlords, academics, construction industry professionals, consultants, and the general public. The EHS has a complex multi-stage methodology consisting of two main elements; an initial interview survey of around 14,000 households and a follow-up physical inspection. Some further elements are also periodically included in or derived from the EHS: for 2008 and 2009, a desk-based market valuation was conducted of a sub-sample of 8,000 dwellings (including vacant ones), but this was not carried out from 2010 onwards. A periodic follow-up survey of private landlords and agents (the Private Landlords Survey (PLS)) is conducted using information from the EHS interview survey. Fuel Poverty datasets are also available from 2003, created by the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The EHS interview survey sample formed part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) (available from the Archive under GN 33420) from April 2008 to April 2011. During this period the core questions from the IHS formed part of the EHS questionnaire. End User Licence and Special Licence Versions: From 2014 data onwards, the End User Licence (EUL) versions of the EHS only include derived variables. In addition the number of variables on the EUL datasets from that date has been reduced and disclosure control increased on certain remaining variables. The new Special Licence versions of the EHS, which are subject to more restrictive access conditions, are of a similar nature to EHS EUL datasets prior to 2014 and include both derived and raw datasets. Further information about the EHS and the latest news, reports and tables can be found on the GOV.UK English Housing Survey web pages. The English Housing Survey, 2020-21 data was collected during the COVID-19 pandemic which necessitated a change in the established survey mode. Fieldwork was suspended between April and June 2020 and carrying out face-to-face fieldwork was not possible for the remainder of the year. The EHS was therefore carried out over a reduced fieldwork period between July, 2020 and April, 2021 using a 'push-to-telephone' approach and an 'external plus' physical survey where internal inspections of properties were replaced with external inspections, where the inspection was restricted to an assessment of the exterior of the dwelling and supplemented by information about the interior of the dwelling the surveyor collected (socially distanced) at the doorstep.Some of the raw data required for modelling could not be collected, in which case predictive modelled estimates at dwelling level were produced to indicate whether or not a dwelling: had damp problems; had any Category 1 hazards assessed through the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS); or met the Decent Homes Standard. Main Topics: The EHS Housing survey consists of two components:Interview Survey on the Participating HouseholdAn interview is first conducted with the householder. The interview topics include: household characteristics, satisfaction with the home and the area, disability and adaptations to the home, ownership and rental details and income details. All interviewees are guaranteed confidentiality and all data is anonymised.Physical Survey on the Housing StockAs detailed above, an 'external plus' physical survey was completed during the COVID-19 pandemic due to restrictions.This dataset contains data from the interview survey only. The data from the physical survey are available in a separate study (the Housing Stock Dataset available from the UK Data Archive under SN 9076). Multi-stage stratified random sample Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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  • Authors: Diewald, Martin; Kandler, Christian; Riemann, Rainer; Spinath, Frank M.; +31 Authors

    TwinLife is a 12-year representative behavior genetic study investigating the emergence and development of social inequalities over the life course. For a detailed documentation of the study please visit https://www.twin-life.de/documentation/ . The long-term project began in 2014 and surveys more than 4,000 pairs of twins and their families in different stages of life on a yearly basis. All of the subjects reside in Germany. Not only social, but also genetic mechanisms as well as covariations and interactions between these two factors can be examined with the help of identical and fraternal same-sex twins. In order to document the individual development of different aspects it is important to examine the families extensively over the course of several years. Six important contextual domains are focused on: 1. Education and academic performance / skill development, 2. career and labor market attainment, 3. integration and participation in social, cultural and political life, 4. quality of life and perceived capabilities, 5. physical and psychological health and 6. behavioral problems and deviant behavior. In 2020 and 2021, three supplementary surveys on the influences and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic took place. The first supplemental survey aimed to retrospectively capture the behavior, attitudes, stresses, health, and socioeconomic changes during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic from March 2020 through the first relaxations of the lockdown measures. The second supplemental survey aimed to assess current behaviors, attitudes, stresses, health, and socioeconomic changes during the COVID-19 pandemic. The third supplemental COVID-19 survey aimed to capture current attitudes, stresses, health, and socioeconomic changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the following, the TwinLife Data are described in more detail by the life domains outlined above: 1. Skill formation and education 1.1 Educational success: - School report; if not available: supplementary questions - Current school marks or rather marks of highest graduation - School climate/student-teacher-interaction - Pressure and stress at school 1.2 Intelligence - Subtests Matrices, Series, and Classification - Subtests Matrices, Series, Reasoning, Classification 1.3 Cognitive development - General information derived from ´U-Heft´; if not available: supplementary questions - Interviewer rating on task orientation and oral skills following intelligence test - Tutoring and homework help/special educational treatment/attendance of special school - Competence rating of social skills, oral skills, concentration ability, communications skills, mathematic ability, general knowledge 1.4 Media use - Frequency and duration of media use (e.g., Internet, Laptop, TV, games console etc.) 1.5 Academic self-concept - Verbal and spatial skills, spatial and general - Verbal, mathematic, and general academic ability - Perceived competence 1.6 Intrinsic motivation, learning motivation, achievement motivation - Educational values of German, maths, and school in general - Learning and achievement motivation in German, maths, and school in general - Learning goals 1.7 Self-efficacy - General self-efficacy 1.8 Self-esteem - General self-esteem 1.9 Self-regulation - Consistency of interest, self-control - Gummy bear test 1.10 Personality - Neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, conscientiousness 2. Career and labor market attainment 2.1 Employment status - Current employment status/changes regarding employment 2.2 Education - History of education - Education and qualification - Educational and career aspirations 2.3 Information on current job - Perceived job security and satisfaction - Wages/income/welfare dependency - job-related burden (i.e. shiftwork) 2.4 Economic preferences - Risk aversion 2.5 Job autonomy 3. Integration and participation in social, cultural, and political life 3.1 Migration background and citizenship - Current status of citizenship and changes of citizenship - Migration 3.2 Discrimination - Experiences with discrimination 3.3 Social participation - Frequency of attendance in sports clubs, theatre, music groups or volunteer organizations 3.4 Social networks - Social capital of individuals, e.g., close friends, frequency of social contacts - Loneliness 3.5 Political participation - Interest in politics, political preferences, voting behavior 3.6 Religion - Religious affiliation, church attendance, religiosity/spirituality 3.7 Cultural capital - cultural participation, reading, clasical music - Availability of cultural property - Music lessons 4. Subjective perceptions of quality of life 4.1 Life satisfaction - Global life satisfaction - Domain satisfaction (health, work life, family life, leisure time, school, romantic relationship, friendships, income) - Satisfaction with sibling relationship - Optimism 4.2 Burden and stress - frequency of arguments with partner or parents - Stress regulation and coping - interfamiliar and extrafamiliar: subjective evaluation 4.3 Life Goals: importance and progress 4.4 Sensory-processing sensitivity 4.5 Bullying - in the childhood and adolescence 5. Physical and psychological health 5.1 Subjective health 5.2 Objective health and diagnosis - Measures of height and weight child´s medical records - Depression - Pregnancy - Puberty 5.3 Health-related behavior - alcohol consumption, smoking, medication, medical checkups - sexual behavior 6. Deviant behavior and behavioral problems 6.1 Internalizing - Emotional symptoms, problems with peers, social difficulties 6.2 Externalizing - Hyperactivity, attention problems, behavioral difficulties 6.3 Deviant and delinquent behavior - Occurrence and frequency of problematic behavior (e.g., fare evasion, skip school, drug use, thieving, property damage, physical assault) - Supplementary questions on e.g., impulse control and rebellious behavior - Short version of deviant/delinquent behavior measure 7. Demographics 7.1 Information on household - Household questionnaire (persons in the household, household grid, type of dwelling, income), information on assets 8. Environment 8.1 Activities with children - Occurrence and frequency of e.g., singing and making music together; story time; doing sports; cultural activities 8.2 Nursery - Detailed information on nursery and daycare institutions 8.3 Grand-parents - Relationship: contact frequency, quality of relationship 8.4 Parenting style - Monitoring, warmth, rules, negative communication, control (child and parent report on parental behavior) 8.5 Quality of home environment - Characteristics of a chaotic, disorganized, and hurried home - Interviewer ratings on the home environment (household) 8.6 Involvement - Autonomy, structure, control, emotional support 8.7 Sibling relationship - Warmth, conflict, rivalry of sibling relationship - Affection, hostility, rivalry of sibling relationship 8.8 Family stresses - Care burden on household level 8.9 Intentional level to achieve certain life events 8.10 Stays abroad 8.11 Information on twins´ children 9. Zygosity and twin specific items 9.1 Zygosity - Ratings of physical twin similarity in childhood (e.g., eye color, hair structure, time of getting first teeth) 9.2 Twin specific questions - E.g., same or different clothing, confusion of the twins, undertakings with twins 10. Covid-19 supplementary surveys 10.1 Health during the COVID-19 pandemic 10.2 socioeconomic changes 10.3 Covid-19-related behavior change 10.4 resilience, coping 10.5 perceived threat, stress and strain, psychological impairment 10.6 assessment of government restrictions. TwinLife ist eine auf zwölf Jahre angelegte repräsentative verhaltensgenetische Studie zur Entwicklung von sozialen Ungleichheiten. Für eine detaillierte Studien-Dokumention besuchen Sie bitte https://www.twin-life.de/documentation/ . Das Langfristvorhaben begann im Jahr 2014 und befragt in einem jährlichen Turnus über 4000 in Deutschland lebende Zwillingspaare und deren Familien zu unterschiedlichen Lebensbereichen. Durch den Vergleich von ein- und zweieiigen, gleichgeschlechtlichen Zwillingspaaren können neben sozialen Mechanismen auch genetische Differenzen zwischen Individuen, sowie die Kovariation und Interaktion sozialer und genetischer Einflussgrößen analysiert werden. Um die individuelle Entwicklung unterschiedlicher Einflussfaktoren zu dokumentieren werden die Familien über mehrere Jahre hinweg umfassend untersucht. Inhaltlich wird dabei auf sechs für soziale Ungleichheiten bedeutsame Lebensbereiche fokussiert: 1. Bildung und Kompetenzerwerb, 2. Karriere und Erfolg auf dem Arbeitsmarkt, 3. Integration und Teilhabe am sozialen, kulturellen und politischen Leben, 4. Lebensqualität und wahrgenommene Handlungsmöglichkeiten, 5. physische und psychologische Gesundheit sowie 6. Verhaltensprobleme und abweichendes Verhalten. In 2020 und 2021 fanden drei zusätzliche Befragungen zu den Einflüssen und Folgen der COVID-19-Pandemie statt. Die erste Zusatzerhebung hatte zum Ziel, retrospektiv das Verhalten, die Einstellungen, Belastungen, Gesundheit und sozioökonomische Veränderungen im Leben der Befragten während der ersten Welle der COVID-19-Pandemie von März 2020 bis hin zu den ersten Lockerungen der Lockdown-Maßnahmen zu erfassen. Die zweite Zusatzbefragung zielte darauf ab, aktuelle Verhaltensweisen, Einstellungen, Belastungen, gesundheitliche und sozioökonomische Veränderungen während der COVID-19-Pandemie zu erfassen. Die dritte ergänzende COVID-19-Umfrage befasste sich mit aktuellen Einstellungen, Belastungen, gesundheitlichen und sozioökonomischen Veränderungen aufgrund der COVID-19-Pandemie. Folgend werden die in den TwinLife-Daten erfassten Information aufgeteilt nach den skizzierten Lebensbereichen etwas genauer umschrieben: 1. Bildung und Kompetenzerwerb: Hier werden neben kognitiven Fähigkeiten, Persönlichkeitsmerkmalen und deren Entwicklung auch Informationen zu Zeugnisnoten, zur Bildungsmotivation und zum Bildungsniveau erhoben. Involvement Schule: Erwartungen der Eltern zu Lernanstrengung, Enttäuschung der Eltern bei schlechten Schulleistungen, emotionale Unterstützung der Eltern, Autonomie (z.B. Eltern ermutigen zu Nachfragen), Kontrolle (z.B. Eltern schimpfen bei schlechten Noten, drohen mit Strafen), Selbsteinschätzung der Fähigkeiten im Lesen, Kenntnis der Buchstaben im Alphabet, Wortschatz, Lesen der Uhr, Kenntnis verschiedener Formen, Zählen, Kenntnis vieler Zahlen; intrinsische Motivation Schule; Schulklima und Leistungsdruck; höchster Schulabschluss; Schulform der letzten Schule (Befragte ohne Abschluss); Jahr des Verlassens der allgemeinbildenden Schule (Abschlussjahr); Abschlussnote des höchsten Schulabschlusses; Ausbildungs- oder Studienabschluss; ISCED; Jahr des Ausbildungs- oder Studienabschlusses; Wiederholung einer Klassenstufe; wiederholte Klassen; Klasse übersprungen und Angabe der übersprungenen Klasse; Ausbildung bzw. Studium im Ausland; Bildungsempfehlung nach der Grundschule; Bildungsaspiration: gewünschter Schulabschluss; Wahrscheinlichkeit des gewünschten Schulabschlusses (100 %-Skala); angestrebter weiterer beruflicher Ausbildungs- oder Hochschulabschluss und Wahrscheinlichkeit des Erreichens (100 %-Skala). Aussagen über allgemeinbildende Schule: Akademisches Selbstkonzept: Selbsteinschätzung hinsichtlich der Begabung für die Schule allgemein, des Könnens und der Aufgabenbewältigung in der Schule allgemein, der Begabung für die Fächer Mathematik und Deutsch, des Könnens und der Aufgabenbewältigung in diesen Fächern; intrinsische Motivation (Freude am Lernstoff, Schule macht Spaß, Interesse am Lernstoff, Freude an Mathematik und Deutsch, Spaß an Mathematik und Deutsch, Interesse an Mathematik und Deutsch); Erwartungen an die Schule (Lernmotivation). Selbstregulierung: Selbstkontrolle; Gummibärchentest; Beständigkeit von Interessen. 2. Karriere und Erfolg auf dem Arbeitsmarkt: Dieser Bereich umfasst den aktuellen Beruf, die aktuelle berufliche Position sowie Informationen zum Einkommen (oder ggf. zum Bezug von Sozialleistungen). Zudem sind Informationen zur wahrgenommenen Arbeitsplatzsicherheit, zur Arbeitszufriedenheit und zum Arbeitsengagement enthalten. Berufliche Stellung und Charakteristika; Beschäftigungsdauer beim derzeitigen Arbeitgeber (Monat und Jahr); Öffentlichen Dienst; Zeitarbeit bzw. Leiharbeit; Art des Arbeitsvertrages; vereinbarte und tatsächliche Wochenarbeitszeit; Mini- bzw. Midi-Job; Arbeitslose wurden gefragt: Zeitpunkt der Beendigung der letzten Arbeitsstelle (Monat und Jahr), Beschäftigungsdauer beim letzten Arbeitgeber; Art der Beendigung des vorherigen Beschäftigungsverhältnisses; erforderliche Ausbildung für den Beruf; Arbeitsplatz am Wohnort; Häufigkeit Pendeln von der Hauptwohnung zum Arbeitsplatz; Entfernung des Arbeitsplatzes von der Hauptwohnung in Kilometern; Arbeitsplatzsicherheit; Wahrscheinlichkeit des Arbeitsplatzverlustes in den kommenden zwei Jahren; Jobzufriedenheit: Ausgeglichenheit zwischen eigener Leistung und Lohn am Arbeitsplatz; persönliches Bruttoeinkommen pro Monat bzw. pro Jahr (offen und kategorisiert); empfundene Einkommensgerechtigkeit in Bezug auf die eigene Tätigkeit; Einschätzung eines gerechten monatlichen Bruttoeinkommens; Autonomie bei Ausübung der Tätigkeit. Akademisches Selbstkonzept in Bezug auf den Beruf (gut im Beruf, gut im Job im Vergleich zu Kollegen, hohe Kompetenz im Job nach Einarbeitung, Zufriedenheit mit beruflicher Leistung, hohe Geschicklichkeit bei der Arbeit); Erwartungen an den Beruf (Leistungsmotivation). 3. Integration und Teilhabe am sozialen und politischen Leben: Hier werden Charakteristika zum sozialen Umfeld der Person erhoben, wie beispielsweise die Unterstützung durch Familie, Freunde und Ehepartner. Zudem sind Informationen zum sozialen und politischen Engagement sowie sozialen Ressourcen enthalten. Politik und Partizipation: Soziale Partizipation: Häufigkeit von Aktivitäten in ausgewählten Vereinen und Organisationen; eigene Funktion im Verein oder in der Gruppe; Politikinteresse; Art der politischen Aktivitäten in den letzten zwölf Monaten; eigene Wahlbeteiligung an der letzten Bundestagswahl; Wahlabsicht (Sonntagsfrage); Parteineigung; Erfahrung mit Diskriminierung; Gründe für erfahrene Diskriminierung; Belastung durch die Benachteiligung. Freunde (kennen sich untereinander, kaum Bekannte auf Geburtstagsfeiern von Freunden, enge Freunde kennen auch die Familie); Anzahl enger Freund insgesamt und außerhalb des Haushalts; für drei wichtige Personen wurde erfragt: Alter, Geschlecht, höchster Schulabschluss bzw. derzeit besuchte Schulform; häufiges Gefühl von Einsamkeit. Mediennutzung: Stunden pro Tag während einer Schul- oder Arbeitswoche und am Wochenende für Computernutzung, Internetnutzung, Computerspiele, Spielekonsolen, Fernsehen, Videos und DVDs. Religion: religiöse Zugehörigkeit; Kirchbesuche; Religiosität/Spiritualität. Kulturelles Kapital: Teilnahme an kulturellem Leben (Lesen, Hören klassischer Musik, Musikunterricht, Zugang zu Kulturgütern). 4. Lebensqualität und subjektiv wahrgenommene Lebensqualität: In diesem Bereich werden Daten zum Selbstwert und zur globalen sowie bereichsspezifischen Lebenszufriedenheit erhoben. Persönlichkeit und Selbstwahrnehmung: Selbstcharakterisierung anhand ausgewählter Eigenschaften; Selbsteinschätzung von Risikobereitschaft und Geduld; Selbstwirksamkeit; Leistungsmotivation. Zufriedenheit: Zufriedenheits-Skalometer für ausgewählte Lebensbereiche (Gesundheit, Arbeit, Einkommen, Freizeit, Familienleben, Partnerschaft, Freundes- und Bekanntenkreis); allgemeine Lebenszufriedenheit (Skala); Zufriedenheit mit der Beziehung zu Geschwister; Zufriedenheit mit der Beziehung zu Zwilling 1 und 2. Vertrauen (allgemeines Vertrauen, auf niemanden mehr Verlass, Vorsicht mit Vertrauen zu Freunden); Optimismus. Belastung und Stress: Häufigkeit von Streits mit Partner und Eltern; subjektive Wahrnehmung sowie Selbstregulierung und Stressbewältigung. Bedeutung und Verwirklichung der Lebensziele; Verarbeitungsprozesse; Mobbing in der Kindheit und Jugend. 5. Physische und psychische Gesundheit: Hier werden Einschätzungen zur allgemeinen Gesundheit, zu spezifischen Erkrankungen und zu subjektiv wahrgenommenen Beeinträchtigungen, Ergebnisse von Vorsorgeuntersuchungen (U-Hefte) sowie Angaben zum Gesundheitsverhalten bereitgestellt. Gesundheit (Befragte ab 16 Jahren): Selbsteinschätzung des Gesundheitszustand; Arztbesuche in den letzten zwölf Monaten und Häufigkeit von Arztbesuchen; Beeinträchtigung im Alltag durch Erkrankungen; festgestellte Erkrankungen (Diagnose); Zeitpunkt des Auftretens der Erkrankung; Depression; Angaben zum Rauchverhalten und Alkoholkonsum; Beeinträchtigung der Arbeit durch Alkoholkonsum; regelmäßiger Medikamentenkonsum; regelmäßige Gesundheitsvorsorge; Größe in Zentimetern; Gewicht in Kilogramm. Schwangerschaft; Pubertät; sexuelles Verhalten. 6. Verhaltensprobleme und abweichendes Verhalten: Informationen zu kriminellem Verhalten sowie zum Ausmaß an internalisiertem und externalisiertem Problemverhalten. Häufigkeit von Kopf- oder Bauchschmerzen bzw. Übelkeit, Sorgen, unglücklich oder niedergeschlagen, Nervosität in neuen Situationen, viele Ängste, häufig für sich allein, einen oder mehrere gute Freunde, beliebt bei Gleichaltrigen, gehänselt oder schikaniert von anderen, besser mit Erwachsenen auskommen, verschlossen, etc.; kriminelles Verhalten und Ausmaß an internalisiertem und externalisiertem Problemverhalten: Schwarzfahren, Schwänzen, Übernachten ohne Wissen der Familie, Stehlen, Graffiti, Vandalismus, Cyber-Mobbing, Raubkopien, Mobbing, Bedrohung, Rauchen: schon einmal geraucht; Alter beim ersten Mal Rauchen; schon öfter geraucht; Häufigkeit Rauchen; Rauchen alleine oder in einer Gruppe; Alkoholkonsum: schon einmal Alkohol getrunken; Alter beim ersten Alkoholkonsum; schon öfter Alkohol getrunken; Alkoholkonsum allein oder in einer Gruppe; jemals betrunken gewesen und Alter beim ersten Mal betrunken; Alkoholkonsum bei zu viel trinken (Anzahl der Gläser Bier, Wein, hochprozentiger alkoholische Getränke); Häufigkeit von Betrunkensein; Verletzung anderer bei Schlägerei und Häufigkeit; Verletzung bei Schlägereien allein oder in einer Gruppe; Drogenkonsum: Häufigkeit des Drogenkonsums; Alter beim ersten Drogenkonsum; Drogenkonsum allein oder in einer Gruppe; Fahren ohne Führerschein und Häufigkeit; nach Alkohol- bzw. Drogeneinfluss gefahren und Häufigkeit. 7. Zudem werden hinsichtlich der Charakteristika der Umwelt Informationen zum sozio-ökonomischen Status der Familie, zur Familienstruktur, zu den Beziehungen zwischen Familienmitgliedern, zur Haushaltszusammensetzung sowie Merkmale der Nachbarschaften erhoben. Familienbeziehungen: Detaillierte Angaben zum Umgang mit dem Zwillingsbruder bzw. der Zwillingsschwester und zum Umgang Zwilling mit anderem Geschwister; Umgang des Geschwisters mit Zwilling 1 und 2; Zufriedenheit mit der Beziehung zum anderen Zwilling und zum Geschwister; gleiche Hobbies und Interessen der Zwillinge; enges Verhältnis der Zwillinge untereinander; gemeinsame Unternehmungen; noch einmal als Zwilling leben; gute Noten für Geschwister wichtig; gewünschter Schulabschluss für Geschwister; Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass Geschwister gewünschten Schulabschluss erreicht; Beziehung zu den Eltern bzw. Stiefeltern: Erziehungsstil von Mutter bzw. Stiefmutter und von Vater bzw. Stiefvater (Zuneigung, Lob, Unterstützung, Bestrafung, Enttäuschung bei schlechtem Benehmen, Anordnungen nicht widersetzen, Anschreien, Beschimpfen, Gespräche über neue Freunde, Kennenlernen neuer Freunde, Inkonsequenz beim Strafen und bei der Einhaltung vereinbarter Regeln und Verbote). Fragen an Eltern bzw. Stiefeltern über die beiden Zwillinge und ein teilnehmendes Geschwister: Beziehung zum Kind; Häufigkeit ausgewählter Aktivitäten mit der Familie; Erwartungen an die Schule; Wichtigkeit guter Noten; Bildungsaspiration für das Kind; Wahrscheinlichkeit des gewünschten Schulabschlusses. Zwillingsrelevante Fragen an die Eltern: gleiche Kleidung für Zwillinge; Alter ab dem die Zwillinge gleich gekleidet wurden; derzeit gleiche Hobbies und Interessen; Beurteilung des Verhältnisses der Zwillinge zueinander; Verwechseln der Zwillinge. Wohnen: Zusammenleben mit den Eltern; Situation zu Hause: regelmäßiger Ablauf vor dem Zubettgehen, zu Hause keinen klaren Gedanken fassen, geht drunter und drüber, alles im Griff, ständig lief ein Fernseher, ruhige Atmosphäre). Großeltern leben noch oder verstorben; Häufigkeit von Treffen, Unternehmungen und persönlichen Gesprächen mit den Großeltern; weitere Informationen zu Großeltern; Häufigkeit ausgewählter Aktivitäten mit Familienmitgliedern; Erwartungen an die Schule; Belastung durch Pflege auf Haushaltsebene. Kontakte: Kontakt zu Personen, die nicht im Haushalt leben; Kontakthäufigkeit zu leiblichen Eltern bzw. den Zwillingen. Lebensereignisse: Auftreten und Bewertung verschiedener Lebensereignisse (z.B. Heirat, Tod, Arbeitslosigkeit) und Vorsätze zum Erreichen gewisser Ziele. Kritische Übergänge: Auftreten und Bewertung verschiedener wichtiger Übergänge und Entwicklungen im Leben, z.B. Einschulung, Auslandsaufenthalt, Eintritt in den Arbeitsmarkt, Paarbeziehung, etc.); Auftreten und Bewertung von geteilten und unterschiedlichen Ereignissen im Leben der Zwillinge sowie Informationen zu den Kindern der Zwillinge. 8. Demographie: Beziehung des Befragten zu den Zwillingen; Alter der Zwillinge, Geschwister und Eltern (Geburtsmonat und Geburtsjahr); Geschlecht des Befragen; Geschlecht des Zwillingspärchens; Anzahl der Personen, die zur Familie gehören, Anzahl der Haushalte, die zur Familie gehören; Familienstand; feste Partnerschaft; Geschlecht des Partners; Schulbesuch; Arbeit neben der Schule; Wochenstunden im Schülerjob und Stundenlohn; Erwerbstätigkeit; Mutterschutz bzw. Elternzeit; arbeitslos gemeldet, in Ausbildung; Art der Ausbildung; Art der Hochschulausbildung; Art der Weiterbildung; Art der beruflichen Ausbildung; Art der Erwerbstätigkeit; besuchte Schulform und Klassenstufe; Bundesland der Schule; Migrationshintergrund: Geburtsland; Jahr des Zuzugs nach Deutschland; Geburtsland von Mutter und Vater; Staatsangehörigkeit; deutsche Staatsangehörigkeit seit Geburt bzw. Jahr des Erwerbs der deutschen Staatsbürgerschaft; Aufenthaltsstatus; Sprache zuhause. 9. Fragebogen Frühkindliche Betreuung und Schulbesuch der Zwillinge: detaillierte Angaben zur Betreuungssituation der Kinder von der Geburt bis zum Schuleintritt (Betreuungspersonen, Betreuungseinrichtung (Gruppengröße, Anzahl der Betreuungspersonen insgesamt sowie der Betreuer ohne Ausbildung); Teilnahmehäufigkeit an ausgewählten Aktivitäten in KITA oder im Kindergarten (z.B. musikalische Früherziehung, Malen, künstlerische Aktivitäten, etc.); Schulbesuch: Schulform; Klasse; Bundesland des Schulbesuchs; Teilnahme an außerschulischen Aktivitäten (z.B. Hausaufgabenbetreuung, AGs, etc.); Klasse wiederholt; wiederholte Klasse; Überspringen einer Klassenstufe; Bildungsempfehlung; Leitbild der KITA vorhanden; Zufriedenheit mit der Betreuungseinrichtung; gemeinsame oder getrennte Betreuung der Zwillinge in den ersten sechs Lebensjahren; Besuch der gleichen Schulklasse und gleichen Schule bzw. getrennte Klassen oder unterschiedliche Schulen; falls unterschiedliche Klassenstufen besucht wurden: erstgeborener oder zweitgeborener Zwilling in der höheren Klassenstufe; bis zum 18. Lebensjahr gemeinsam aufgewachsen bzw. Lebensjahre des getrennt Aufwachsens; Betreuungsperson des erstgeborenen und des zweitgeborenen Zwillings in dieser Zeit; detaillierte Angaben zur Betreuungssituation des Geschwisterkindes von der Geburt bis zum Schuleintritt und zum Schulbesuch. 10. In den Corona-Zusatzbefragungen wurden folgende Bereiche thematisiert: Gesundheit während der COVID-19-Pandemie; sozioökonomische Veränderungen; COVID-19-bezogene Verhaltensänderungen, Resilienz, Bewältigung; wahrgenommene Bedrohung, Stress und Belastung, psychische Beeinträchtigung; Bewertung der staatlichen Einschränkungen. Probability: MultistageProbability.Multistage Wahrscheinlichkeitsauswahl: Mehrstufige ZufallsauswahlProbability.Multistage Face-to-face interview: Computer-assisted (CAPI/CAMI)Interview.FaceToFace.CAPIorCAMI Persönliches Interview : Computerunterstützte Befragung (CAPI/CAMI)Interview.FaceToFace.CAPIorCAMI Self-administered questionnaire: Computer-assisted (CASI)SelfAdministeredQuestionnaire.CASI Selbstausgefüllter Fragebogen: Computerunterstützt (CASI)SelfAdministeredQuestionnaire.CASI Self-administered questionnaire: PaperSelfAdministeredQuestionnaire.Paper Selbstausgefüllter Fragebogen: PapierSelfAdministeredQuestionnaire.Paper Educational measurements and testsMeasurementsAndTests.Educational Messungen und Tests: Leistungs- und KompetenztestsMeasurementsAndTests.Educational RecordingRecording Aufzeichnung (mechanisch/elektronisch)Recording Self-administered questionnaire: Web-based (CAWI)SelfAdministeredQuestionnaire.CAWI Selbstausgefüllter Fragebogen: Webbasiert (CAWI)SelfAdministeredQuestionnaire.CAWI Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)Interview.Telephone.CATI Telefonisches Interview: Computerunterstützte Befragung (CATI)Interview.Telephone.CATI

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  • Authors: Office for National Statistics;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS.The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973-1983, then annually between 1984 and 1991, comprising a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter. From 1992 it moved to a quarterly cycle with a sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. Northern Ireland was also included in the survey from December 1994. Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.The UK Data Service also holds a Secure Access version of the QLFS (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; LFS datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned (the latest questionnaire available covers July-September 2022). Volumes are updated periodically, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis. This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.LFS response to COVID-19From April 2020 to May 2022, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata were made available to cover the pandemic period. The first additional microdata to be released covered February to April 2020 and the final non-calendar dataset covered March-May 2022. Publication then returned to calendar quarters only. Within the additional non-calendar COVID-19 quarters, pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables may not be available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. The income weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-calendar quarters, although the person weight (PWT) is included. Please consult the documentation for full details.Occupation data for 2021 and 2022 data filesThe ONS has identified an issue with the collection of some occupational data in 2021 and 2022 data files in a number of their surveys. While they estimate any impacts will be small overall, this will affect the accuracy of the breakdowns of some detailed (four-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)) occupations, and data derived from them. Further information can be found in the ONS article published on 11 July 2023: Revision of miscoded occupational data in the ONS Labour Force Survey, UK: January 2021 to September 2022.2022 WeightingThe population totals used for the latest LFS estimates use projected growth rates from Real Time Information (RTI) data for UK, EU and non-EU populations based on 2021 patterns. The total population used for the LFS therefore does not take into account any changes in migration, birth rates, death rates, and so on since June 2021, and hence levels estimates may be under- or over-estimating the true values and should be used with caution. Estimates of rates will, however, be robust.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataTwo versions of the QLFS are available from UKDS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Four sampling frames are used. See documentation for details. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview The first interview is conducted face-to-face, and subsequent interviews by telephone where possible.

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  • Authors: NatCen Social Research;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey series began in 1983. The series is designed to produce annual measures of attitudinal movements to complement large-scale government surveys that deal largely with facts and behaviour patterns, and the data on party political attitudes produced by opinion polls. One of the BSA's main purposes is to allow the monitoring of patterns of continuity and change, and the examination of the relative rates at which attitudes, in respect of a range of social issues, change over time. Some questions are asked regularly, others less often. Funding for BSA comes from a number of sources (including government departments, the Economic and Social Research Council and other research foundations), but the final responsibility for the coverage and wording of the annual questionnaires rests with NatCen Social Research (formerly Social and Community Planning Research). The BSA has been conducted every year since 1983, except in 1988 and 1992 when core funding was devoted to the British Election Study (BES).Further information about the series and links to publications may be found on the NatCen Social Research British Social Attitudes webpage. BSA 2021The 2021 BSA survey used a mixed-mode push-to-web design with an optional Computer-Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) opt-in. Letters were sent to a random sample of addresses inviting up to two household members to complete the survey online, with an option to be interviewed by phone if preferred. This is the same design used for the 2020 BSA. Before 2020, BSA was a face-to-face survey, but this was changed due to the public health measures introduced in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The full BSA 2021 report, Broken Britain? Public attitudes in an era of crisis is available from the NatCen Social Research website. Main Topics:Each year, the BSA interview questionnaire contains a number of 'core' questions, which are repeated in most years. In addition, a wide range of background and classificatory questions is included. The remainder of the questionnaire is devoted to a series of questions (modules) on a range of social, economic, political and moral issues - some are asked regularly, others less often. Cross-indexes of those questions asked more than once appear in the reports. In 2021 the questionnaire included the following topics: Household Composition, Employment, Politics, Welfare, Benefits and Income, National Identity and Ethnicity, Religion, Disability, Education, EU Referendum and the General Election, Benefits and Income, Spending and Governance, Immigration, Equal Opportunities, Identity and Britishness, Work and Health, Child Maintenance, Digital, Work and COVID-19, Pensions and Retirement, Sexual Relationships, Parental Leave, Disability, Mental Health and the Workplace, Social Mobility, Social Class, Satisfaction with Health and Care Services, Health and Care Spending, NHS Priorities and Principles, New Home Building, Buying or Renting a Home, COVID-19 and the Home. Multi-stage stratified random sample See documentation for each BSA year for full details. Self-administered questionnaire: Web-based (CAWI) Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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  • Authors: Entwistle, V, University of Aberdeen; Riley, J, University of Aberdeen; Arnason, A, University of Aberdeen; Maccagno, P, University of Aberdeen;

    The Care in Funerals project drew upon 67 semi-structured qualitative interviews with 68 individuals who had been bereaved, and/or worked or volunteered in deathcare and funeral provision in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interviews explored their experiences during the pandemic, evaluations of what was good and what was less good, how they responded, and suggestions of what might be improved going forward. They also examined what interviewees understood by the term 'care' in relation to funerals. All participants gave informed consent to participate. Interviews had a mean length of one hour, and were conducted using video calling software or, in some cases, telephone, between April 2021 and April 2022. This dataset consists of 63 transcripts (two interviewees were interviewed together in one case) all of which have had identifying details removed such that the participants cannot be identified. Four transcripts have been withheld as permission was not granted by participants for their inclusion in a data repository.Funeral provision in the UK was significantly disrupted when COVID-19 infection control policies constrained how and by whom bodies could be attended to and moved to burial/cremation sites; how funeral directors and celebrants could communicate with bereaved families; and possibilities for gathering for funerals, mourning and memorialising activities. The regulations generated significant distress and perceptions of injustice. They also prompted the development of new funeral practices - inviting important questions about funeral provision. Our interdisciplinary research starts from a recognition of funeral provision as a form of care (and set of caring practices) oriented towards people who have died and their bereaved family, friends and communities. It addresses neglected ethical aspects of funeral provision, including, in the context of COVID-19, questions of fairness and the moral dimensions of distress evident in family members' and funeral directors' worries about not fulfilling important responsibilities, or doing wrong, to those who have died or been bereaved. Our ethical analyses will be grounded in an ethnographic examination of changed practices and experiences that includes: (1) analysis of funeral artefacts, including online films, tribute pages, and written accounts; (2) interviews with diverse bereaved family members, funeral directors and celebrants. We will attend carefully to what people consider good and right (or not) and why in different circumstances. We will develop practical ethical analyses of post-death care that address tensions between different purposes of funerals and diverse perspectives on post-death responsibilities. Discussion events with key stakeholders will inform the development of resources for future policy and practice. Those who expressed interest were sent participant information and a consent form and offered an opportunity to discuss the study before deciding whether to take part. Interviews took place online or by telephone. We received informed consent verbally (recorded) or in writing (by email). Four researchers conducted the interviews, using shared topic guides. After broad opening questions, they followed participants’ conversational leads while covering key topics, including their experiences of funerals during the pandemic, what they felt was challenging about these funerals, and what made a funeral ‘good’. Interviewers wrote fieldnotes summarising the interview, noting key impressions and capturing any information provided ‘off tape.’ Interviews were transcribed verbatim by an external company, then checked for accuracy and anonymised by members of the research team.

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  • Authors: Department for Work and Pensions;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Family Resources Survey (FRS) has been running continuously since 1992 to meet the information needs of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). It is almost wholly funded by DWP. The FRS collects information from a large, and representative sample of private households in the United Kingdom (prior to 2002, it covered Great Britain only). The interview year runs from April to March.The focus of the survey is on income, and how much comes from the many possible sources (such as employee earnings, self-employed earnings or profits from businesses, and dividends; individual pensions; state benefits, including Universal Credit and the State Pension; and other sources such as savings and investments). Specific items of expenditure, such as rent or mortgage, Council Tax and water bills, are also covered.Many other topics are covered and the dataset has a very wide range of personal characteristics, at the adult or child, family and then household levels. These include education, caring, childcare and disability. The dataset also captures material deprivation, household food security and (new for 2021/22) household food bank usage. The FRS is a national statistic whose results are published on the gov.uk website. It is also possible to create your own tables from FRS data, using DWP’s Stat Xplore tool. Further information can be found on the gov.uk Family Resources Survey webpage. Safe Room Access FRS data In addition to the standard End User Licence (EUL) version, Safe Room access datasets, containing unrounded data and additional variables, are also available for FRS from 2005/06 onwards - see SN 7196, where the extra contents are listed. The Safe Room version also includes secure access versions of the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) and Pensioners' Incomes (PI) datasets. The Safe Room access data are currently only available to UK HE/FE applicants and for access at the UK Data Archive's Safe Room at the University of Essex, Colchester. Prospective users of the Safe Room access version of the FRS/HBAI/PI will need to fulfil additional requirements beyond those associated with the EUL datasets. Full details of the application requirements are available from Guidance on applying for the Family Resources Survey: Secure Access.FRS, HBAI and PIThe FRS underpins the related Households Below Average Income (HBAI) dataset, which focuses on poverty in the UK, and the related Pensioners' Incomes (PI) dataset. The EUL versions of HBAI and PI are held under SNs 5828 and 8503 respectively. The secure access versions are held within the Safe Room FRS study under SN 7196 (see above). Latest version informationIn June 2023, two changes were made to the 'HOUSEHOL' file. The variable BEDROOM6 was replaced with an updated version, and a new variable, CTAMTBND (Annual council tax payment bands), was added. The Excel Variable Listing document was updated accordingly. Main Topics: Household characteristics (family composition, tenure); COVID-19, housing costs including rent or details of mortgage; household bills including Council Tax, buildings and contents insurance, water and sewerage rates; receipt of state support from all state benefits, including Universal Credit and Tax Credits; household food security and household food bank usage; educational level and grants and loans; children in education; care, both those receiving care and those caring for others; childcare; occupation, employment, self-employment and earnings/wage details; income tax payments and refunds; National Insurance contributions; earnings from odd jobs; health, restrictions on work, children's health, and disability or limiting long-standing illness; personal and occupational pension schemes; income from pensions and trusts, royalties and allowances, and other sources; children's earnings; interest and dividends from investments including National Savings products, stocks and shares; and total household assets. Multi-stage stratified random sample Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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  • Authors: Office for National Statistics;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The Annual Population Survey, also held at the UK Data Archive, is derived from the LFS.The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973-1983, then annually between 1984 and 1991, comprising a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter. From 1992 it moved to a quarterly cycle with a sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. Northern Ireland was also included in the survey from December 1994. Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.The UK Data Service also holds a Secure Access version of the QLFS (see below); household datasets; two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; LFS datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each user guide volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned (the latest questionnaire available covers July-September 2022). Volumes are updated periodically, so users are advised to check the latest documents on the ONS Labour Force Survey - User Guidance pages before commencing analysis. This is especially important for users of older QLFS studies, where information and guidance in the user guide documents may have changed over time.LFS response to COVID-19From April 2020 to May 2022, additional non-calendar quarter LFS microdata were made available to cover the pandemic period. The first additional microdata to be released covered February to April 2020 and the final non-calendar dataset covered March-May 2022. Publication then returned to calendar quarters only. Within the additional non-calendar COVID-19 quarters, pseudonymised variables Casenop and Hserialp may contain a significant number of missing cases (set as -9). These variables may not be available in full for the additional COVID-19 datasets until the next standard calendar quarter is produced. The income weight variable, PIWT, is not available in the non-calendar quarters, although the person weight (PWT) is included. Please consult the documentation for full details.Occupation data for 2021 and 2022 data filesThe ONS has identified an issue with the collection of some occupational data in 2021 and 2022 data files in a number of their surveys. While they estimate any impacts will be small overall, this will affect the accuracy of the breakdowns of some detailed (four-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)) occupations, and data derived from them. Further information can be found in the ONS article published on 11 July 2023: Revision of miscoded occupational data in the ONS Labour Force Survey, UK: January 2021 to September 2022.2022 WeightingThe population totals used for the latest LFS estimates use projected growth rates from Real Time Information (RTI) data for UK, EU and non-EU populations based on 2021 patterns. The total population used for the LFS therefore does not take into account any changes in migration, birth rates, death rates, and so on since June 2021, and hence levels estimates may be under- or over-estimating the true values and should be used with caution. Estimates of rates will, however, be robust.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS dataTwo versions of the QLFS are available from UKDS. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. The EUL version includes country and Government Office Region geography, 3-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and 3-digit industry group for main, second and last job (from July-September 2015, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only).The Secure Access version contains more detailed variables relating to: age: single year of age, year and month of birth, age completed full-time education and age obtained highest qualification, age of oldest dependent child and age of youngest dependent child family unit and household: including a number of variables concerning the number of dependent children in the family according to their ages, relationship to head of household and relationship to head of family nationality and country of origin finer detail geography: including county, unitary/local authority, place of work, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions, and whether lives and works in same local authority district, and other categories; health: including main health problem, and current and past health problems education and apprenticeship: including numbers and subjects of various qualifications and variables concerning apprenticeships industry: including industry, industry class and industry group for main, second and last job, and industry made redundant from occupation: including 5-digit industry subclass and 4-digit SOC for main, second and last job and job made redundant from system variables: including week number when interview took place and number of households at address other additional detailed variables may also be included. The Secure Access datasets (SNs 6727 and 7674) have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. Main Topics:The QLFS questionnaire comprises a 'core' of questions which are included in every survey, together with some 'non-core' questions which vary from quarter to quarter.The questionnaire can be split into two main parts. The first part contains questions on the respondent's household, family structure, basic housing information and demographic details of household members. The second part contains questions covering economic activity, education and health, and also may include a few questions asked on behalf of other government departments (for example the Department for Work and Pensions and the Home Office). Until 1997, the questions on health covered mainly problems which affected the respondent's work. From that quarter onwards, the questions cover all health problems. Detailed questions on income have also been included in each quarter since 1993. The basic questionnaire is revised each year, and a new version published, along with a transitional version that details changes from the previous year's questionnaire. Four sampling frames are used. See documentation for details. Face-to-face interview Telephone interview The first interview is conducted face-to-face, and subsequent interviews by telephone where possible.

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  • Authors: Hanson, T., City University, Department of Sociology; Fitzgerald, R.; Comanaru, R., City University;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. This dataset is the result of an experimental fielding of the Round 11 European Social Survey (ESS) as a self-completion (web and paper) survey in Great Britain. Data collection was carried out between November 2021 and March 2022. The total number of cases included in the data file is 2,908. This includes fully completed questionnaires and those where at least 75% of 'ask all' questions were answered. 2,116 responses were via web and 792 were on paper. The response rate was between 36% and 40%, depending on which assumption is applied regarding ineligible cases (see the technical report for further details). The experiment also included an incentive experiment, with different levels of conditional incentive randomly assigned to sample units. The incentive condition is flagged in the data file. It is expected that users may compare this data with the UK ESS Round 10 data (based on a face-to-face approach), which is expected to be released via the ESS Data Archive in early 2023. Main Topics: The European Social Survey (ESS) is a general social survey, which covers public attitudes and behaviour across a range of topic areas. It is divided into a core section (that is repeated for all survey rounds) and two rotating modules (that vary between rounds). The topics covered by the core include media use, internet use, social trust, political interest, trust in institutions, civic participation, voting and political party allegiance, subjective wellbeing, crime, religion, discrimination and identity. For Round 11 of the survey (on which this data set is based), the two rotating modules were "Understandings and Evaluations of Democracy" and "Digital Social Contacts in Work and Family Life". The survey includes an extensive social-demographics section, collecting information on the respondent, their partner and their parents. The Round 11 survey also includes a module on experiences of and attitudes towards the COVID-19 pandemic. Multi-stage stratified random sample Self-administered questionnaire: Web-based (CAWI) Self-administered questionnaire: Paper

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  • Authors: Office for National Statistics;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Alongside the usual Classification questions, this study includes the following non-core OPN modules:MAZ Internet Access module, run in January, February and April 2018 (also includes questions on Citizenship (passports), and Higher Education (whether respondent has a degree). This module was conducted on behalf of ONS and covers internet use for work, leisure, purchasing, banking, and other services, via computers, mobile devices and smartphones.MAK Train Satisfaction module, run in February 2018. This module was conducted on behalf of the Department for Transport and covers short- and long-distance train travel and opinions on various aspects of train services. (This module was previously held separately under SN 8576, which is no longer available.) Main Topics: Internet access and use, train travel and satisfaction with rail services, citizenship, higher education, and other demographics. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

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  • Authors: Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The English Housing Survey (EHS) is a continuous national survey commissioned by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) that collects information about people's housing circumstances and the condition and energy efficiency of housing in England. The EHS brings together two previous survey series into a single fieldwork operation: the English House Condition Survey (EHCS) (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33158) and the Survey of English Housing (SEH) (available under GN 33277). The EHS covers all housing tenures and provides valuable information and evidence to inform the development and monitoring of the department's housing policies. Results from the survey are also used by a wide range of other users including other government departments, local authorities, housing associations, landlords, academics, construction industry professionals, consultants, and the general public. The EHS has a complex multi-stage methodology consisting of two main elements; an initial interview survey of around 14,000 households and a follow-up physical inspection. Some further elements are also periodically included in or derived from the EHS: for 2008 and 2009, a desk-based market valuation was conducted of a sub-sample of 8,000 dwellings (including vacant ones), but this was not carried out from 2010 onwards. A periodic follow-up survey of private landlords and agents (the Private Landlords Survey (PLS)) is conducted using information from the EHS interview survey. Fuel Poverty datasets are also available from 2003, created by the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The EHS interview survey sample formed part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) (available from the Archive under GN 33420) from April 2008 to April 2011. During this period the core questions from the IHS formed part of the EHS questionnaire. End User Licence and Special Licence Versions: From 2014 data onwards, the End User Licence (EUL) versions of the EHS only include derived variables. In addition the number of variables on the EUL datasets from that date has been reduced and disclosure control increased on certain remaining variables. The new Special Licence versions of the EHS, which are subject to more restrictive access conditions, are of a similar nature to EHS EUL datasets prior to 2014 and include both derived and raw datasets. Further information about the EHS and the latest news, reports and tables can be found on the GOV.UK English Housing Survey web pages. The English Housing Survey, 2020: Housing Stock Data includes data from a two-year rolling sample with the appropriate two-year weights, and covers the period April 2019 to March 2021.Fieldwork was suspended between April and June 2020 because of restrictions introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic and, for the same reason, carrying out face-to-face fieldwork was not possible for the remainder of the year. The EHS was therefore carried out over a reduced fieldwork period between July, 2020 and April, 2021 using a 'push-to-telephone' approach and an 'external plus' physical survey where internal inspections of properties were replaced with external inspections, where the inspection was restricted to an assessment of the exterior of the dwelling and supplemented by information about the interior of the dwelling the surveyor collected (socially distanced) at the doorstep.Some of the raw data required for modelling could not be collected, in which case predictive modelled estimates at dwelling level were produced to indicate whether or not a dwelling: had damp problems; had any Category 1 hazards assessed through the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS); or met the Decent Homes Standard. Main Topics: The EHS Housing survey consists of two components:Interview Survey on the Participating HouseholdAn interview is first conducted with the householder. The interview topics include: household characteristics, satisfaction with the home and the area, disability and adaptations to the home, ownership and rental details and income details. All interviewees are guaranteed confidentiality and all data is anonymised.Physical Survey on the Housing StockA visual inspection of both the interior and exterior of the dwelling is carried out by a qualified surveyor to assess the condition and energy efficiency of the dwelling. Topics covered include whether the dwelling meets the Decent Homes Standard; cost to make the dwelling decent; existence of damp and Category 1 Hazards as measured by the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS); Energy Efficiency Rating. The physical survey is carried out on the dwelling of a sub-sample of the participants of the interview survey. The sub-sample consists of the dwelling of participants living in private or social rented properties and a sub-sample of those in owner occupied properties. A proportion of dwelling found to be vacant during the interview survey are also included in physical survey. An 'external plus' physical survey was completed during the COVID-19 pandemic due to restrictions.This dataset contains data from the households who have taken part in both the interview and physical surveys. The Interview survey data on their own are available in a separate study (the Household Data available from the UK Data Archive under SN 9077). Multi-stage stratified random sample Visual inspection of the fabric of the dwelling Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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  • Authors: Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The English Housing Survey (EHS) is a continuous national survey commissioned by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) that collects information about people's housing circumstances and the condition and energy efficiency of housing in England. The EHS brings together two previous survey series into a single fieldwork operation: the English House Condition Survey (EHCS) (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33158) and the Survey of English Housing (SEH) (available under GN 33277). The EHS covers all housing tenures and provides valuable information and evidence to inform the development and monitoring of the department's housing policies. Results from the survey are also used by a wide range of other users including other government departments, local authorities, housing associations, landlords, academics, construction industry professionals, consultants, and the general public. The EHS has a complex multi-stage methodology consisting of two main elements; an initial interview survey of around 14,000 households and a follow-up physical inspection. Some further elements are also periodically included in or derived from the EHS: for 2008 and 2009, a desk-based market valuation was conducted of a sub-sample of 8,000 dwellings (including vacant ones), but this was not carried out from 2010 onwards. A periodic follow-up survey of private landlords and agents (the Private Landlords Survey (PLS)) is conducted using information from the EHS interview survey. Fuel Poverty datasets are also available from 2003, created by the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The EHS interview survey sample formed part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) (available from the Archive under GN 33420) from April 2008 to April 2011. During this period the core questions from the IHS formed part of the EHS questionnaire. End User Licence and Special Licence Versions: From 2014 data onwards, the End User Licence (EUL) versions of the EHS only include derived variables. In addition the number of variables on the EUL datasets from that date has been reduced and disclosure control increased on certain remaining variables. The new Special Licence versions of the EHS, which are subject to more restrictive access conditions, are of a similar nature to EHS EUL datasets prior to 2014 and include both derived and raw datasets. Further information about the EHS and the latest news, reports and tables can be found on the GOV.UK English Housing Survey web pages. The English Housing Survey, 2020-21 data was collected during the COVID-19 pandemic which necessitated a change in the established survey mode. Fieldwork was suspended between April and June 2020 and carrying out face-to-face fieldwork was not possible for the remainder of the year. The EHS was therefore carried out over a reduced fieldwork period between July, 2020 and April, 2021 using a 'push-to-telephone' approach and an 'external plus' physical survey where internal inspections of properties were replaced with external inspections, where the inspection was restricted to an assessment of the exterior of the dwelling and supplemented by information about the interior of the dwelling the surveyor collected (socially distanced) at the doorstep.Some of the raw data required for modelling could not be collected, in which case predictive modelled estimates at dwelling level were produced to indicate whether or not a dwelling: had damp problems; had any Category 1 hazards assessed through the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS); or met the Decent Homes Standard. Main Topics: The EHS Housing survey consists of two components:Interview Survey on the Participating HouseholdAn interview is first conducted with the householder. The interview topics include: household characteristics, satisfaction with the home and the area, disability and adaptations to the home, ownership and rental details and income details. All interviewees are guaranteed confidentiality and all data is anonymised.Physical Survey on the Housing StockAs detailed above, an 'external plus' physical survey was completed during the COVID-19 pandemic due to restrictions.This dataset contains data from the interview survey only. The data from the physical survey are available in a separate study (the Housing Stock Dataset available from the UK Data Archive under SN 9076). Multi-stage stratified random sample Telephone interview: Computer-assisted (CATI)

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  • Authors: Diewald, Martin; Kandler, Christian; Riemann, Rainer; Spinath, Frank M.; +31 Authors

    TwinLife is a 12-year representative behavior genetic study investigating the emergence and development of social inequalities over the life course. For a detailed documentation of the study please visit https://www.twin-life.de/documentation/ . The long-term project began in 2014 and surveys more than 4,000 pairs of twins and their families in different stages of life on a yearly basis. All of the subjects reside in Germany. Not only social, but also genetic mechanisms as well as covariations and interactions between these two factors can be examined with the help of identical and fraternal same-sex twins. In order to document the individual development of different aspects it is important to examine the families extensively over the course of several years. Six important contextual domains are focused on: 1. Education and academic performance / skill development, 2. career and labor market attainment, 3. integration and participation in social, cultural and political life, 4. quality of life and perceived capabilities, 5. physical and psychological health and 6. behavioral problems and deviant behavior. In 2020 and 2021, three supplementary surveys on the influences and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic took place. The first supplemental survey aimed to retrospectively capture the behavior, attitudes, stresses, health, and socioeconomic changes during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic from March 2020 through the first relaxations of the lockdown measures. The second supplemental survey aimed to assess current behaviors, attitudes, stresses, health, and socioeconomic changes during the COVID-19 pandemic. The third supplemental COVID-19 survey aimed to capture current attitudes, stresses, health, and socioeconomic changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the following, the TwinLife Data are described in more detail by the life domains outlined above: 1. Skill formation and education 1.1 Educational success: - School report; if not available: supplementary questions - Current school marks or rather marks of highest graduation - School climate/student-teacher-interaction - Pressure and stress at school 1.2 Intelligence - Subtests Matrices, Series, and Classification - Subtests Matrices, Series, Reasoning, Classification 1.3 Cognitive development - General information derived from ´U-Heft´; if not available: supplementary questions - Interviewer rating on task orientation and oral skills following intelligence test - Tutoring and homework help/special educational treatment/attendance of special school - Competence rating of social skills, oral skills, concentration ability, communications skills, mathematic ability, general knowledge 1.4 Media use - Frequency and duration of media use (e.g., Internet, Laptop, TV, games console etc.) 1.5 Academic self-concept - Verbal and spatial skills, spatial and general - Verbal, mathematic, and general academic ability - Perceived competence 1.6 Intrinsic motivation, learning motivation, achievement motivation - Educational values of German, maths, and school in general - Learning and achievement motivation in German, maths, and school in general - Learning goals 1.7 Self-efficacy - General self-efficacy 1.8 Self-esteem - General self-esteem 1.9 Self-regulation - Consistency of interest, self-control - Gummy bear test 1.10 Personality - Neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, conscientiousness 2. Career and labor market attainment 2.1 Employment status - Current employment status/changes regarding employment 2.2 Education - History of education - Education and qualification - Educational and career aspirations 2.3 Information on current job - Perceived job security and satisfaction - Wages/income/welfare dependency - job-related burden (i.e. shiftwork) 2.4 Economic preferences - Risk aversion 2.5 Job autonomy 3. Integration and participation in social, cultural, and political life 3.1 Migration background and citizenship - Current status of citizenship and changes of citizenship - Migration 3.2 Discrimination - Experiences with discrimination 3.3 Social participation - Frequency of attendance in sports clubs, theatre, music groups or volunteer organizations 3.4 Social networks - Social capital of individuals, e.g., close friends, frequency of social contacts - Loneliness 3.5 Political participation - Interest in politics, political preferences, voting behavior 3.6 Religion - Religious affiliation, church attendance, religiosity/spirituality 3.7 Cultural capital - cultural participation, reading, clasical music - Availability of cultural property - Music lessons 4. Subjective perceptions of quality of life 4.1 Life satisfaction - Global life satisfaction - Domain satisfaction (health, work life, family life, leisure time, school, romantic relationship, friendships, income) - Satisfaction with sibling relationship - Optimism 4.2 Burden and stress - frequency of arguments with partner or parents - Stress regulation and coping - interfamiliar and extrafamiliar: subjective evaluation 4.3 Life Goals: importance and progress 4.4 Sensory-processing sensitivity 4.5 Bullying - in the childhood and adolescence 5. Physical and psychological health 5.1 Subjective health 5.2 Objective health and diagnosis - Measures of height and weight child´s medical records - Depression - Pregnancy - Puberty 5.3 Health-related behavior - alcohol consumption, smoking, medication, medical checkups - sexual behavior 6. Deviant behavior and behavioral problems 6.1 Internalizing - Emotional symptoms, problems with peers, social difficulties 6.2 Externalizing - Hyperactivity, attention problems, behavioral difficulties 6.3 Deviant and delinquent behavior - Occurrence and frequency of problematic behavior (e.g., fare evasion, skip school, drug use, thieving, property damage, physical assault) - Supplementary questions on e.g., impulse control and rebellious behavior - Short version of deviant/delinquent behavior measure 7. Demographics 7.1 Information on household - Household questionnaire (persons in the household, household grid, type of dwelling, income), information on assets 8. Environment 8.1 Activities with children - Occurrence and frequency of e.g., singing and making music together; story time; doing sports; cultural activities 8.2 Nursery - Detailed information on nursery and daycare institutions 8.3 Grand-parents - Relationship: contact frequency, quality of relationship 8.4 Parenting style - Monitoring, warmth, rules, negative communication, control (child and parent report on parental behavior) 8.5 Quality of home environment - Characteristics of a chaotic, disorganized, and hurried home - Interviewer ratings on the home environment (household) 8.6 Involvement - Autonomy, structure, control, emotional support 8.7 Sibling relationship - Warmth, conflict, rivalry of sibling relationship - Affection, hostility, rivalry of sibling relationship 8.8 Family stresses - Care burden on household level 8.9 Intentional level to achieve certain life events 8.10 Stays abroad 8.11 Information on twins´ children 9. Zygosity and twin specific items 9.1 Zygosity - Ratings of physical twin similarity in childhood (e.g., eye color, hair structure, time of getting first teeth) 9.2 Twin specific questions - E.g., same or different clothing, confusion of the twins, undertakings with twins 10. Covid-19 supplementary surveys 10.1 Health during the COVID-19 pandemic 10.2 socioeconomic changes 10.3 Covid-19-related behavior change 10.4 resilience, coping 10.5 perceived threat, stress and strain, psychological impairment 10.6 assessment of government restrictions. TwinLife ist eine auf zwölf Jahre angelegte repräsentative verhaltensgenetische Studie zur Entwicklung von sozialen Ungleichheiten. Für eine detaillierte Studien-Dokumention besuchen Sie bitte https://www.twin-life.de/documentation/ . Das Langfristvorhaben begann im Jahr 2014 und befragt in einem jährlichen Turnus über 4000 in Deutschland lebende Zwillingspaare und deren Familien zu unterschiedlichen Lebensbereichen. Durch den Vergleich von ein- und zweieiigen, gleichgeschlechtlichen Zwillingspaaren können neben sozialen Mechanismen auch genetische Differenzen zwischen Individuen, sowie die Kovariation und Interaktion sozialer und genetischer Einflussgrößen analysiert werden. Um die individuelle Entwicklung unterschiedlicher Einflussfaktoren zu dokumentieren werden die Familien über mehrere Jahre hinweg umfassend untersucht. Inhaltlich wird dabei auf sechs für soziale Ungleichheiten bedeutsame Lebensbereiche fokussiert: 1. Bildung und Kompetenzerwerb, 2. Karriere und Erfolg auf dem Arbeitsmarkt, 3. Integration und Teilhabe am sozialen, kulturellen und politischen Leben, 4. Lebensqualität und wahrgenommene Handlungsmöglichkeiten, 5. physische und psychologische Gesundheit sowie 6. Verhaltensprobleme und abweichendes Verhalten. In 2020 und 2021 fanden drei zusätzliche Befragungen zu den Einflüssen und Folgen der COVID-19-Pandemie statt. Die erste Zusatzerhebung hatte zum Ziel, retrospektiv das Verhalten, die Einstellungen, Belastungen, Gesundheit und sozioökonomische Veränderungen im Leben der Befragten während der ersten Welle der COVID-19-Pandemie von März 2020 bis hin zu den ersten Lockerungen der Lockdown-Maßnahmen zu erfassen. Die zweite Zusatzbefragung zielte darauf ab, aktuelle Verhaltensweisen, Einstellungen, Belastungen, gesundheitliche und sozioökonomische Veränderungen während der COVID-19-Pandemie zu erfassen. Die dritte ergänzende COVID-19-Umfrage befasste sich mit aktuellen Einstellungen, Belastungen, gesundheitlichen und sozioökonomischen Veränderungen aufgrund der COVID-19-Pandemie. Folgend werden die in den TwinLife-Daten erfassten Information aufgeteilt nach den skizzierten Lebensbereichen etwas genauer umschrieben: 1. Bildung und Kompetenzerwerb: Hier werden neben kognitiven Fähigkeiten, Persönlichkeitsmerkmalen und deren Entwicklung auch Informationen zu Zeugnisnoten, zur Bildungsmotivation und zum Bildungsniveau erhoben. Involvement Schule: Erwartungen der Eltern zu Lernanstrengung, Enttäuschung der Eltern bei schlechten Schulleistungen, emotionale Unterstützung der Eltern, Autonomie (z.B. Eltern ermutigen zu Nachfragen), Kontrolle (z.B. Eltern schimpfen bei schlechten Noten, drohen mit Strafen), Selbsteinschätzung der Fähigkeiten im Lesen, Kenntnis der Buchstaben im Alphabet, Wortschatz, Lesen der Uhr, Kenntnis verschiedener Formen, Zählen, Kenntnis vieler Zahlen; intrinsische Motivation Schule; Schulklima und Leistungsdruck; höchster Schulabschluss; Schulform der letzten Schule (Befragte ohne Abschluss); Jahr des Verlassens der allgemeinbildenden Schule (Abschlussjahr); Abschlussnote des höchsten Schulabschlusses; Ausbildungs- oder Studienabschluss; ISCED; Jahr des Ausbildungs- oder Studienabschlusses; Wiederholung einer Klassenstufe; wiederholte Klassen; Klasse übersprungen und Angabe der übersprungenen Klasse; Ausbildung bzw. Studium im Ausland; Bildungsempfehlung nach der Grundschule; Bildungsaspiration: gewünschter Schulabschluss; Wahrscheinlichkeit des gewünschten Schulabschlusses (100 %-Skala); angestrebter weiterer beruflicher Ausbildungs- oder Hochschulabschluss und Wahrscheinlichkeit des Erreichens (100 %-Skala). Aussagen über allgemeinbildende Schule: Akademisches Selbstkonzept: Selbsteinschätzung hinsichtlich der Begabung für die Schule allgemein, des Könnens und der Aufgabenbewältigung in der Schule allgemein, der Begabung für die Fächer Mathematik und Deutsch, des Könnens und der Aufgabenbewältigung in diesen Fächern; intrinsische Motivation (Freude am Lernstoff, Schule macht Spaß, Interesse am Lernstoff, Freude an Mathematik und Deutsch, Spaß an Mathematik und Deutsch, Interesse an Mathematik und Deutsch); Erwartungen an die Schule (Lernmotivation). Selbstregulierung: Selbstkontrolle; Gummibärchentest; Beständigkeit von Interessen. 2. Karriere und Erfolg auf dem Arbeitsmarkt: Dieser Bereich umfasst den aktuellen Beruf, die aktuelle berufliche Position sowie Informationen zum Einkommen (oder ggf. zum Bezug von Sozialleistungen). Zudem sind Informationen zur wahrgenommenen Arbeitsplatzsicherheit, zur Arbeitszufriedenheit und zum Arbeitsengagement enthalten. Berufliche Stellung und Charakteristika; Beschäftigungsdauer beim derzeitigen Arbeitgeber (Monat und Jahr); Öffentlichen Dienst; Zeitarbeit bzw. Leiharbeit; Art des Arbeitsvertrages; vereinbarte und tatsächliche Wochenarbeitszeit; Mini- bzw. Midi-Job; Arbeitslose wurden gefragt: Zeitpunkt der Beendigung der letzten Arbeitsstelle (Monat und Jahr), Beschäftigungsdauer beim letzten Arbeitgeber; Art der Beendigung des vorherigen Beschäftigungsverhältnisses; erforderliche Ausbildung für den Beruf; Arbeitsplatz am Wohnort; Häufigkeit Pendeln von der Hauptwohnung zum Arbeitsplatz; Entfernung des Arbeitsplatzes von der Hauptwohnung in Kilometern; Arbeitsplatzsicherheit; Wahrscheinlichkeit des Arbeitsplatzverlustes in den kommenden zwei Jahren; Jobzufriedenheit: Ausgeglichenheit zwischen eigener Leistung und Lohn am Arbeitsplatz; persönliches Bruttoeinkommen pro Monat bzw. pro Jahr (offen und kategorisiert); empfundene Einkommensgerechtigkeit in Bezug auf die eigene Tätigkeit; Einschätzung eines gerechten monatlichen Bruttoeinkommens; Autonomie bei Ausübung der Tätigkeit. Akademisches Selbstkonzept in Bezug auf den Beruf (gut im Beruf, gut im Job im Vergleich zu Kollegen, hohe Kompetenz im Job nach Einarbeitung, Zufriedenheit mit beruflicher Leistung, hohe Geschicklichkeit bei