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3,527 Research products, page 1 of 353

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
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  • English
  • COVID-19

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  • Embargo English
    Authors: 
    Meza Miranda, Eliana Romina; Parra Soto, Solange Liliana; Durán Agüero, Samuel; Gómez, Georgina; Carpio Arias, Valeria; Ríos Castillo, Israel; Murillo, Ana Gabriela; Araneda, Jacqueline; Morales, Gladys; Cavagnari, Brian M.; +6 more
    Country: Argentina

    Abstract: Introduction: Short sleep, physical inactivity, and being locked up are risk factors for weight gain. Objective: We evaluated weight gain according to sex, age, hours of sleep and physical activity in university students from 10 Latin American countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Cross-sectional and multicenter study (n = 4880). Results: The average age was 22.5 ± 4.4 years. 60.2% were currently locked up. 73.6% were women, 48.2% increased their body weight, 66% reported insufficient sleep hours, and 65.9% were inactive. Women gained more weight than men (73.2%) and younger students gained more weight (85.1%). Those who had insufficient sleep hours gained most weight (67.6%). Inactive participants gained most weight (74.7%). Students who have insufficient sleep are 21% more likely to have changes in body weight compared to students who have optimal sleep. Conclusion: The increase in body weight and its risk factors during confinement should be considered as emerging from public health.

  • Embargo English
    Authors: 
    Otero Losada, Matilde; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Alami, Abdallah; Crispo, James A.; Mattison, Donald; Capani, Francisco; Goetz, Christopher; Krewski, Daniel; Pérez Lloret, Santiago;
    Country: Argentina

    Abstract: Background: Information on neurological and psychiatric adverse events following immunization (AEFIs) with COVID-19 vaccines is limited. Research design & methods: We examined and compared neurological and psychiatric AEFIS reports related to BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) and ChAdOx1 (Oxford-AstraZeneca) COVID-19 vaccines and recorded in the United Kingdom Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency between 9 December 2020 and 30 June 2021. Results: As of 30 June 2021, 46.1 million doses of ChAdOx1 and 30.3 million doses of BNT162b2 had been administered. The most frequently reported AEFI was headache with 1,686 and 575 cases per million doses of ChAdOx1 and BNT162b2, respectively. AEFIs more frequently reported after CHAdOx1 compared with BNT162b2 vaccination were Guillain-Barré syndrome (OR, 95% CI = 2.53, 1.82–3.51), freezing (6.66, 3.12–14.22), cluster headache (1.53, 1.28–1.84), migraine (1.23,1.17–1.30), postural dizziness (1.24,1.13–1.37), tremor (2.86, 2.68–3.05), headache (1.40, 1.38–1.43), paresthesia (1.11, 1.06–1.16), delirium (1.85, 1.45–2.36), hallucination (2.20, 1.82–2.66), poor quality sleep (1.53, 1.26–1.85), and nervousness (1.54, 1.26–1.89) Reactions less frequently reported with ChAdOx1 than with BNT162b2 were Bell’s palsy (0.47, 0.41–0.55), anosmia (0.58, 0.47–0.71), facial paralysis (0.35, 0.29– 0.41), dysgeusia (0.68, 0.62–0.73), presyncope (0.48, 0.42–0.55), syncope (0.63, 0.58–0.67), and anxiety (0.75 (0.67–0.85). Conclusion: Neurological and psychiatric AEFIs were relatively infrequent, but each vaccine was associated with a distinctive toxic profile. Plain Language Summary We examined reports on adverse neurological and psychiatric effects following immunization with BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) and ChAdOx1 (Oxford-AstraZeneca) for COVID-19 to the United Kingdom Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency between 9 December 2020 and 30 June 2021. Adverse effects following immunization (AEFIs) were relatively infrequent. Compared to BNT162b2, Guillain-Barré syndrome, freezing phenomenon, cluster headache, migraine, postural dizziness, tremor, headache, paresthesia, delirium, hallucination, poor quality sleep, and nervousness were more frequently reported for ChAdOx1. Reactions less frequently reported for ChAdOx1 than for BNT162b2 were Bell’s palsy, anosmia, facial paralysis, dysgeusia, presyncope, syncope, and anxiety.

  • Embargo English
    Authors: 
    Barrantes, Francisco José;
    Country: Argentina

    Abstract: Critical to viral infection are the multiple interactions between viral proteins and host-cell counterparts. The first such interaction is the recognition of viral envelope proteins by surface receptors that normally fulfil other physiological roles, a hijacking mechanism perfected over the course of evolution. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has successfully adopted this strategy using its spike glycoprotein to dock on the membraneboundmetalloprotease angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The crystal structures of several SARS-CoV-2 proteins alone or in complex with their receptors or other ligands were recently solved at an unprecedented pace. This accomplishment is partly due to the increasing availability of data on other coronaviruses and ACE2 over the past 18 years. Likewise, other key intervening actors and mechanisms of viral infection were elucidated with the aid of biophysical approaches. An understanding of the various structurally important motifs of the interacting partners provides key mechanistic information for the development of structure-based designer drugs able to inhibit various steps of the infective cycle, including neutralizing antibodies, small organic drugs, and vaccines. This review analyzes current progress and the outlook for future structural studies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scherer, Ronny; Siddiq, Fazilat; Howard, Sarah K.; Tondeur, Jo;

    In the present study, we tested the common assumption that teachers with more experience consider themselves better prepared for online teaching and learning (OTL). Utilizing the data from a survey of 366 higher-education teachers from Portugal at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, we performed structural equation modeling to quantify the experience-readiness relationship. The survey contained an assessment of teachers' OTL readiness which was measured by their perceptions of the institutional support, online teaching presence, and TPACK self-efficacy. In contrast to the linearity assumption “the more experienced, the better prepared”, we found robust evidence for a curvilinear relationship. Teachers’ readiness for OTL increased first and then decreased with more experience—this applied especially to the self-efficacy dimension of readiness. Further analyses suggested that the experience-readiness relationship does not only exist at the level of aggregated constructs but also at the level of indicators, that is, specific areas of knowledge, teaching, and support. We argue that both novice and experienced teachers in higher education could benefit from experience-appropriate, pedagogical, and content-related support programs for OTL.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cilloni, Lucia; Kendall, Emily; Dowdy, David; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Supporting information for "Adaptive strategies for the deployment of rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19: a modelling study"

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Nardelli, P.; Scandroglio, A.M.; De Piero, M.E.; Mariani, S.; Lorusso, R.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Purpose of reviewCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we had to approach hospital- and intensive care unit (ICU)-related resource management, especially for demanding techniques required for advanced support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).Recent findingsAvailability of ICU beds and ECMO machines widely varies around the world. In critical conditions, such a global pandemic, the establishment of contingency capacity tiers might help in defining to which conditions and subjects ECMO can be offered. A frequent reassessment of the resource saturation, possibly integrated within a regional healthcare coordination system, may be of help to triage the patients who most likely will benefit from advanced techniques, especially when capacities are limited.SummaryIndications to ECMO during the pandemic should be fluid and may be adjusted over time. Candidacy of patients should follow the same prepandemic rules, taking into account the acute disease, the burden of any eventual comorbidity and the chances of a good quality of life after recovery; but the current capacity of healthcare system should also be considered, and frequently reassessed, possibly within a wide hub-and-spoke healthcare system.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Bock, Ellen; Herman, Eline S.; Bastian, Okan W.; Filipe, Mando D.; Vriens, Menno R.; Richir, Milan C.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: To provide for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) healthcare capacity, (surgical oncology) guidelines were established, forcing to alter the timing of performing surgical procedures. It is essential to determine whether these guidelines have led to disease progression. This study aims to give an insight into the number of surgical oncology procedures performed during the pandemic and provide information on short-term clinical outcomes. Materials and methods: A systematic literature search was performed on all COVID-19 articles including operated patients, published before March 21, 2022. Meta-analysis was performed to visualize the number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period. Random effects models were used for evaluating short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-four studies containing 6762 patients who underwent a surgical oncology procedure during the pandemic were included. The number of performed surgical procedures for an oncological pathology decreased (−26.4%) during the pandemic. The number of performed surgical procedures for breast cancer remained stable (+0.3%). Moreover, no difference was identified in the number of ≥T2 (OR 1.00, P = 0.989), ≥T3 (OR 0.95, P = 0.778), ≥N1 (OR 1.01, P = 0.964) and major postoperative complications (OR 1.55, P = 0.134) during the pandemic. Conclusion: The number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic decreased. In addition, the number of performed surgical breast cancer procedures remained stable. Oncological staging and major postoperative complications showed no significant difference compared to pre-pandemic practice. During future pandemics, the performed surgical oncology practice during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic seems appropriate for short-term results.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johansson, Veronica; Wänström, Linda; Ramme, Kim; Nilsdotter Swartswe, Johanna; Kallio, Sakari;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Template for the Swedish national survey questionnaire directed to long-COVID / post-COVID sufferers in Swedish Facebook groups. The survey comprises questions on demographics, background factors, symptoms and changes over time, health impacts, information needs and practices, and validated scales for rating certain symptoms. The survey was produced for the research project CiLC-S - Crowdsourcing Long-COVID Sweden, and conducted in 2021. The survey is designed for anonymous participation and open digital methods distribution through social media and web channels.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Manz, Xue D.; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Aman, Jurjan;
    Country: Netherlands

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation promotes thrombosis via a VWF (von Willebrand factor)-mediated mechanism. VWF plays an essential role in maintaining the balance between blood coagulation and bleeding, and inflammation can lead to aberrant regulation. VWF is regulated on a transcriptional and (post-)translational level, and its secretion into the circulation captures platelets upon endothelial activation. The significant progress that has been made in understanding transcriptional and translational regulation of VWF is described in this review. First, we describe how VWF is regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level with a specific focus on the influence of inflammatory and immune responses. Next, we describe how changes in regulation are linked with various cardiovascular diseases. Recent insights from clinical diseases provide evidence for direct molecular links between inflammation and thrombosis, including atherosclerosis, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and COVID-19. Finally, we will briefly describe clinical implications for antithrombotic treatment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Singh, Kavita; Kondal, Dimple; Raspail, Lana; Mohan, Bishav; Kato, Toru; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Talukder, Shamim Hayder; Akter, Shahin; Amin, Mohammad Robed; +26 more
    Country: Netherlands

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.5334/gh.1128.].

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
3,527 Research products, page 1 of 353
  • Embargo English
    Authors: 
    Meza Miranda, Eliana Romina; Parra Soto, Solange Liliana; Durán Agüero, Samuel; Gómez, Georgina; Carpio Arias, Valeria; Ríos Castillo, Israel; Murillo, Ana Gabriela; Araneda, Jacqueline; Morales, Gladys; Cavagnari, Brian M.; +6 more
    Country: Argentina

    Abstract: Introduction: Short sleep, physical inactivity, and being locked up are risk factors for weight gain. Objective: We evaluated weight gain according to sex, age, hours of sleep and physical activity in university students from 10 Latin American countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Cross-sectional and multicenter study (n = 4880). Results: The average age was 22.5 ± 4.4 years. 60.2% were currently locked up. 73.6% were women, 48.2% increased their body weight, 66% reported insufficient sleep hours, and 65.9% were inactive. Women gained more weight than men (73.2%) and younger students gained more weight (85.1%). Those who had insufficient sleep hours gained most weight (67.6%). Inactive participants gained most weight (74.7%). Students who have insufficient sleep are 21% more likely to have changes in body weight compared to students who have optimal sleep. Conclusion: The increase in body weight and its risk factors during confinement should be considered as emerging from public health.

  • Embargo English
    Authors: 
    Otero Losada, Matilde; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Alami, Abdallah; Crispo, James A.; Mattison, Donald; Capani, Francisco; Goetz, Christopher; Krewski, Daniel; Pérez Lloret, Santiago;
    Country: Argentina

    Abstract: Background: Information on neurological and psychiatric adverse events following immunization (AEFIs) with COVID-19 vaccines is limited. Research design & methods: We examined and compared neurological and psychiatric AEFIS reports related to BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) and ChAdOx1 (Oxford-AstraZeneca) COVID-19 vaccines and recorded in the United Kingdom Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency between 9 December 2020 and 30 June 2021. Results: As of 30 June 2021, 46.1 million doses of ChAdOx1 and 30.3 million doses of BNT162b2 had been administered. The most frequently reported AEFI was headache with 1,686 and 575 cases per million doses of ChAdOx1 and BNT162b2, respectively. AEFIs more frequently reported after CHAdOx1 compared with BNT162b2 vaccination were Guillain-Barré syndrome (OR, 95% CI = 2.53, 1.82–3.51), freezing (6.66, 3.12–14.22), cluster headache (1.53, 1.28–1.84), migraine (1.23,1.17–1.30), postural dizziness (1.24,1.13–1.37), tremor (2.86, 2.68–3.05), headache (1.40, 1.38–1.43), paresthesia (1.11, 1.06–1.16), delirium (1.85, 1.45–2.36), hallucination (2.20, 1.82–2.66), poor quality sleep (1.53, 1.26–1.85), and nervousness (1.54, 1.26–1.89) Reactions less frequently reported with ChAdOx1 than with BNT162b2 were Bell’s palsy (0.47, 0.41–0.55), anosmia (0.58, 0.47–0.71), facial paralysis (0.35, 0.29– 0.41), dysgeusia (0.68, 0.62–0.73), presyncope (0.48, 0.42–0.55), syncope (0.63, 0.58–0.67), and anxiety (0.75 (0.67–0.85). Conclusion: Neurological and psychiatric AEFIs were relatively infrequent, but each vaccine was associated with a distinctive toxic profile. Plain Language Summary We examined reports on adverse neurological and psychiatric effects following immunization with BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) and ChAdOx1 (Oxford-AstraZeneca) for COVID-19 to the United Kingdom Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency between 9 December 2020 and 30 June 2021. Adverse effects following immunization (AEFIs) were relatively infrequent. Compared to BNT162b2, Guillain-Barré syndrome, freezing phenomenon, cluster headache, migraine, postural dizziness, tremor, headache, paresthesia, delirium, hallucination, poor quality sleep, and nervousness were more frequently reported for ChAdOx1. Reactions less frequently reported for ChAdOx1 than for BNT162b2 were Bell’s palsy, anosmia, facial paralysis, dysgeusia, presyncope, syncope, and anxiety.

  • Embargo English
    Authors: 
    Barrantes, Francisco José;
    Country: Argentina

    Abstract: Critical to viral infection are the multiple interactions between viral proteins and host-cell counterparts. The first such interaction is the recognition of viral envelope proteins by surface receptors that normally fulfil other physiological roles, a hijacking mechanism perfected over the course of evolution. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has successfully adopted this strategy using its spike glycoprotein to dock on the membraneboundmetalloprotease angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The crystal structures of several SARS-CoV-2 proteins alone or in complex with their receptors or other ligands were recently solved at an unprecedented pace. This accomplishment is partly due to the increasing availability of data on other coronaviruses and ACE2 over the past 18 years. Likewise, other key intervening actors and mechanisms of viral infection were elucidated with the aid of biophysical approaches. An understanding of the various structurally important motifs of the interacting partners provides key mechanistic information for the development of structure-based designer drugs able to inhibit various steps of the infective cycle, including neutralizing antibodies, small organic drugs, and vaccines. This review analyzes current progress and the outlook for future structural studies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scherer, Ronny; Siddiq, Fazilat; Howard, Sarah K.; Tondeur, Jo;

    In the present study, we tested the common assumption that teachers with more experience consider themselves better prepared for online teaching and learning (OTL). Utilizing the data from a survey of 366 higher-education teachers from Portugal at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, we performed structural equation modeling to quantify the experience-readiness relationship. The survey contained an assessment of teachers' OTL readiness which was measured by their perceptions of the institutional support, online teaching presence, and TPACK self-efficacy. In contrast to the linearity assumption “the more experienced, the better prepared”, we found robust evidence for a curvilinear relationship. Teachers’ readiness for OTL increased first and then decreased with more experience—this applied especially to the self-efficacy dimension of readiness. Further analyses suggested that the experience-readiness relationship does not only exist at the level of aggregated constructs but also at the level of indicators, that is, specific areas of knowledge, teaching, and support. We argue that both novice and experienced teachers in higher education could benefit from experience-appropriate, pedagogical, and content-related support programs for OTL.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cilloni, Lucia; Kendall, Emily; Dowdy, David; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Supporting information for "Adaptive strategies for the deployment of rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19: a modelling study"

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Nardelli, P.; Scandroglio, A.M.; De Piero, M.E.; Mariani, S.; Lorusso, R.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Purpose of reviewCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we had to approach hospital- and intensive care unit (ICU)-related resource management, especially for demanding techniques required for advanced support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).Recent findingsAvailability of ICU beds and ECMO machines widely varies around the world. In critical conditions, such a global pandemic, the establishment of contingency capacity tiers might help in defining to which conditions and subjects ECMO can be offered. A frequent reassessment of the resource saturation, possibly integrated within a regional healthcare coordination system, may be of help to triage the patients who most likely will benefit from advanced techniques, especially when capacities are limited.SummaryIndications to ECMO during the pandemic should be fluid and may be adjusted over time. Candidacy of patients should follow the same prepandemic rules, taking into account the acute disease, the burden of any eventual comorbidity and the chances of a good quality of life after recovery; but the current capacity of healthcare system should also be considered, and frequently reassessed, possibly within a wide hub-and-spoke healthcare system.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Bock, Ellen; Herman, Eline S.; Bastian, Okan W.; Filipe, Mando D.; Vriens, Menno R.; Richir, Milan C.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: To provide for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) healthcare capacity, (surgical oncology) guidelines were established, forcing to alter the timing of performing surgical procedures. It is essential to determine whether these guidelines have led to disease progression. This study aims to give an insight into the number of surgical oncology procedures performed during the pandemic and provide information on short-term clinical outcomes. Materials and methods: A systematic literature search was performed on all COVID-19 articles including operated patients, published before March 21, 2022. Meta-analysis was performed to visualize the number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period. Random effects models were used for evaluating short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-four studies containing 6762 patients who underwent a surgical oncology procedure during the pandemic were included. The number of performed surgical procedures for an oncological pathology decreased (−26.4%) during the pandemic. The number of performed surgical procedures for breast cancer remained stable (+0.3%). Moreover, no difference was identified in the number of ≥T2 (OR 1.00, P = 0.989), ≥T3 (OR 0.95, P = 0.778), ≥N1 (OR 1.01, P = 0.964) and major postoperative complications (OR 1.55, P = 0.134) during the pandemic. Conclusion: The number of performed surgical oncology procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic decreased. In addition, the number of performed surgical breast cancer procedures remained stable. Oncological staging and major postoperative complications showed no significant difference compared to pre-pandemic practice. During future pandemics, the performed surgical oncology practice during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic seems appropriate for short-term results.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johansson, Veronica; Wänström, Linda; Ramme, Kim; Nilsdotter Swartswe, Johanna; Kallio, Sakari;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Template for the Swedish national survey questionnaire directed to long-COVID / post-COVID sufferers in Swedish Facebook groups. The survey comprises questions on demographics, background factors, symptoms and changes over time, health impacts, information needs and practices, and validated scales for rating certain symptoms. The survey was produced for the research project CiLC-S - Crowdsourcing Long-COVID Sweden, and conducted in 2021. The survey is designed for anonymous participation and open digital methods distribution through social media and web channels.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Manz, Xue D.; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Aman, Jurjan;
    Country: Netherlands

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation promotes thrombosis via a VWF (von Willebrand factor)-mediated mechanism. VWF plays an essential role in maintaining the balance between blood coagulation and bleeding, and inflammation can lead to aberrant regulation. VWF is regulated on a transcriptional and (post-)translational level, and its secretion into the circulation captures platelets upon endothelial activation. The significant progress that has been made in understanding transcriptional and translational regulation of VWF is described in this review. First, we describe how VWF is regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level with a specific focus on the influence of inflammatory and immune responses. Next, we describe how changes in regulation are linked with various cardiovascular diseases. Recent insights from clinical diseases provide evidence for direct molecular links between inflammation and thrombosis, including atherosclerosis, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and COVID-19. Finally, we will briefly describe clinical implications for antithrombotic treatment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Singh, Kavita; Kondal, Dimple; Raspail, Lana; Mohan, Bishav; Kato, Toru; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Talukder, Shamim Hayder; Akter, Shahin; Amin, Mohammad Robed; +26 more
    Country: Netherlands

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.5334/gh.1128.].