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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
606 Research products, page 1 of 61

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
  • 2019-2023
  • English
  • LSE Research Online
  • Alexandria Research Platform
  • COVID-19

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  • English
    Authors: 
    White, Jonathan;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    What is the future of technocracy, after COVID-19, asks Jonathan White (LSE)? Current crisis management only blurs ever more the boundary between politics and technical expertise, he argues.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Bhalotia, Shania; Dhingra, Swati; Kondirolli, Fjola;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has decimated livelihoods in urban India and created a new underclass of workers who are being pushed into poverty. Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli (LSE) say a national work guarantee is needed to prevent mass long-term unemployment and poverty.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad Ali;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Problems of this severity and scope can only be solved through global cooperation, write Muhammad Shahbaz and Muhammad Ali Nasir

  • English
    Authors: 
    Ahmed, Maliha;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    California’s ‘superstar’ cities and regions – which together make up nearly 90 percent of the state’s GDP – have experienced the highest number of COVID-19 cases. Maliha Ahmed writes that despite being hard hit, these superstar areas have a combination of industries which have been less affected by the pandemic compared to those in poorer areas. With both superstar and non-superstar areas experiencing nearly equal increases in unemployment since February, she argues that policymakers will need to target assistance to poorer areas to prevent rising inequality.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Henwood, Melanie;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Despite the overall drop in COVID-19 deaths, the latest data reveal continuing increases occurring in care homes and the community. Melanie Henwood explains why there is a need for more scrutiny around what is happening in care homes and across the social care system.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Monnery, Neil;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Adjusting for population size and agreeing on the definition of a 'Covid death' can have important policy implications, writes Neil Monnery

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Pun, Min;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has transformed academic publishing, for books and journals. In this post Min Pun, shares his experiences as editor of two journals in Nepal. He outlines some of the opportunities posed by COVID-19, including the increased demand for research. However, there are also multiple barriers to the production and dissemination of knowledge in Nepal, including lack of funding for open access publishing and an increasing reliance on secondary evidence.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Wenham, Clare;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Every Thursday the UK is encouraged to ‘clap for carers’ – who are far more likely to be women. Yet the government has not considered how measures such as furlough and school closures affect women disproportionately, and there is an absence of female representation at the top of government and in the COVID-19 working group. Clare Wenham (LSE) says that this needs to change as it develops an exit strategy.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Moss, Gemma;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Gemma Moss considers whether COVID-19 can act as a catalyst for change in education, leading to different policy choices and a more stable education system, better able to address the dilemmas that prolonged disruption in education and which current policy does so little to address.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Connolly, John;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    John Connolly draws on new survey data to argue that the UK public have a strong sense of individual responsibility when it comes to containing the spread of the virus and resolving the crisis. He also finds that the decisions of governmental actors at multiple levels are generally perceived as positive, but warns that clear communication from government is crucial in maintaining this support as the UK prepares to exit the lockdown.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
606 Research products, page 1 of 61
  • English
    Authors: 
    White, Jonathan;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    What is the future of technocracy, after COVID-19, asks Jonathan White (LSE)? Current crisis management only blurs ever more the boundary between politics and technical expertise, he argues.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Bhalotia, Shania; Dhingra, Swati; Kondirolli, Fjola;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has decimated livelihoods in urban India and created a new underclass of workers who are being pushed into poverty. Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli (LSE) say a national work guarantee is needed to prevent mass long-term unemployment and poverty.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad Ali;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Problems of this severity and scope can only be solved through global cooperation, write Muhammad Shahbaz and Muhammad Ali Nasir

  • English
    Authors: 
    Ahmed, Maliha;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    California’s ‘superstar’ cities and regions – which together make up nearly 90 percent of the state’s GDP – have experienced the highest number of COVID-19 cases. Maliha Ahmed writes that despite being hard hit, these superstar areas have a combination of industries which have been less affected by the pandemic compared to those in poorer areas. With both superstar and non-superstar areas experiencing nearly equal increases in unemployment since February, she argues that policymakers will need to target assistance to poorer areas to prevent rising inequality.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Henwood, Melanie;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Despite the overall drop in COVID-19 deaths, the latest data reveal continuing increases occurring in care homes and the community. Melanie Henwood explains why there is a need for more scrutiny around what is happening in care homes and across the social care system.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Monnery, Neil;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Adjusting for population size and agreeing on the definition of a 'Covid death' can have important policy implications, writes Neil Monnery

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Pun, Min;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    COVID-19 has transformed academic publishing, for books and journals. In this post Min Pun, shares his experiences as editor of two journals in Nepal. He outlines some of the opportunities posed by COVID-19, including the increased demand for research. However, there are also multiple barriers to the production and dissemination of knowledge in Nepal, including lack of funding for open access publishing and an increasing reliance on secondary evidence.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Wenham, Clare;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Every Thursday the UK is encouraged to ‘clap for carers’ – who are far more likely to be women. Yet the government has not considered how measures such as furlough and school closures affect women disproportionately, and there is an absence of female representation at the top of government and in the COVID-19 working group. Clare Wenham (LSE) says that this needs to change as it develops an exit strategy.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Moss, Gemma;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    Gemma Moss considers whether COVID-19 can act as a catalyst for change in education, leading to different policy choices and a more stable education system, better able to address the dilemmas that prolonged disruption in education and which current policy does so little to address.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Connolly, John;
    Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom

    John Connolly draws on new survey data to argue that the UK public have a strong sense of individual responsibility when it comes to containing the spread of the virus and resolving the crisis. He also finds that the decisions of governmental actors at multiple levels are generally perceived as positive, but warns that clear communication from government is crucial in maintaining this support as the UK prepares to exit the lockdown.