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507 Research products, page 1 of 51

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dinar Duarte Vasconcelos;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Atividade interativa sobre Saúde Planetária e Covid-19, desenvolvida com fins didáticos pedagógicos para adolescentes de escola pública. A educação é uma aliada no combate a pandemia da Covid-19. Espaços formais como as escolas deveriam ser utilizadas com o objetivo de combater fake news, proporcionar conhecimento acadêmico sobre doenças infecciosas entres adolescentes. A aprendizagem precisa ser significativa e contextualizada, estimular os jovens a assumirem papel de protagonismo juvenil. Para isso, utilizar tecnologias visando a construção de espaços para abordar temas complexos e necessários.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    J. E. Pekar; J. O. Wertheim;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data 5 for the manuscript. Refer to Data 1 for the full description and links to the remaining datasets: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6887186

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Saurin, T.A.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This viewpoint note discusses the covid-19 pandemic from the lens of complexity thinking and resilience engineering (RE). It intends to raise questions and encourage critical thinking on the underlying theoretical foundations of the responses adopted so far to cope with the pandemic. Insights arising from this analysis can be useful for the refinement of complexity and RE theory and practice, as well as for the further development of non-medical practices to address the pandemic and its effects.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jolijn Van Leeuwen1;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Background/ Objectives: Avacopan is a new, promising treatment for ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and can potentially replace steroids. Compared to steroid tapering, avacopan has demonstrated non-inferiority for treatment response at 26 weeks, superiority for sustaining remission at 52 weeks and a reduction of relapses.1 Most recently avacopan was approved for the treatment of AAV by the U.S. Food and ug Administration and approval is pending at the European Medicines Agency (EMA).2 We now report the first clinical experience with avacopan in difficult-to-treat AAV patients in the setting of a compassionate use program. Methods: We collected disease relevant characteristics for the adult AAV patients who were treated with avacopan in the setting of the compassionate use program at the department of Nephrology of the Leiden University Medical Center. Patients were classified by their reason to start avacopan and clinical remission was based on physician’s clinical assessments as reported in the electronic health records. We collected relevant data to assess steroid-related toxicity effects in line with the Glucocorticoid Toxicity Index (GTI) (v2017).3 Results: Eight adult AAV patients were treated within the avacopan compassionate use program at our institute. Indications for avacopan were steroid resistance (n=4), steroid dependence (n=2) and high risk of steroid toxicity (n=2). Most patients had relapsing disease (numbers of flares ranging from 0-3) and received multiple previous remission induction therapies (median 2, range 1-6). All patients achieved clinical remission within six months after avacopan was started. Only one patient experienced a major flare, which coincided with a reduction of avacopan dosing to 20mg bd due to delayed supply during the COVID-19 pandemic. Steroid tapering was successful in all patients, with five patients discontinuing prednisone and three patients continuing low doses of prednisolone (2.5-7.5mg/day). After one year of avacopan use, the GTI improved in four patients. In one patient the GTI worsened due to weight gain. Six patients satisfactorily continue avacopan and are persistently in clinical remission. One patient stopped because of a pregnancy wish. Conclusions: We here provide the first real-life practice observations on the compassionate use of avacopan in difficult-to-treat AAV patients. Avacopan demonstrated added-value in the treatment of our difficult-to-treat AAV cases with respect to improved disease control, reduced steroid dependence and reduced steroid-related toxicity. Disclosures: The work of YKOT was supported by the Dutch Kidney Foundation (17OKG04) and by the Arthritis Research and Collaboration Hub (ARCH) foundation. ARCH is funded by Dutch Arthritis Foundation (ReumaNederland). YKOT received an unrestricted research grant and consultancy fees from Vifor Pharma. References 1. Jayne, D.R.W., et al., Avacopan for the Treatment of ANCA-Associated Vasculitis. N Engl J Med, 2021. 384(7): p. 599-609. 2. ANCA vasculitis News. FDA Approves Tavneos as Add-on Therapy for Severe MPA, GPA. Published October 11, 2021. Accessed October 29, 2021. https://ancavasculitisnews.com/2021/10/11/fda-approves-tavneos-avacopan-add-on-mpa-gpa-therapy/ 3. Miloslavsky, E.M., et al., Development of a Glucocorticoid Toxicity Index (GTI) using multicriteria decision analysis. Ann Rheum Dis, 2017. 76(3): p. 543-546.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Matthew Koster1;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Background: Pre-clinical giant cell arteritis (GCA) mouse models have demonstrated effective suppression of arterial wall lesional T-cells through inhibition of Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) and JAK1. However, JAK inhibition in patients with GCA has not been formerly investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective, open-label, pilot study of baricitinib (4mg/day) in patients with relapsing GCA. The primary outcome was the frequency of adverse events and serious adverse events at week 52. Secondary outcomes included relapse at week 24 and week 52, change in pre-enrollment erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) to week 24 and week 52, and comparison of glucocorticoid dose at enrollment to week 24 and week 52. The study schema is outlined in Figure 1. Results: 15 patients were enrolled in the study (11, 73% female) with a mean(SD) age at entry 72.4(7.2) years, median(IQR) duration of GCA of 9 (7, 21) months, and median of 1 (1, 2) prior relapse. Treatments prior to study entry included: glucocorticoids (15, 100%); methotrexate (2, 13%); cyclophosphamide (1, 7%); sirukumab (1, 7%). Characteristics at GCA diagnosis and at relapse prior to study entry are listed in Table 1. Four (27%) patients entered the study on prednisone 30mg/day, 6 (40%) at 20 mg/day, and 5 (33%) at 10mg/day. One patient with baseline chronic kidney disease had a decline in renal function below study threshold for continuation and was withdrawn at week 8. The remaining 14 patients completed 52 weeks of baricitinib. At week 52, 14/15 (93%) patients had at least one adverse event recorded with the most frequent events including: infection not requiring antibiotics (n=8), infection requiring antibiotics (n=5), nausea (n=6), leg swelling (n=2), fatigue (n=2), diarrhea (n=1), abdominal pain (n=1). Two patients contracted COVID-19 during the study, both with mild symptoms, neither hospitalized. One patient had a serious adverse event during the study (transient thrombocytopenia attributed to concomitant use of antimicrobial therapy). Study outcomes are listed in Table 2. ESR and CRP were significantly lower at week 24 and week 52 compared to pre-enrollment values. Patient global assessment at week 0 was also significantly improved at both week 24 and week 52. Only 1 of 14 (7%) patients relapsed during the study (same patient at week 24 and week 52). The remaining 13 patients achieved steroid discontinuation and remained in disease remission during the duration of the 52-week study. Among patients completing the study, 4/14 (29%) flared during the 12-week follow up period after baricitinib discontinuation. Conclusion: In this proof of concept study, baricitinib at a dose of 4mg/day appeared both safe and effective in the management of patients with relapsing GCA. Larger randomized clinical trials are needed to determine the utility of JAK inhibition in GCA. Disclosures: KW received funds from Eli Lilly and Company to assist in the completion of the clinical trial. MK, CS, RG, JJ, EM, AD-G, CW report no financial disclosures of interest related to this study.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Setayesh Yazdani; Nicola De Maio; Matthieu Schapira;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This document is about the druggability and genetic variability of the ADP-bound pocket of SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NiRAN domain across coronaviruses and SARS-CoV-2 samples. This report also accompanies this post on https://openlabnotebooks.org/.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hayder Fawzi; Haydar Al-Tukmagi;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    examination of pharmacy students

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Duilio F Manara; Giulia Villa; Lisa Korelic; Cristina Arrigoni; Federica Dellafiore; Valentina Milani; Greta Ghizzardi; Arianna Magon; Noemi Giannetta; Rosario Caruso;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Interviews from Manara DF, Villa G, Korelic L, Arrigoni C, Dellafiore F, Milani V, Ghizzardi G, Magon A, Giannetta N, Caruso R. One-week longitudinal daily description of moral distress, coping, and general health in healthcare workers during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy: A quantitative diary study. Acta Biomed. 2021 Oct 5;92(S6):e2021461. doi: 10.23750/abm.v92iS6.12313. PMID: 34739455. Abstract Background and aim of the work .The fluctuation from day to day within a working week of moral distress, coping, and general health of frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) in facing the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic has been poorly studied. This study described the weekly fluctuation from day to day of moral distress, coping, and general health in frontline HCWs who worked during the first epidemic wave (May-June 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. Methods: This study has an intensive longitudinal design, and a convenience sampling procedure was employed to enroll physicians, nurses, allied health professions, and healthcare assistants. Data collection was performed using diary encompassed four sections: a socio-demographic form (required only at the baseline data collection) and three scales to assess moral distress, coping, and general health. Results: Results confirmed poor perceived health and mild moral distress in frontline HCWs, especially in HCWs with offspring, during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and the stability of their daily perception over a working week regarding moral distress, general health, and avoidant coping strategy, while approach coping strategy reported a slight fluctuation over time. Conclusions: Accordingly, on the one hand, these results confirm that outcomes regarding mental health and moral distress are pretty stable and provide insights, on the other hand, regarding the possible organizational interventions to support approach coping strategy as it seems more susceptible to variation over time.

  • Open Access French
    Authors: 
    GEBEIL Sophie; FELIX Christine; FILIPPI Pierre-Alain; MARTIN Perrine;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Le questionnaire a été diffusé en ligne du 9 avril 2020 au 7 juin 2020 sur http://sphinx2.espe.univ-amu.fr/v4/s/9ab5go Il a recueilli 4071 réponses.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Serkan Sayıner; Ahmet Özer Şehirli;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Although the types of coronaviruses seen in animals differ, recent studies have also shown that they are affected by COVID-19, known as SARS-CoV-2. The impact of COVID-19 on animals is a factor that should be followed carefully, especially since different variants appear in humans every day and this disease is transmitted from human to animal. Thanks to vaccination, animals are less affected by different types of coronaviruses. Cats and ferrets are especially affected much more in COVID-19, causing damage to the lungs and other organs. Recently, it has been shown that the use of monoclonal antibodies, especially in the early stages of COVID-19, by people with chronic diseases, positively affects the course of the disease, reduces the frequency of hospitalization and the possibility of falling into intensive care. Sotrovimab is a pan-sarbecovirus monoclonal antibody, and 12-13 studies to date have shown that individuals with chronic disease are less affected when given in the early stages of the disease when the symptoms are mild. We also think that if especially old cats and ferrets are treated with Sotrovimab in the early stages of the disease when they contract COVID-19, it will positively affect the prognosis of the disease.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
507 Research products, page 1 of 51
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dinar Duarte Vasconcelos;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Atividade interativa sobre Saúde Planetária e Covid-19, desenvolvida com fins didáticos pedagógicos para adolescentes de escola pública. A educação é uma aliada no combate a pandemia da Covid-19. Espaços formais como as escolas deveriam ser utilizadas com o objetivo de combater fake news, proporcionar conhecimento acadêmico sobre doenças infecciosas entres adolescentes. A aprendizagem precisa ser significativa e contextualizada, estimular os jovens a assumirem papel de protagonismo juvenil. Para isso, utilizar tecnologias visando a construção de espaços para abordar temas complexos e necessários.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    J. E. Pekar; J. O. Wertheim;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data 5 for the manuscript. Refer to Data 1 for the full description and links to the remaining datasets: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6887186

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Saurin, T.A.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This viewpoint note discusses the covid-19 pandemic from the lens of complexity thinking and resilience engineering (RE). It intends to raise questions and encourage critical thinking on the underlying theoretical foundations of the responses adopted so far to cope with the pandemic. Insights arising from this analysis can be useful for the refinement of complexity and RE theory and practice, as well as for the further development of non-medical practices to address the pandemic and its effects.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jolijn Van Leeuwen1;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Background/ Objectives: Avacopan is a new, promising treatment for ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and can potentially replace steroids. Compared to steroid tapering, avacopan has demonstrated non-inferiority for treatment response at 26 weeks, superiority for sustaining remission at 52 weeks and a reduction of relapses.1 Most recently avacopan was approved for the treatment of AAV by the U.S. Food and ug Administration and approval is pending at the European Medicines Agency (EMA).2 We now report the first clinical experience with avacopan in difficult-to-treat AAV patients in the setting of a compassionate use program. Methods: We collected disease relevant characteristics for the adult AAV patients who were treated with avacopan in the setting of the compassionate use program at the department of Nephrology of the Leiden University Medical Center. Patients were classified by their reason to start avacopan and clinical remission was based on physician’s clinical assessments as reported in the electronic health records. We collected relevant data to assess steroid-related toxicity effects in line with the Glucocorticoid Toxicity Index (GTI) (v2017).3 Results: Eight adult AAV patients were treated within the avacopan compassionate use program at our institute. Indications for avacopan were steroid resistance (n=4), steroid dependence (n=2) and high risk of steroid toxicity (n=2). Most patients had relapsing disease (numbers of flares ranging from 0-3) and received multiple previous remission induction therapies (median 2, range 1-6). All patients achieved clinical remission within six months after avacopan was started. Only one patient experienced a major flare, which coincided with a reduction of avacopan dosing to 20mg bd due to delayed supply during the COVID-19 pandemic. Steroid tapering was successful in all patients, with five patients discontinuing prednisone and three patients continuing low doses of prednisolone (2.5-7.5mg/day). After one year of avacopan use, the GTI improved in four patients. In one patient the GTI worsened due to weight gain. Six patients satisfactorily continue avacopan and are persistently in clinical remission. One patient stopped because of a pregnancy wish. Conclusions: We here provide the first real-life practice observations on the compassionate use of avacopan in difficult-to-treat AAV patients. Avacopan demonstrated added-value in the treatment of our difficult-to-treat AAV cases with respect to improved disease control, reduced steroid dependence and reduced steroid-related toxicity. Disclosures: The work of YKOT was supported by the Dutch Kidney Foundation (17OKG04) and by the Arthritis Research and Collaboration Hub (ARCH) foundation. ARCH is funded by Dutch Arthritis Foundation (ReumaNederland). YKOT received an unrestricted research grant and consultancy fees from Vifor Pharma. References 1. Jayne, D.R.W., et al., Avacopan for the Treatment of ANCA-Associated Vasculitis. N Engl J Med, 2021. 384(7): p. 599-609. 2. ANCA vasculitis News. FDA Approves Tavneos as Add-on Therapy for Severe MPA, GPA. Published October 11, 2021. Accessed October 29, 2021. https://ancavasculitisnews.com/2021/10/11/fda-approves-tavneos-avacopan-add-on-mpa-gpa-therapy/ 3. Miloslavsky, E.M., et al., Development of a Glucocorticoid Toxicity Index (GTI) using multicriteria decision analysis. Ann Rheum Dis, 2017. 76(3): p. 543-546.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Matthew Koster1;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Background: Pre-clinical giant cell arteritis (GCA) mouse models have demonstrated effective suppression of arterial wall lesional T-cells through inhibition of Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) and JAK1. However, JAK inhibition in patients with GCA has not been formerly investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective, open-label, pilot study of baricitinib (4mg/day) in patients with relapsing GCA. The primary outcome was the frequency of adverse events and serious adverse events at week 52. Secondary outcomes included relapse at week 24 and week 52, change in pre-enrollment erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) to week 24 and week 52, and comparison of glucocorticoid dose at enrollment to week 24 and week 52. The study schema is outlined in Figure 1. Results: 15 patients were enrolled in the study (11, 73% female) with a mean(SD) age at entry 72.4(7.2) years, median(IQR) duration of GCA of 9 (7, 21) months, and median of 1 (1, 2) prior relapse. Treatments prior to study entry included: glucocorticoids (15, 100%); methotrexate (2, 13%); cyclophosphamide (1, 7%); sirukumab (1, 7%). Characteristics at GCA diagnosis and at relapse prior to study entry are listed in Table 1. Four (27%) patients entered the study on prednisone 30mg/day, 6 (40%) at 20 mg/day, and 5 (33%) at 10mg/day. One patient with baseline chronic kidney disease had a decline in renal function below study threshold for continuation and was withdrawn at week 8. The remaining 14 patients completed 52 weeks of baricitinib. At week 52, 14/15 (93%) patients had at least one adverse event recorded with the most frequent events including: infection not requiring antibiotics (n=8), infection requiring antibiotics (n=5), nausea (n=6), leg swelling (n=2), fatigue (n=2), diarrhea (n=1), abdominal pain (n=1). Two patients contracted COVID-19 during the study, both with mild symptoms, neither hospitalized. One patient had a serious adverse event during the study (transient thrombocytopenia attributed to concomitant use of antimicrobial therapy). Study outcomes are listed in Table 2. ESR and CRP were significantly lower at week 24 and week 52 compared to pre-enrollment values. Patient global assessment at week 0 was also significantly improved at both week 24 and week 52. Only 1 of 14 (7%) patients relapsed during the study (same patient at week 24 and week 52). The remaining 13 patients achieved steroid discontinuation and remained in disease remission during the duration of the 52-week study. Among patients completing the study, 4/14 (29%) flared during the 12-week follow up period after baricitinib discontinuation. Conclusion: In this proof of concept study, baricitinib at a dose of 4mg/day appeared both safe and effective in the management of patients with relapsing GCA. Larger randomized clinical trials are needed to determine the utility of JAK inhibition in GCA. Disclosures: KW received funds from Eli Lilly and Company to assist in the completion of the clinical trial. MK, CS, RG, JJ, EM, AD-G, CW report no financial disclosures of interest related to this study.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Setayesh Yazdani; Nicola De Maio; Matthieu Schapira;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This document is about the druggability and genetic variability of the ADP-bound pocket of SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NiRAN domain across coronaviruses and SARS-CoV-2 samples. This report also accompanies this post on https://openlabnotebooks.org/.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hayder Fawzi; Haydar Al-Tukmagi;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    examination of pharmacy students

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Duilio F Manara; Giulia Villa; Lisa Korelic; Cristina Arrigoni; Federica Dellafiore; Valentina Milani; Greta Ghizzardi; Arianna Magon; Noemi Giannetta; Rosario Caruso;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Interviews from Manara DF, Villa G, Korelic L, Arrigoni C, Dellafiore F, Milani V, Ghizzardi G, Magon A, Giannetta N, Caruso R. One-week longitudinal daily description of moral distress, coping, and general health in healthcare workers during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy: A quantitative diary study. Acta Biomed. 2021 Oct 5;92(S6):e2021461. doi: 10.23750/abm.v92iS6.12313. PMID: 34739455. Abstract Background and aim of the work .The fluctuation from day to day within a working week of moral distress, coping, and general health of frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) in facing the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic has been poorly studied. This study described the weekly fluctuation from day to day of moral distress, coping, and general health in frontline HCWs who worked during the first epidemic wave (May-June 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. Methods: This study has an intensive longitudinal design, and a convenience sampling procedure was employed to enroll physicians, nurses, allied health professions, and healthcare assistants. Data collection was performed using diary encompassed four sections: a socio-demographic form (required only at the baseline data collection) and three scales to assess moral distress, coping, and general health. Results: Results confirmed poor perceived health and mild moral distress in frontline HCWs, especially in HCWs with offspring, during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and the stability of their daily perception over a working week regarding moral distress, general health, and avoidant coping strategy, while approach coping strategy reported a slight fluctuation over time. Conclusions: Accordingly, on the one hand, these results confirm that outcomes regarding mental health and moral distress are pretty stable and provide insights, on the other hand, regarding the possible organizational interventions to support approach coping strategy as it seems more susceptible to variation over time.

  • Open Access French
    Authors: 
    GEBEIL Sophie; FELIX Christine; FILIPPI Pierre-Alain; MARTIN Perrine;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Le questionnaire a été diffusé en ligne du 9 avril 2020 au 7 juin 2020 sur http://sphinx2.espe.univ-amu.fr/v4/s/9ab5go Il a recueilli 4071 réponses.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Serkan Sayıner; Ahmet Özer Şehirli;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Although the types of coronaviruses seen in animals differ, recent studies have also shown that they are affected by COVID-19, known as SARS-CoV-2. The impact of COVID-19 on animals is a factor that should be followed carefully, especially since different variants appear in humans every day and this disease is transmitted from human to animal. Thanks to vaccination, animals are less affected by different types of coronaviruses. Cats and ferrets are especially affected much more in COVID-19, causing damage to the lungs and other organs. Recently, it has been shown that the use of monoclonal antibodies, especially in the early stages of COVID-19, by people with chronic diseases, positively affects the course of the disease, reduces the frequency of hospitalization and the possibility of falling into intensive care. Sotrovimab is a pan-sarbecovirus monoclonal antibody, and 12-13 studies to date have shown that individuals with chronic disease are less affected when given in the early stages of the disease when the symptoms are mild. We also think that if especially old cats and ferrets are treated with Sotrovimab in the early stages of the disease when they contract COVID-19, it will positively affect the prognosis of the disease.