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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
15 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
  • DK
  • University of Southern Denmark Research Output
  • PURE Aarhus University
  • Theses@asb

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meyerowitz-Katz, Gideon; Kashnitsky, Ilya;
    Publisher: OSF
    Country: Denmark

    We are writing this openly-published letter to express deep concerns regarding the paper recently published in JAMA Network Open: Estimation of US Children’s Educational Attainment and Years of Life Lost Associated With Primary School Closures During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.28786The paper by Christakis, Van Cleve, and Zimmerman(2020,abbrev. CVZ) is built upon multiple critically flawed assumptions, obvious misuse of the standard analytical tools, and clear mistakes in study design. Additionally, the analysis presented contains crucial mathematical and statistical errors that completely revert the main results, sufficient that if the estimates had been calculated according to the declared methodology, the results would completely contradict the stated conclusions and policy recommendations. These are not idle criticisms. This study has received enormous public attention, and its results immediately appeared in discussions of public health policies around schools worldwide. The central question is resolving an evidence base for the inevitable tradeoff between (a) the very real harms of missed education provoked by policies that decrease viral spread vs. (b) the resumption of education as a social good which increases viral spread. This is an incredibly important public health question, and it demands careful cost-benefit analysis. To that end, this paper adds no usable evidence whatsoever.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bohlbro, Anders Solitander; Møller Jensen, Andreas; Damerow, Sabine;
    Country: Denmark

    In the Covid-19 pandemic, it seems that African countries have been largely spared from the devastating effects observed elsewhere. Working and living in Guinea-Bissau, one of the poorest and most fragile countries in the world located in West Africa, we wonder: How can the world know that there are only few Covid-19 cases in a country where the health system is weak and access to Covid-19 tests very limited? How can the world know that there is a low Covid-19 mortality in a country without a reliable civil registration and vital statistic system? In this article, we explore the (too) many unknowns of Covid-19 in Guinea-Bissau. The article was chosen as the 1st place winner of the 2020 Eye on Global Health Writing Competition.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nissen, Nina; Andersen, Ingrid Charlotte; Simonÿ, Charlotte;
    Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sodemann, Morten;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aburto, José Manuel; Schöley, Jonas; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Kashyap, Ridhi;
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Sodemann, Morten; Larsen, Kirsten;
    Publisher: Spotify
    Country: Denmark

    WHO fungerer som hele verdens sundhedsstyrelse, men har et budget som et middelstort schweizisk universitet. Alligevel lyder kravet, at FN’s Verdenssundhedsorganisation skal gå forrest under den pandemi, der fortsat holder verden fanget i sit greb. Professor fra SDU og overlæge Morten Sodemann har i årtier fulgt WHO og er med til at folde ud, hvad organisationen er særligt god til, og hvad der går knap så godt i en tid, hvor WHO er kommet i klemme i et storpolitisk spil mellem USA og Kina. Bliv også klogere på WHO-historien, der i høj grad er præget af danske værdier. Dine værter er Kirsten Larsen og Lasse Soll Sunde.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Tørring, Marie Louise; Seeberg, Jens;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bresciani, Chiara; Hughes, Geoffrey;
    Country: Denmark

    Compilations of video clips of Italian mayors berating citizens breaking quarantine to walk dogs, jog, or play ping pong have become something of a ‘viral’ sensation both in Italy and globally. The clips are often amusing, featuring politicians accusing their constituents of vanity, incontinence, and other assorted sins. As anthropologists interested in the politics of accusation , these small-scale disputes allow us to think through the sorts of political horizons that the novel coronavirus is bringing into being. As the virus spreads, we seek to track the sorts of accusations that spread with it as they provoke what we call virological witch hunts. Unlike the episodes of public blaming and shaming some political figures have promoted through national media, virological witch hunts are small-scale, bottom-up, intimate, and usually amplified through local social networks. We link them to the phenomenon of the untori in XVI- XVII century Lombardy, another bottom-up surge of accusations against those believed to be spreading disease that authorities had to deal with. Relying on social media, we have been reaching out to quarantined residents of the province of Bergamo, in the Lombardy region who have been publicly shamed for perceived transgressions in the midst of the quarantine. The responses offer insight into how the pandemic has precipitated what Massimo, one of our interlocutors, has termed a “collective, hysterical version of preexisting individual patterns of blaming and shaming”.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Levin, Andrew; Owusu-Boaitey, Nana; Pugh, Sierra; Fosdick, Bailey K.; Zwi, Anthony B.; Malani, Anup; Soman, Satej; Besançon, Lonni; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Ganesh, Sachin; +8 more
    Country: Denmark
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
15 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meyerowitz-Katz, Gideon; Kashnitsky, Ilya;
    Publisher: OSF
    Country: Denmark

    We are writing this openly-published letter to express deep concerns regarding the paper recently published in JAMA Network Open: Estimation of US Children’s Educational Attainment and Years of Life Lost Associated With Primary School Closures During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.28786The paper by Christakis, Van Cleve, and Zimmerman(2020,abbrev. CVZ) is built upon multiple critically flawed assumptions, obvious misuse of the standard analytical tools, and clear mistakes in study design. Additionally, the analysis presented contains crucial mathematical and statistical errors that completely revert the main results, sufficient that if the estimates had been calculated according to the declared methodology, the results would completely contradict the stated conclusions and policy recommendations. These are not idle criticisms. This study has received enormous public attention, and its results immediately appeared in discussions of public health policies around schools worldwide. The central question is resolving an evidence base for the inevitable tradeoff between (a) the very real harms of missed education provoked by policies that decrease viral spread vs. (b) the resumption of education as a social good which increases viral spread. This is an incredibly important public health question, and it demands careful cost-benefit analysis. To that end, this paper adds no usable evidence whatsoever.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bohlbro, Anders Solitander; Møller Jensen, Andreas; Damerow, Sabine;
    Country: Denmark

    In the Covid-19 pandemic, it seems that African countries have been largely spared from the devastating effects observed elsewhere. Working and living in Guinea-Bissau, one of the poorest and most fragile countries in the world located in West Africa, we wonder: How can the world know that there are only few Covid-19 cases in a country where the health system is weak and access to Covid-19 tests very limited? How can the world know that there is a low Covid-19 mortality in a country without a reliable civil registration and vital statistic system? In this article, we explore the (too) many unknowns of Covid-19 in Guinea-Bissau. The article was chosen as the 1st place winner of the 2020 Eye on Global Health Writing Competition.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nissen, Nina; Andersen, Ingrid Charlotte; Simonÿ, Charlotte;
    Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sodemann, Morten;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aburto, José Manuel; Schöley, Jonas; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Kashyap, Ridhi;
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Sodemann, Morten; Larsen, Kirsten;
    Publisher: Spotify
    Country: Denmark

    WHO fungerer som hele verdens sundhedsstyrelse, men har et budget som et middelstort schweizisk universitet. Alligevel lyder kravet, at FN’s Verdenssundhedsorganisation skal gå forrest under den pandemi, der fortsat holder verden fanget i sit greb. Professor fra SDU og overlæge Morten Sodemann har i årtier fulgt WHO og er med til at folde ud, hvad organisationen er særligt god til, og hvad der går knap så godt i en tid, hvor WHO er kommet i klemme i et storpolitisk spil mellem USA og Kina. Bliv også klogere på WHO-historien, der i høj grad er præget af danske værdier. Dine værter er Kirsten Larsen og Lasse Soll Sunde.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Tørring, Marie Louise; Seeberg, Jens;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bresciani, Chiara; Hughes, Geoffrey;
    Country: Denmark

    Compilations of video clips of Italian mayors berating citizens breaking quarantine to walk dogs, jog, or play ping pong have become something of a ‘viral’ sensation both in Italy and globally. The clips are often amusing, featuring politicians accusing their constituents of vanity, incontinence, and other assorted sins. As anthropologists interested in the politics of accusation , these small-scale disputes allow us to think through the sorts of political horizons that the novel coronavirus is bringing into being. As the virus spreads, we seek to track the sorts of accusations that spread with it as they provoke what we call virological witch hunts. Unlike the episodes of public blaming and shaming some political figures have promoted through national media, virological witch hunts are small-scale, bottom-up, intimate, and usually amplified through local social networks. We link them to the phenomenon of the untori in XVI- XVII century Lombardy, another bottom-up surge of accusations against those believed to be spreading disease that authorities had to deal with. Relying on social media, we have been reaching out to quarantined residents of the province of Bergamo, in the Lombardy region who have been publicly shamed for perceived transgressions in the midst of the quarantine. The responses offer insight into how the pandemic has precipitated what Massimo, one of our interlocutors, has termed a “collective, hysterical version of preexisting individual patterns of blaming and shaming”.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Levin, Andrew; Owusu-Boaitey, Nana; Pugh, Sierra; Fosdick, Bailey K.; Zwi, Anthony B.; Malani, Anup; Soman, Satej; Besançon, Lonni; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Ganesh, Sachin; +8 more
    Country: Denmark