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115 Research products, page 1 of 12

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lipton, Briony; Basu, Sulagna;
    Publisher: The Gender Equality in Working Life Initiative
    Country: Australia

    Dress code is standard in the Australian public sector, with smart business casual the norm. However, over the last two years, as many workers relocated to the home office, bedroom or kitchen table during the COVID-19 pandemic , work attire has taken on new meaning. A key but under-researched advantage of remote working has been the relaxing in many professions dress codes, with ‘COVID casual’ becoming the norm for many workers. This report highlights the role of dress codes, appearance, and aesthetics in the Australian public sector and the refashioning of professional attire in the age of remote work.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Weissgerber, Tracey; Riedel, Nico; Kilicoglu, Halil; Labbe, Cyril; Eckmann, Peter; Ter Riet, Gerben; Byrne, Jennifer; Cabanac, Guillaume; Capes-Davis,; Amanda; +8 more
    Country: Australia
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Abayasingam, A.; Balachandran, H.; Agapiou, D.; Hammoud, M.; Rodrigo, C.; Keoshkerian, E.; Li, H.; Brasher, N.A.; Christ, D.; Rouet, R.; +22 more
    Country: Australia

    Considerable concerns relating to the duration of protective immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) exist, with evidence of antibody titers declining rapidly after infection and reports of reinfection. Here, we monitor the antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) for up to 6 months after infection. While antibody titers are maintained, _13% of the cohort's neutralizing responses return to background. However, encouragingly, in a selected subset of 13 participants, 12 have detectable RBD-specific memory B cells and these generally are increasing out to 6 months. Furthermore, we are able to generate monoclonal antibodies with SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing capacity from these memory B cells. Overall, our study suggests that the loss of neutralizing antibodies in plasma may be countered by the maintenance of neutralizing capacity in the memory B cell repertoire.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chen, S.D.; Hodge, C.;
    Country: Australia
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borges do Nascimento, Israel Júnior et al.;

    A growing body of literature on the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is becoming available, but a synthesis of available data has not been conducted. We performed a scoping review of currently available clinical, epidemiological, laboratory, and chest imaging data related to the SARS-CoV-2 infection. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Scopus and LILACS from 01 January 2019 to 24 February 2020. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed by two independent reviewers. Qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis were conducted using the clinical and laboratory data, and random-e ects models were applied to estimate pooled results. A total of 61 studies were included (59,254 patients). The most common disease-related symptoms were fever (82%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 56%–99%; n = 4410), cough (61%, 95% CI 39%–81%; n = 3985), muscle aches and/or fatigue (36%, 95% CI 18%–55%; n = 3778), dyspnea (26%, 95% CI 12%–41%; n = 3700), headache in 12% (95% CI 4%–23%, n = 3598 patients), sore throat in 10% (95% CI 5%–17%, n = 1387) and gastrointestinal symptoms in 9% (95% CI 3%–17%, n=1744). Laboratory findings were described in a lower number of patients and revealed lymphopenia (0.93 109/L, 95% CI 0.83–1.03 109/L, n = 464) and abnormal C-reactive protein (33.72 mg/dL, 95% CI 21.54–45.91 mg/dL; n = 1637). Radiological findings varied, but mostly described ground-glass opacities and consolidation. Data on treatment options were limited. All-cause mortality was 0.3% (95% CI 0.0%–1.0%; n = 53,631). Epidemiological studies showed that mortality was higher in males and elderly patients. The majority of reported clinical symptoms and laboratory findings related to SARS-CoV-2 infection are non-specific. Clinical suspicion, accompanied by a relevant epidemiological history, should be followed by early imaging and virological assay.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kalantar-Zadeh, K.; Li, P.K.-T.; Tantisattamo, E.; Kumaraswami, L.; Liakopoulos, V.; Lui, S.-F.; Ulasi, I.; Andreoli, S.; Balducci, A.; Dupuis, S.; +11 more
    Country: Australia

    Living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with hardships for patients and their care partners. Empowering patients and their care partners, including family members or friends involved in their care, may help minimize the burden and consequences of CKD-related symptoms to enable life participation. There is a need to broaden the focus on living well with kidney disease and re-engagement in life, including an emphasis on patients being in control. The World Kidney Day (WKD) Joint Steering Committee has declared 2021 the year of “Living Well with Kidney Disease” to increase education and awareness on the important goal of patient empowerment and life participation. This calls for the development and implementation of validated patient-reported outcome measures to assess and address areas of life participation in routine care. It could be supported by regulatory agencies as a metric for quality care or to support labelling claims for medicines and devices. Funding agencies could establish targeted calls for research that address the priorities of patients. Patients with kidney disease and their care partners should feel supported to live well through concerted efforts by kidney care communities including during pandemics. In the overall wellness program for kidney disease patients, the need for prevention should be reiterated. Early detection with a prolonged course of wellness despite kidney disease, after effective secondary and tertiary prevention programs, should be promoted. WKD 2021 continues to call for increased awareness of the importance of preventive measures throughout populations, professionals, and policy-makers, applicable to both developed and developing countries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kavanagh, Shane; Shiell, Alan; Hawe, Penelope; Garvey, Kate;
    Country: Australia

    Public health agencies tasked with improving the health of communities are poorly supported by many ‘business-as-usual’ funding practices. It is commonplace to call for more funding for health promotion, but additional funding could do more harm than good if, at the same time, we do not critically examine the micro-processes that lead to health enablement – micro-processes that are instigated or amplified by funding. We are currently engaged in a university-and-policy research partnership to identify how funding mechanisms may better serve the practice of community-based health promotion. We propose three primary considerations to inform the way funds are used to enable community-based health promotion. The first is a broader understanding and legitimising of the ‘soft infrastructure’ or resources required to enhance a community’s capacity for change. The second is recognition of social relationships as key to increasing the availability and management of resources within communities. The third consideration understands communities to be complex systems and argues that funding models are needed to support the dynamic evolution of these systems. By neglecting these considerations, current funding practices may inadvertently privilege communities with pre-existing capacity for change, potentially perpetuating inequalities in health. To begin to address these issues, aspects of funding processes (e.g., stability, guidance, evaluation, and feedback requirements) could be designed to better support the flourishing of community practice. Above all, funders must recognise that they are actors in the health system and they, like other actors, should be reflexive and accountable for their actions.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Svadzian, Anita; Vasquez, Nathaly Aguilera; Abimbola, Seye; Pai, Madhukar;
    Country: Australia
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Moaven, Len; Brown, James;
    Country: Australia
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hemila, Harri; Chalker, Elizabeth;
    Country: Australia
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
115 Research products, page 1 of 12
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lipton, Briony; Basu, Sulagna;
    Publisher: The Gender Equality in Working Life Initiative
    Country: Australia

    Dress code is standard in the Australian public sector, with smart business casual the norm. However, over the last two years, as many workers relocated to the home office, bedroom or kitchen table during the COVID-19 pandemic , work attire has taken on new meaning. A key but under-researched advantage of remote working has been the relaxing in many professions dress codes, with ‘COVID casual’ becoming the norm for many workers. This report highlights the role of dress codes, appearance, and aesthetics in the Australian public sector and the refashioning of professional attire in the age of remote work.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Weissgerber, Tracey; Riedel, Nico; Kilicoglu, Halil; Labbe, Cyril; Eckmann, Peter; Ter Riet, Gerben; Byrne, Jennifer; Cabanac, Guillaume; Capes-Davis,; Amanda; +8 more
    Country: Australia
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Abayasingam, A.; Balachandran, H.; Agapiou, D.; Hammoud, M.; Rodrigo, C.; Keoshkerian, E.; Li, H.; Brasher, N.A.; Christ, D.; Rouet, R.; +22 more
    Country: Australia

    Considerable concerns relating to the duration of protective immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) exist, with evidence of antibody titers declining rapidly after infection and reports of reinfection. Here, we monitor the antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) for up to 6 months after infection. While antibody titers are maintained, _13% of the cohort's neutralizing responses return to background. However, encouragingly, in a selected subset of 13 participants, 12 have detectable RBD-specific memory B cells and these generally are increasing out to 6 months. Furthermore, we are able to generate monoclonal antibodies with SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing capacity from these memory B cells. Overall, our study suggests that the loss of neutralizing antibodies in plasma may be countered by the maintenance of neutralizing capacity in the memory B cell repertoire.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chen, S.D.; Hodge, C.;
    Country: Australia
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borges do Nascimento, Israel Júnior et al.;

    A growing body of literature on the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is becoming available, but a synthesis of available data has not been conducted. We performed a scoping review of currently available clinical, epidemiological, laboratory, and chest imaging data related to the SARS-CoV-2 infection. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Scopus and LILACS from 01 January 2019 to 24 February 2020. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed by two independent reviewers. Qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis were conducted using the clinical and laboratory data, and random-e ects models were applied to estimate pooled results. A total of 61 studies were included (59,254 patients). The most common disease-related symptoms were fever (82%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 56%–99%; n = 4410), cough (61%, 95% CI 39%–81%; n = 3985), muscle aches and/or fatigue (36%, 95% CI 18%–55%; n = 3778), dyspnea (26%, 95% CI 12%–41%; n = 3700), headache in 12% (95% CI 4%–23%, n = 3598 patients), sore throat in 10% (95% CI 5%–17%, n = 1387) and gastrointestinal symptoms in 9% (95% CI 3%–17%, n=1744). Laboratory findings were described in a lower number of patients and revealed lymphopenia (0.93 109/L, 95% CI 0.83–1.03 109/L, n = 464) and abnormal C-reactive protein (33.72 mg/dL, 95% CI 21.54–45.91 mg/dL; n = 1637). Radiological findings varied, but mostly described ground-glass opacities and consolidation. Data on treatment options were limited. All-cause mortality was 0.3% (95% CI 0.0%–1.0%; n = 53,631). Epidemiological studies showed that mortality was higher in males and elderly patients. The majority of reported clinical symptoms and laboratory findings related to SARS-CoV-2 infection are non-specific. Clinical suspicion, accompanied by a relevant epidemiological history, should be followed by early imaging and virological assay.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kalantar-Zadeh, K.; Li, P.K.-T.; Tantisattamo, E.; Kumaraswami, L.; Liakopoulos, V.; Lui, S.-F.; Ulasi, I.; Andreoli, S.; Balducci, A.; Dupuis, S.; +11 more
    Country: Australia

    Living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with hardships for patients and their care partners. Empowering patients and their care partners, including family members or friends involved in their care, may help minimize the burden and consequences of CKD-related symptoms to enable life participation. There is a need to broaden the focus on living well with kidney disease and re-engagement in life, including an emphasis on patients being in control. The World Kidney Day (WKD) Joint Steering Committee has declared 2021 the year of “Living Well with Kidney Disease” to increase education and awareness on the important goal of patient empowerment and life participation. This calls for the development and implementation of validated patient-reported outcome measures to assess and address areas of life participation in routine care. It could be supported by regulatory agencies as a metric for quality care or to support labelling claims for medicines and devices. Funding agencies could establish targeted calls for research that address the priorities of patients. Patients with kidney disease and their care partners should feel supported to live well through concerted efforts by kidney care communities including during pandemics. In the overall wellness program for kidney disease patients, the need for prevention should be reiterated. Early detection with a prolonged course of wellness despite kidney disease, after effective secondary and tertiary prevention programs, should be promoted. WKD 2021 continues to call for increased awareness of the importance of preventive measures throughout populations, professionals, and policy-makers, applicable to both developed and developing countries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kavanagh, Shane; Shiell, Alan; Hawe, Penelope; Garvey, Kate;
    Country: Australia

    Public health agencies tasked with improving the health of communities are poorly supported by many ‘business-as-usual’ funding practices. It is commonplace to call for more funding for health promotion, but additional funding could do more harm than good if, at the same time, we do not critically examine the micro-processes that lead to health enablement – micro-processes that are instigated or amplified by funding. We are currently engaged in a university-and-policy research partnership to identify how funding mechanisms may better serve the practice of community-based health promotion. We propose three primary considerations to inform the way funds are used to enable community-based health promotion. The first is a broader understanding and legitimising of the ‘soft infrastructure’ or resources required to enhance a community’s capacity for change. The second is recognition of social relationships as key to increasing the availability and management of resources within communities. The third consideration understands communities to be complex systems and argues that funding models are needed to support the dynamic evolution of these systems. By neglecting these considerations, current funding practices may inadvertently privilege communities with pre-existing capacity for change, potentially perpetuating inequalities in health. To begin to address these issues, aspects of funding processes (e.g., stability, guidance, evaluation, and feedback requirements) could be designed to better support the flourishing of community practice. Above all, funders must recognise that they are actors in the health system and they, like other actors, should be reflexive and accountable for their actions.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Svadzian, Anita; Vasquez, Nathaly Aguilera; Abimbola, Seye; Pai, Madhukar;
    Country: Australia
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Moaven, Len; Brown, James;
    Country: Australia
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hemila, Harri; Chalker, Elizabeth;
    Country: Australia