Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
87 Research products, page 1 of 9

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
  • Closed Access
  • Other ORP type
  • English
  • COVID-19

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Other research product . Other ORP type
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Moslinger, Emily;
    Country: Canada

    Background: Viral respiratory infections represent a significant burden of illness with high morbidity and mortality, which has been further magnified in recent years by the emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Viruses including SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A Virus (Flu-A), and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) utilize the nasopharynx for viral entry, replication and infection. The nasopharynx epithelial cell mucous membrane harbors a diverse community of bacteria, called the nasal microbiota (NM). Flu-A can modulate changes in the NM community and lead to pathobiont enrichment. Therefore, here we aim to investigate the NM of individuals with SARS-CoV-2, Flu-A and RSV infection, and identify correlates between the NM community and viral load (VL) and SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC). Methods: Nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs were collected and tested for SARS-CoV-2, Flu-A, and RSV by validated real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays. RNA extraction was performed using a Maxwell automatic nucleic acid extractor followed by 16S rRNA Illumina Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) library sample preparation for NGS on a MiSeq Sequencer. QIIME II, Microbiome Analyst and PRISM 9.0.0 were used for data analysis. Results: NP swabs from 118 SARS-CoV-2, 40 Flu-A, 26 RSV positive and 45 negative controls (NC) were included. An increase in alpha and beta bacterial diversity (p<0.001) was observed in the NM of SARS-CoV-2 patients and an enrichment in Streptococcus and Staphylococcus species and depletion of Bifidobacterium and Moraxella species compared to NC’s (p<0.001). Compared to Flu-A and RSV patients, SARS-CoV-2 positives showed enrichment in Streptococcus, and depletion in Haemophilus species (p<0.002). 73/118 SARS-CoV-2 specimens were further sequenced to identify VOC lineage and stratified by VL. No significance in bacterial richness, diversity, or abundance correlated to VL. Only a significant difference in beta diversity was observed between the alpha/delta and omicron cohorts (p<0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the NM community is different in individuals with respiratory illness and distinct between SARS-CoV-2, Flu-A and RSV infected individuals. This study also demonstrated that NM beta diversity was different between individuals with different SARS-CoV-2 lineages, suggesting virus-NM interplay that may be important in explaining differences in transmission potentials and pathogenesis between SARS-CoV-2 VOCs.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    C. Sacerdoti Coen, I. Salvo;
    Publisher: Sun SITE Central Europe
    Country: Italy

    The Italian Conference on Theoretical Computer Science (ICTCS) is the annual conference of the Italian Chapter of the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (IC-EATCS), The purpose of the meeting is to foster the cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from different areas of theoretical computer science. In particular, ICTCS provides an ideal environment where junior researchers and PhD students can meet senior researchers. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following: agents, algorithms, argumentation, automata theory, complexity theory, computational logic, computational social choice, concurrency theory, cryptography, discrete mathematics, distributed computing, dynamical systems, formal methods, game theory, graph theory, knowledge representation, languages, model checking, process algebras, quantum computing, rewriting systems, security and trust, semantics, specification and verification, systems biology, theorem proving, type theory. The 22nd Italian Conference on Theoretical Computer Science (ICTCS 2021) has been hosted by the University of Bologna. Due to the worldwide evolution of COVID-19, it was held online on September 13–15, 2021. ICTCS 2021 received 38 submissions (25 regular papers and 13 communications), of which 28 were accepted for presentation at the conference and then published on http://ceurws.org/ (18 regular papers and 10 communications). Each submission was assessed by at least 3 reviewers, for a total of 69 reviewers (23 program committee members plus 46 additional reviewers) producing 114 reviews overall. The authors of the accepted contributions mostly came from Italy (16). Foreign contributions came from USA (2), India (2), Japan (1), Germany (1), Switzerland (1), and Algeria (1). 4 contributions are joint work between italian and foreign authors. ICTCS 2021 was attended by 68 people.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Nardelli, P.; Scandroglio, A.M.; De Piero, M.E.; Mariani, S.; Lorusso, R.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Purpose of reviewCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we had to approach hospital- and intensive care unit (ICU)-related resource management, especially for demanding techniques required for advanced support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).Recent findingsAvailability of ICU beds and ECMO machines widely varies around the world. In critical conditions, such a global pandemic, the establishment of contingency capacity tiers might help in defining to which conditions and subjects ECMO can be offered. A frequent reassessment of the resource saturation, possibly integrated within a regional healthcare coordination system, may be of help to triage the patients who most likely will benefit from advanced techniques, especially when capacities are limited.SummaryIndications to ECMO during the pandemic should be fluid and may be adjusted over time. Candidacy of patients should follow the same prepandemic rules, taking into account the acute disease, the burden of any eventual comorbidity and the chances of a good quality of life after recovery; but the current capacity of healthcare system should also be considered, and frequently reassessed, possibly within a wide hub-and-spoke healthcare system.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Roozen, G.V.T.; Roukens, A.H.E.; Roestenberg, M.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Despite tremendous efforts, worldwide COVID-19 vaccination coverage is lagging. Dose-sparing strategies for COVID-19 vaccines can increase vaccine availability to address the global crisis. Several clinical trials evaluating dose sparing are currently underway. However, to rapidly provide solid scientific justification for different dose-sparing strategies, joint coordinated action involving both public and private parties is needed. In this Viewpoint, we provide examples of approaches to vaccine dose-sparing that have previously been evaluated in clinical trials to improve vaccine availability and reflect on the origin of their funding. With a focus on the current COVID-19 pandemic, we stress the need for expedited testing of vaccine dose-sparing strategies in endemic or epidemic infectious diseases. However, we argue that the establishment of a mechanism through which dose-sparing opportunities are systematically identified, scientifically tested, and ultimately implemented will prove to be valuable beyond the current pandemic for infectious diseases product development and pandemic preparedness in the future.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Massimiliano Musi;
    Publisher: Bonomo Editore
    Country: Italy

    The incessant changes in all areas of economy, science, politics and society, with a greater acceleration in recent years, are affecting also the transport regulation, one of the most stable of all the branches of law, having in mind that one of its areas, the Maritime Law, has maintained almost unchanged over the centuries many of the institutes and figures that most characterize it, such as general average, salvage, limitation of the liability of the shipowner, the charterparty, the bill of lading, the role of the master and the crew. In a world in which phenomena such as the Covid-19 pandemic, Brexit and the ever-increasing use of new technologies, despite being profoundly different from each other, have had and certainly do have a prominent role, operators in any sector find themselves having to face, often from one moment to the next, and therefore unexpectedly and in no time, a multiplicity of problems that are largely completely new, in order to avoid, or at least mitigate, the consequences of total or partial paralysis of their activities. Given the circumstances, legislators, national and international regulatory bodies and jurists are called upon to urgently reconsider and/or integrate the disciplines currently in force, both from the public and private aspects, taking into account the critical issues that are gradually emerging. Clearly, in a globalized context like the one we live in, characterized by a strong interconnection of activities and sectors with each other and where the interaction of multiple factors is inevitable, the panorama is of such complexity that, at the time being, no one is yet able to predict what future developments may be in detail, in the full awareness, however, that the playground is in constant becoming. The choice of the regulatory approach to be followed from time to time is far from easy, especially in the knowledge that on the one hand the evolution of legislation, geopolitics, technology and the behavior of operators on the relevant market are closely interconnected, and that on the other hand a not well shaped regulation could become an obstacle to the development of trade and, more generally, of global economy. New phenomena always give rise to unprecedented problems and, if it is not possible to give a full solution to them by means of the rules already in force, the legislators, making use of various forms of regulatory instruments, in terms both of quality and of extension of territorial effectiveness, should implement an evolution of the regulations, introducing new norms or modifying existing ones, also in light of the interests of the different stakeholders, often conflicting and variously declined, and of the practices that in some cases have been established and have remained constant and unchanged for a very long time. The multiplicity and multiformity of the problems that arise must not discourage, but rather act as a further stimulus: in such a tumultuous contingent situation, it is essential to maintain a certain order and an adequate methodological rigor in dealing with the individual problems, putting them into focus one by one, in order to then slowly expand the view and obtain an overall picture. In this perspective, the selected essays collected in this volume examine, in their dual scientific-academic and practical soul, both issues that arise as a result of the new phenomena mentioned above, and more “classic” topics of the matter, but analyzing them having regard to their most recent developments.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Gupta, Rajan; Pandey, Gaurav; Pal, Saibal K.;
    Country: Slovenia

    Epidemiological modeling is an important problem around the world. This research presents COVID-19 analysis to understand which model works better for different regions. A comparative analysis of three growth curve fitting models (Gompertz, Logistic, and Exponential), two mathematical models (SEIR and IDEA), two forecasting models (Holt’s exponential and ARIMA), and four machine/deep learning models (Neural Network, LSTM Networks, GANs, and Random Forest) using three evaluation criteria on ten prominent regions around the world from North America, South America, Europe, and Asia has been presented. The minimum and median values for RMSE were 1.8 and 5372.9 the values for the mean absolute percentage error were 0.005 and 6.63 and the values for AIC were 87.07 and 613.3, respectively, from a total of 125 experiments across 10 regions. The growth curve fitting models worked well where flattening of the cases has started. Based on region’s growth curve, a relevant model from the list can be used for predicting the number of infected cases for COVID-19. Some other models used in forecasting the number of cases have been added in the future work section, which can help researchers to forecast the number of cases in different regions of the world.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Alemanno, A.; Bialasiewicz, L.;
    Country: Netherlands

    This article discusses some of the challenges posed by the introduction of COVID-19 certificates as a privileged tool for opening up mobility and access in order to restore a semblance of normality to social life. While at present there is no international consensus either on how - or why - such certificates should be used or on how they should be designed and applied, a growing number of countries have already introduced COVID-19 certificates in one form or another. Yet the scientific community as well as the World Health Organisation (WHO) have expressed caution, noting that such certificates might disproportionately discriminate against people on the basis of race, religion and socioeconomic background, as well as on the basis of age due to the sequencing of the vaccine rollout. Indeed, while the new COVID-19 certificates may appear to promise a magical solution enabling us to free up global mobility and reopen economies, they actually risk creating new borders and new forms of inequality through an exclusionary sorting and profiling mechanism that delimits "safe" from "unsafe" bodies, based on differential access to "immuno-privilege"- but also differential forms of "bio-securitisation". They also provide an illusion of pandemic safety - assuring citizens that through the "fetish" of the certificate "safe travel" can magically be reinstated. Securing territories and populations has always been, in Foucauldian terms, a matter of "making a division between good and bad circulation and maximizing the good circulation by diminishing the bad". We can therefore reasonably expect growing contestation, including before courts, around COVID-19 certificates in their different national and international iterations, as their inherently discriminatory nature and other unintended consequences such as those stemming from the use of persuasive - as opposed to the more traditional coercive - governmental power begin to unfold in their performative trajectory.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    De Vries, Anita; Brenninkmeijer, V.; van Vuuren, Tinka; De Cuyper, Nele; Leerstoel Taris; Work and Organizational Psychology: Occupational Health Psychology;
    Country: Netherlands

    De COVID-19-pandemie en de daarmee gepaard gaande maatregelen hebben een enorme impact op onze samenleving. Naast directe gevolgen voor onze gezondheid en ons psychologisch welbevinden, zijn er belangrijke consequenties op het gebied van werk en inkomen. Ook al weten we niet hoe toekomstige ontwikkelingen rondom het virus eruit zullen zien, COVID-19 kan nu al beschouwd worden als een game changer die de manier waarop werknemers en organisaties opereren ingrijpend heeft veranderd.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Bart van den Hurk; Ilona M. Otto; Christopher P. O. Reyer; Jeroen Aerts; Magnus Benzie; Emanuele Campiglio; Timothy R. Carter; Stefan Fronzek; Franziska Gaupp; Lukasz Jarzabek; +10 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | CASCADES (821010)

    N.A.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Toniolo, Sofia; Scarioni, Marta; di Lorenzo, Francesco; Hort, Jakub; Georges, Jean; Tomic, Svetlana; Nobili, Flavio; Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Bonanni, Laura;
    Country: Netherlands

    Cognitive impairment following SARS-CoV-2 infection is being increasingly recognized as an acute and possibly also long-term sequela of the disease. Direct viral entry as well as systemic mechanisms such as cytokine storm are thought to contribute to neuroinflammation in these patients. Biomarkers of COVID-19-induced cognitive impairment are currently lacking, but there is some limited evidence that SARS-CoV-2 could preferentially target the frontal lobes, as suggested by behavioral and dysexecutive symptoms, fronto-temporal hypoperfusion on MRI, EEG slowing in frontal regions, and frontal hypometabolism on 18F-FDG-PET. Possible confounders include cognitive impairment due to hypoxia and mechanical ventilation and post-traumatic stress disorder. Conversely, patients already suffering from dementia, as well as their caregivers, have been greatly impacted by the disruption of their care caused by COVID-19. Patients with dementia have experienced worsening of cognitive, behavioral, and psychological symptoms, and the rate of COVID-19-related deaths is disproportionately high among cognitively impaired people. Multiple factors, such as difficulties in remembering and executing safeguarding procedures, age, comorbidities, residing in care homes, and poorer access to hospital standard of care play a role in the increased morbidity and mortality. Non-pharmacological interventions and new technologies have shown a potential for the management of patients with dementia, and for the support of their caregivers.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
87 Research products, page 1 of 9
  • Other research product . Other ORP type
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Moslinger, Emily;
    Country: Canada

    Background: Viral respiratory infections represent a significant burden of illness with high morbidity and mortality, which has been further magnified in recent years by the emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Viruses including SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A Virus (Flu-A), and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) utilize the nasopharynx for viral entry, replication and infection. The nasopharynx epithelial cell mucous membrane harbors a diverse community of bacteria, called the nasal microbiota (NM). Flu-A can modulate changes in the NM community and lead to pathobiont enrichment. Therefore, here we aim to investigate the NM of individuals with SARS-CoV-2, Flu-A and RSV infection, and identify correlates between the NM community and viral load (VL) and SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC). Methods: Nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs were collected and tested for SARS-CoV-2, Flu-A, and RSV by validated real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays. RNA extraction was performed using a Maxwell automatic nucleic acid extractor followed by 16S rRNA Illumina Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) library sample preparation for NGS on a MiSeq Sequencer. QIIME II, Microbiome Analyst and PRISM 9.0.0 were used for data analysis. Results: NP swabs from 118 SARS-CoV-2, 40 Flu-A, 26 RSV positive and 45 negative controls (NC) were included. An increase in alpha and beta bacterial diversity (p<0.001) was observed in the NM of SARS-CoV-2 patients and an enrichment in Streptococcus and Staphylococcus species and depletion of Bifidobacterium and Moraxella species compared to NC’s (p<0.001). Compared to Flu-A and RSV patients, SARS-CoV-2 positives showed enrichment in Streptococcus, and depletion in Haemophilus species (p<0.002). 73/118 SARS-CoV-2 specimens were further sequenced to identify VOC lineage and stratified by VL. No significance in bacterial richness, diversity, or abundance correlated to VL. Only a significant difference in beta diversity was observed between the alpha/delta and omicron cohorts (p<0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the NM community is different in individuals with respiratory illness and distinct between SARS-CoV-2, Flu-A and RSV infected individuals. This study also demonstrated that NM beta diversity was different between individuals with different SARS-CoV-2 lineages, suggesting virus-NM interplay that may be important in explaining differences in transmission potentials and pathogenesis between SARS-CoV-2 VOCs.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    C. Sacerdoti Coen, I. Salvo;
    Publisher: Sun SITE Central Europe
    Country: Italy

    The Italian Conference on Theoretical Computer Science (ICTCS) is the annual conference of the Italian Chapter of the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (IC-EATCS), The purpose of the meeting is to foster the cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from different areas of theoretical computer science. In particular, ICTCS provides an ideal environment where junior researchers and PhD students can meet senior researchers. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following: agents, algorithms, argumentation, automata theory, complexity theory, computational logic, computational social choice, concurrency theory, cryptography, discrete mathematics, distributed computing, dynamical systems, formal methods, game theory, graph theory, knowledge representation, languages, model checking, process algebras, quantum computing, rewriting systems, security and trust, semantics, specification and verification, systems biology, theorem proving, type theory. The 22nd Italian Conference on Theoretical Computer Science (ICTCS 2021) has been hosted by the University of Bologna. Due to the worldwide evolution of COVID-19, it was held online on September 13–15, 2021. ICTCS 2021 received 38 submissions (25 regular papers and 13 communications), of which 28 were accepted for presentation at the conference and then published on http://ceurws.org/ (18 regular papers and 10 communications). Each submission was assessed by at least 3 reviewers, for a total of 69 reviewers (23 program committee members plus 46 additional reviewers) producing 114 reviews overall. The authors of the accepted contributions mostly came from Italy (16). Foreign contributions came from USA (2), India (2), Japan (1), Germany (1), Switzerland (1), and Algeria (1). 4 contributions are joint work between italian and foreign authors. ICTCS 2021 was attended by 68 people.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Nardelli, P.; Scandroglio, A.M.; De Piero, M.E.; Mariani, S.; Lorusso, R.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Purpose of reviewCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we had to approach hospital- and intensive care unit (ICU)-related resource management, especially for demanding techniques required for advanced support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).Recent findingsAvailability of ICU beds and ECMO machines widely varies around the world. In critical conditions, such a global pandemic, the establishment of contingency capacity tiers might help in defining to which conditions and subjects ECMO can be offered. A frequent reassessment of the resource saturation, possibly integrated within a regional healthcare coordination system, may be of help to triage the patients who most likely will benefit from advanced techniques, especially when capacities are limited.SummaryIndications to ECMO during the pandemic should be fluid and may be adjusted over time. Candidacy of patients should follow the same prepandemic rules, taking into account the acute disease, the burden of any eventual comorbidity and the chances of a good quality of life after recovery; but the current capacity of healthcare system should also be considered, and frequently reassessed, possibly within a wide hub-and-spoke healthcare system.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Roozen, G.V.T.; Roukens, A.H.E.; Roestenberg, M.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Despite tremendous efforts, worldwide COVID-19 vaccination coverage is lagging. Dose-sparing strategies for COVID-19 vaccines can increase vaccine availability to address the global crisis. Several clinical trials evaluating dose sparing are currently underway. However, to rapidly provide solid scientific justification for different dose-sparing strategies, joint coordinated action involving both public and private parties is needed. In this Viewpoint, we provide examples of approaches to vaccine dose-sparing that have previously been evaluated in clinical trials to improve vaccine availability and reflect on the origin of their funding. With a focus on the current COVID-19 pandemic, we stress the need for expedited testing of vaccine dose-sparing strategies in endemic or epidemic infectious diseases. However, we argue that the establishment of a mechanism through which dose-sparing opportunities are systematically identified, scientifically tested, and ultimately implemented will prove to be valuable beyond the current pandemic for infectious diseases product development and pandemic preparedness in the future.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Massimiliano Musi;
    Publisher: Bonomo Editore
    Country: Italy

    The incessant changes in all areas of economy, science, politics and society, with a greater acceleration in recent years, are affecting also the transport regulation, one of the most stable of all the branches of law, having in mind that one of its areas, the Maritime Law, has maintained almost unchanged over the centuries many of the institutes and figures that most characterize it, such as general average, salvage, limitation of the liability of the shipowner, the charterparty, the bill of lading, the role of the master and the crew. In a world in which phenomena such as the Covid-19 pandemic, Brexit and the ever-increasing use of new technologies, despite being profoundly different from each other, have had and certainly do have a prominent role, operators in any sector find themselves having to face, often from one moment to the next, and therefore unexpectedly and in no time, a multiplicity of problems that are largely completely new, in order to avoid, or at least mitigate, the consequences of total or partial paralysis of their activities. Given the circumstances, legislators, national and international regulatory bodies and jurists are called upon to urgently reconsider and/or integrate the disciplines currently in force, both from the public and private aspects, taking into account the critical issues that are gradually emerging. Clearly, in a globalized context like the one we live in, characterized by a strong interconnection of activities and sectors with each other and where the interaction of multiple factors is inevitable, the panorama is of such complexity that, at the time being, no one is yet able to predict what future developments may be in detail, in the full awareness, however, that the playground is in constant becoming. The choice of the regulatory approach to be followed from time to time is far from easy, especially in the knowledge that on the one hand the evolution of legislation, geopolitics, technology and the behavior of operators on the relevant market are closely interconnected, and that on the other hand a not well shaped regulation could become an obstacle to the development of trade and, more generally, of global economy. New phenomena always give rise to unprecedented problems and, if it is not possible to give a full solution to them by means of the rules already in force, the legislators, making use of various forms of regulatory instruments, in terms both of quality and of extension of territorial effectiveness, should implement an evolution of the regulations, introducing new norms or modifying existing ones, also in light of the interests of the different stakeholders, often conflicting and variously declined, and of the practices that in some cases have been established and have remained constant and unchanged for a very long time. The multiplicity and multiformity of the problems that arise must not discourage, but rather act as a further stimulus: in such a tumultuous contingent situation, it is essential to maintain a certain order and an adequate methodological rigor in dealing with the individual problems, putting them into focus one by one, in order to then slowly expand the view and obtain an overall picture. In this perspective, the selected essays collected in this volume examine, in their dual scientific-academic and practical soul, both issues that arise as a result of the new phenomena mentioned above, and more “classic” topics of the matter, but analyzing them having regard to their most recent developments.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Gupta, Rajan; Pandey, Gaurav; Pal, Saibal K.;
    Country: Slovenia

    Epidemiological modeling is an important problem around the world. This research presents COVID-19 analysis to understand which model works better for different regions. A comparative analysis of three growth curve fitting models (Gompertz, Logistic, and Exponential), two mathematical models (SEIR and IDEA), two forecasting models (Holt’s exponential and ARIMA), and four machine/deep learning models (Neural Network, LSTM Networks, GANs, and Random Forest) using three evaluation criteria on ten prominent regions around the world from North America, South America, Europe, and Asia has been presented. The minimum and median values for RMSE were 1.8 and 5372.9 the values for the mean absolute percentage error were 0.005 and 6.63 and the values for AIC were 87.07 and 613.3, respectively, from a total of 125 experiments across 10 regions. The growth curve fitting models worked well where flattening of the cases has started. Based on region’s growth curve, a relevant model from the list can be used for predicting the number of infected cases for COVID-19. Some other models used in forecasting the number of cases have been added in the future work section, which can help researchers to forecast the number of cases in different regions of the world.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Alemanno, A.; Bialasiewicz, L.;
    Country: Netherlands

    This article discusses some of the challenges posed by the introduction of COVID-19 certificates as a privileged tool for opening up mobility and access in order to restore a semblance of normality to social life. While at present there is no international consensus either on how - or why - such certificates should be used or on how they should be designed and applied, a growing number of countries have already introduced COVID-19 certificates in one form or another. Yet the scientific community as well as the World Health Organisation (WHO) have expressed caution, noting that such certificates might disproportionately discriminate against people on the basis of race, religion and socioeconomic background, as well as on the basis of age due to the sequencing of the vaccine rollout. Indeed, while the new COVID-19 certificates may appear to promise a magical solution enabling us to free up global mobility and reopen economies, they actually risk creating new borders and new forms of inequality through an exclusionary sorting and profiling mechanism that delimits "safe" from "unsafe" bodies, based on differential access to "immuno-privilege"- but also differential forms of "bio-securitisation". They also provide an illusion of pandemic safety - assuring citizens that through the "fetish" of the certificate "safe travel" can magically be reinstated. Securing territories and populations has always been, in Foucauldian terms, a matter of "making a division between good and bad circulation and maximizing the good circulation by diminishing the bad". We can therefore reasonably expect growing contestation, including before courts, around COVID-19 certificates in their different national and international iterations, as their inherently discriminatory nature and other unintended consequences such as those stemming from the use of persuasive - as opposed to the more traditional coercive - governmental power begin to unfold in their performative trajectory.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    De Vries, Anita; Brenninkmeijer, V.; van Vuuren, Tinka; De Cuyper, Nele; Leerstoel Taris; Work and Organizational Psychology: Occupational Health Psychology;
    Country: Netherlands

    De COVID-19-pandemie en de daarmee gepaard gaande maatregelen hebben een enorme impact op onze samenleving. Naast directe gevolgen voor onze gezondheid en ons psychologisch welbevinden, zijn er belangrijke consequenties op het gebied van werk en inkomen. Ook al weten we niet hoe toekomstige ontwikkelingen rondom het virus eruit zullen zien, COVID-19 kan nu al beschouwd worden als een game changer die de manier waarop werknemers en organisaties opereren ingrijpend heeft veranderd.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Bart van den Hurk; Ilona M. Otto; Christopher P. O. Reyer; Jeroen Aerts; Magnus Benzie; Emanuele Campiglio; Timothy R. Carter; Stefan Fronzek; Franziska Gaupp; Lukasz Jarzabek; +10 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | CASCADES (821010)

    N.A.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Toniolo, Sofia; Scarioni, Marta; di Lorenzo, Francesco; Hort, Jakub; Georges, Jean; Tomic, Svetlana; Nobili, Flavio; Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Bonanni, Laura;
    Country: Netherlands

    Cognitive impairment following SARS-CoV-2 infection is being increasingly recognized as an acute and possibly also long-term sequela of the disease. Direct viral entry as well as systemic mechanisms such as cytokine storm are thought to contribute to neuroinflammation in these patients. Biomarkers of COVID-19-induced cognitive impairment are currently lacking, but there is some limited evidence that SARS-CoV-2 could preferentially target the frontal lobes, as suggested by behavioral and dysexecutive symptoms, fronto-temporal hypoperfusion on MRI, EEG slowing in frontal regions, and frontal hypometabolism on 18F-FDG-PET. Possible confounders include cognitive impairment due to hypoxia and mechanical ventilation and post-traumatic stress disorder. Conversely, patients already suffering from dementia, as well as their caregivers, have been greatly impacted by the disruption of their care caused by COVID-19. Patients with dementia have experienced worsening of cognitive, behavioral, and psychological symptoms, and the rate of COVID-19-related deaths is disproportionately high among cognitively impaired people. Multiple factors, such as difficulties in remembering and executing safeguarding procedures, age, comorbidities, residing in care homes, and poorer access to hospital standard of care play a role in the increased morbidity and mortality. Non-pharmacological interventions and new technologies have shown a potential for the management of patients with dementia, and for the support of their caregivers.