Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
927 Research products, page 1 of 93

  • COVID-19
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • Other ORP type
  • GB
  • English
  • COVID-19

10
arrow_drop_down
Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • English
    Authors: 
    Göndör, Gabor; Ksiazek, Sara H; Regele, Heinz; Kronbichler, Andreas; Knechtelsdorfer, Maarten; Säemann, Marcus D;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Country: United Kingdom

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) comprises a histologic pattern of glomerular injury with different underlying diseases. Here we report on a 47-year-old female with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) on top of a previously diagnosed idiopathic MPGN after receiving the first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccine. After aggressive immunosuppression her serum creatinine returned to normal values, along with reduction of proteinuria. Recently, numerous publications have reported an association of glomerular diseases with COVID-19 vaccination. Our case presents to the best of our knowledge the first occurrence of possible association of COVID-19 mRNA vaccination with a crescentic form of MPGN.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Kohler, Katharina; Morris, Andrew Conway;
    Publisher: The European respiratory journal
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Hung, Jason;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: United Kingdom

    Peer reviewed: True Here researchers have the disposition to engage in the scholarly discourse on how the pandemic adversely influenced individuals' mental health and what remedies should be exercised in response to the mental health challenges. There is a shortage of scholarly discussion about who benefitted from the occurrence of the pandemic. Mancini et al. argued that the pandemic benefitted the social and mental health functioning of a subset of the population, despite the pandemic causing considerable risks of harm to mental health. In this perspective, the author summarizes relevant findings and arguments to present which subsets of the population benefitted at school, at home, and in the workplace during the pandemic. Although COVID-19 is no longer deemed a pandemic, many by-products of the public health crisis, including the encouragement of remote work and studies, remain. In this perspective, by understanding who benefitted from the pandemic and why, the author can evaluate if any public policies formed in response to the pandemic should be kept in the long run in order to maximize individuals' mental health.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Geetha, Duvuru; Kronbichler, Andreas; Rutter, Megan; Bajpai, Divya; Menez, Steven; Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Anand, Shuchi; Lin, Eugene; Carlson, Nicholas; Sozio, Stephen; +15 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Zaccardi, Francesco; Tan, Pui San; Coupland, Carol; Shah, Baiju R; Clift, Ash Kieran; Saatci, Defne; Patone, Martina; Griffin, Simon J; Dambha-Miller, Hajira; Khunti, Kamlesh; +1 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funder: UK Research and Innovation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100014013 Funder: Academic Clinical Lecturer Funder: Applied Research Collaboration East Midlands (ARC EM)

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pearson, Amelia; Mcphillips, Rebecca; Clarkson, Paul; Allen, Rosie; Robinson, Catherine;
    Publisher: International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols
    Country: United Kingdom

    The primary objective of this scoping review is to understand the extent and type of evidence in relation to moral injury in social work staff. The secondary objective is to establish how moral injury has been defined in the literature in the context of social work. The review question is: what is currently known about moral injury in social work staff?

  • English
    Authors: 
    Willett, Brian J; Grove, Joe; MacLean, Oscar A; Wilkie, Craig; De Lorenzo, Giuditta; Furnon, Wilhelm; Cantoni, Diego; Scott, Sam; Logan, Nicola; Ashraf, Shirin; +31 more
    Publisher: Nature microbiology
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Willett, Brian J; Grove, Joe; MacLean, Oscar A; Wilkie, Craig; De Lorenzo, Giuditta; Furnon, Wilhelm; Cantoni, Diego; Scott, Sam; Logan, Nicola; Ashraf, Shirin; +33 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funder: Health Data Research UK (HDR UK) 2021.0155 Funder: Health Data Research UK (HDR UK) 2021.0155)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fineberg, Naomi A; Menchón, José M; Hall, Natalie; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Brand, Matthias; Potenza, Marc N; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Cirnigliaro, Giovanna; Lochner, Christine; Billieux, Joël; +34 more
    Countries: Netherlands, United Kingdom

    Global concern about problematic usage of the internet (PUI), and its public health and societal costs, continues to grow, sharpened in focus under the privations of the COVID-19 pandemic. This narrative review reports the expert opinions of members of the largest international network of researchers on PUI in the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action (CA 16207), on the scientific progress made and the critical knowledge gaps remaining to be filled as the term of the Action reaches its conclusion. A key advance has been achieving consensus on the clinical definition of various forms of PUI. Based on the overarching public health principles of protecting individuals and the public from harm and promoting the highest attainable standard of health, the World Health Organisation has introduced several new structured diagnoses into the ICD-11, including gambling disorder, gaming disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour disorder, and other unspecified or specified disorders due to addictive behaviours, alongside naming online activity as a diagnostic specifier. These definitions provide for the first time a sound platform for developing systematic networked research into various forms of PUI at global scale. Progress has also been made in areas such as refining and simplifying some of the available assessment instruments, clarifying the underpinning brain-based and social determinants, and building more empirically based etiological models, as a basis for therapeutic intervention, alongside public engagement initiatives. However, important gaps in our knowledge remain to be tackled. Principal among these include a better understanding of the course and evolution of the PUI-related problems, across different age groups, genders and other specific vulnerable groups, reliable methods for early identification of individuals at risk (before PUI becomes disordered), efficacious preventative and therapeutic interventions and ethical health and social policy changes that adequately safeguard human digital rights. The paper concludes with recommendations for achievable research goals, based on longitudinal analysis of a large multinational cohort co-designed with public stakeholders. © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND licence. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    López-Farfán, Diana; Yerbanga, R. Serge; Parres-Mercader, Marina; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Gómez-Navarro, Inmaculada; Sanou, Do Malick Soufiane; Yao, Adama Franck; Bosco Ouédraogo, Jean; Comas, Iñaki; Irigoyen, Nerea; +1 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: United Kingdom

    Peer reviewed: True Acknowledgements: We would like to thank all volunteers who participated in this study, as well as the local authorities and communities in Burkina Faso for their support. We also thank the IPBLN, IRSS and IBV core facilities for their support to project activities. Africa accounts for 1.5% of the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and 2.7% of deaths, but this low incidence has been partly attributed to the limited testing capacity in most countries. In addition, the population in many African countries is at high risk of infection with endemic infectious diseases such as malaria. Our aim is to determine the prevalence and circulation of SARS-CoV-2 variants, and the frequency of co-infection with the malaria parasite. We conducted serological tests and microscopy examinations on 998 volunteers of different ages and sexes in a random and stratified population sample in Burkina-Faso. In addition, nasopharyngeal samples were taken for RT-qPCR of SARS-CoV-2 and for whole viral genome sequencing. Our results show a 3.2 and a 2.5% of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and PCR positivity; and 22% of malaria incidence, over the sampling period, with marked differences linked to age. Importantly, we found 8 cases of confirmed co-infection and 11 cases of suspected co-infection mostly in children and teenagers. Finally, we report the genome sequences of 13 SARS-CoV-2 isolates circulating in Burkina Faso at the time of analysis, assigned to lineages A.19, A.21, B.1.1.404, B.1.1.118, B.1 and grouped into clades; 19B, 20A, and 20B. This is the first population-based study about SARS-CoV-2 and malaria in Burkina Faso during the first wave of the pandemic, providing a relevant estimation of the real prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 and variants circulating in this Western African country. Besides, it highlights the non-negligible frequency of co-infection with malaria in African communities.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
927 Research products, page 1 of 93
  • English
    Authors: 
    Göndör, Gabor; Ksiazek, Sara H; Regele, Heinz; Kronbichler, Andreas; Knechtelsdorfer, Maarten; Säemann, Marcus D;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Country: United Kingdom

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) comprises a histologic pattern of glomerular injury with different underlying diseases. Here we report on a 47-year-old female with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) on top of a previously diagnosed idiopathic MPGN after receiving the first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccine. After aggressive immunosuppression her serum creatinine returned to normal values, along with reduction of proteinuria. Recently, numerous publications have reported an association of glomerular diseases with COVID-19 vaccination. Our case presents to the best of our knowledge the first occurrence of possible association of COVID-19 mRNA vaccination with a crescentic form of MPGN.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Kohler, Katharina; Morris, Andrew Conway;
    Publisher: The European respiratory journal
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Hung, Jason;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: United Kingdom

    Peer reviewed: True Here researchers have the disposition to engage in the scholarly discourse on how the pandemic adversely influenced individuals' mental health and what remedies should be exercised in response to the mental health challenges. There is a shortage of scholarly discussion about who benefitted from the occurrence of the pandemic. Mancini et al. argued that the pandemic benefitted the social and mental health functioning of a subset of the population, despite the pandemic causing considerable risks of harm to mental health. In this perspective, the author summarizes relevant findings and arguments to present which subsets of the population benefitted at school, at home, and in the workplace during the pandemic. Although COVID-19 is no longer deemed a pandemic, many by-products of the public health crisis, including the encouragement of remote work and studies, remain. In this perspective, by understanding who benefitted from the pandemic and why, the author can evaluate if any public policies formed in response to the pandemic should be kept in the long run in order to maximize individuals' mental health.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Geetha, Duvuru; Kronbichler, Andreas; Rutter, Megan; Bajpai, Divya; Menez, Steven; Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Anand, Shuchi; Lin, Eugene; Carlson, Nicholas; Sozio, Stephen; +15 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Zaccardi, Francesco; Tan, Pui San; Coupland, Carol; Shah, Baiju R; Clift, Ash Kieran; Saatci, Defne; Patone, Martina; Griffin, Simon J; Dambha-Miller, Hajira; Khunti, Kamlesh; +1 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funder: UK Research and Innovation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100014013 Funder: Academic Clinical Lecturer Funder: Applied Research Collaboration East Midlands (ARC EM)

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pearson, Amelia; Mcphillips, Rebecca; Clarkson, Paul; Allen, Rosie; Robinson, Catherine;
    Publisher: International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols
    Country: United Kingdom

    The primary objective of this scoping review is to understand the extent and type of evidence in relation to moral injury in social work staff. The secondary objective is to establish how moral injury has been defined in the literature in the context of social work. The review question is: what is currently known about moral injury in social work staff?

  • English
    Authors: 
    Willett, Brian J; Grove, Joe; MacLean, Oscar A; Wilkie, Craig; De Lorenzo, Giuditta; Furnon, Wilhelm; Cantoni, Diego; Scott, Sam; Logan, Nicola; Ashraf, Shirin; +31 more
    Publisher: Nature microbiology
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Willett, Brian J; Grove, Joe; MacLean, Oscar A; Wilkie, Craig; De Lorenzo, Giuditta; Furnon, Wilhelm; Cantoni, Diego; Scott, Sam; Logan, Nicola; Ashraf, Shirin; +33 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funder: Health Data Research UK (HDR UK) 2021.0155 Funder: Health Data Research UK (HDR UK) 2021.0155)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fineberg, Naomi A; Menchón, José M; Hall, Natalie; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Brand, Matthias; Potenza, Marc N; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Cirnigliaro, Giovanna; Lochner, Christine; Billieux, Joël; +34 more
    Countries: Netherlands, United Kingdom

    Global concern about problematic usage of the internet (PUI), and its public health and societal costs, continues to grow, sharpened in focus under the privations of the COVID-19 pandemic. This narrative review reports the expert opinions of members of the largest international network of researchers on PUI in the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action (CA 16207), on the scientific progress made and the critical knowledge gaps remaining to be filled as the term of the Action reaches its conclusion. A key advance has been achieving consensus on the clinical definition of various forms of PUI. Based on the overarching public health principles of protecting individuals and the public from harm and promoting the highest attainable standard of health, the World Health Organisation has introduced several new structured diagnoses into the ICD-11, including gambling disorder, gaming disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour disorder, and other unspecified or specified disorders due to addictive behaviours, alongside naming online activity as a diagnostic specifier. These definitions provide for the first time a sound platform for developing systematic networked research into various forms of PUI at global scale. Progress has also been made in areas such as refining and simplifying some of the available assessment instruments, clarifying the underpinning brain-based and social determinants, and building more empirically based etiological models, as a basis for therapeutic intervention, alongside public engagement initiatives. However, important gaps in our knowledge remain to be tackled. Principal among these include a better understanding of the course and evolution of the PUI-related problems, across different age groups, genders and other specific vulnerable groups, reliable methods for early identification of individuals at risk (before PUI becomes disordered), efficacious preventative and therapeutic interventions and ethical health and social policy changes that adequately safeguard human digital rights. The paper concludes with recommendations for achievable research goals, based on longitudinal analysis of a large multinational cohort co-designed with public stakeholders. © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND licence. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    López-Farfán, Diana; Yerbanga, R. Serge; Parres-Mercader, Marina; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Gómez-Navarro, Inmaculada; Sanou, Do Malick Soufiane; Yao, Adama Franck; Bosco Ouédraogo, Jean; Comas, Iñaki; Irigoyen, Nerea; +1 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: United Kingdom

    Peer reviewed: True Acknowledgements: We would like to thank all volunteers who participated in this study, as well as the local authorities and communities in Burkina Faso for their support. We also thank the IPBLN, IRSS and IBV core facilities for their support to project activities. Africa accounts for 1.5% of the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and 2.7% of deaths, but this low incidence has been partly attributed to the limited testing capacity in most countries. In addition, the population in many African countries is at high risk of infection with endemic infectious diseases such as malaria. Our aim is to determine the prevalence and circulation of SARS-CoV-2 variants, and the frequency of co-infection with the malaria parasite. We conducted serological tests and microscopy examinations on 998 volunteers of different ages and sexes in a random and stratified population sample in Burkina-Faso. In addition, nasopharyngeal samples were taken for RT-qPCR of SARS-CoV-2 and for whole viral genome sequencing. Our results show a 3.2 and a 2.5% of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and PCR positivity; and 22% of malaria incidence, over the sampling period, with marked differences linked to age. Importantly, we found 8 cases of confirmed co-infection and 11 cases of suspected co-infection mostly in children and teenagers. Finally, we report the genome sequences of 13 SARS-CoV-2 isolates circulating in Burkina Faso at the time of analysis, assigned to lineages A.19, A.21, B.1.1.404, B.1.1.118, B.1 and grouped into clades; 19B, 20A, and 20B. This is the first population-based study about SARS-CoV-2 and malaria in Burkina Faso during the first wave of the pandemic, providing a relevant estimation of the real prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 and variants circulating in this Western African country. Besides, it highlights the non-negligible frequency of co-infection with malaria in African communities.